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History Analogies #4

Fill the blanks in these historical analogies.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: September 5, 2018
First submittedOctober 3, 2015
Times taken17,450
Rating4.22
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This is to this …
As …
Russia is to Soviet Union
Serbia is to Yugoslavia
Oswald is to Kennedy
Ruby is to Oswald
William is to Mary
Ferdinand is to Isabella
Schönbrunn is to Austria
Versailles is to France
Globe Theatre is to
London
Ford's Theatre is to
Washington
V-E Day is to Europe
V-J Day is to Japan
Hong Kong is to the
United Kingdom
Macao is to Portugal
Betamax is to VHS
HD DVD is Blu-Ray
Fatah is to PLO
Sinn Féin is to IRA
Jim Crow is to the
United States
Apartheid is to
South Africa
This is to this …
As …
Mercury is to Gemini
Gemini is to Apollo
Louisiana is to Louis XIV
Virginia is to Elizabeth
Beheading is to Anne Boleyn
Crucifixion is to
followers of Spartacus
Tommy is to British soldier
Jerry is to German soldier
Puritans are
to Massachusetts
Quakers are
to Pennsylvania
Greece is to
Modern Olympics
Uruguay is to
FIFA World Cup
Standard Oil is to Gasoline
De Beers is to Diamonds
Eli Whitney is to Cotton Gin
Alfred Nobel is to Dynamite
Königsberg is to Kaliningrad
Danzig is to Gdańsk
Lindbergh is to Men
Earhart is to Women
+3
level 10
Oct 3, 2015
I feel bad for lowering the average by 9 points.
+1
level 49
Dec 29, 2017
:-)
+1
level 72
Oct 4, 2015
From Wikipedia: Plutarch, Appian and Florus all claim that Spartacus died during the battle, but Appian also reports that his body was never found. Six thousand survivors of the revolt captured by the legions of Crassus were crucified...
+1
level ∞
Oct 5, 2015
D'oh! I knew that. Changed to "followers of Spartacus".
+2
level 73
Apr 23, 2019
That's because they all claimed to be Spartacus. Don't you guys ever watch famous movies?
+4
level 82
Oct 5, 2015
I'll start with the "surprised people didn't know" for this quiz. German soldier?? The least known? Really?
+1
level 76
Dec 12, 2015
I know... I bet people kicked themselves when they saw the answer.
+1
level 61
Feb 9, 2017
During World War I, the British soldiers were nicknamed Tommies and the Germans nicknamed Jerries.
+7
level 67
Oct 13, 2017
Considering that war was so long ago and that those nicknames are primarily limited to british culture I'm not that surprised.
+3
level 76
Jun 15, 2018
^ Except that Tom and Jerry are internationally famous.
+4
level 70
Aug 27, 2018
I tried Hun and Bosch. Too many old boys' comics and annuals in my youth...
+2
level 73
Apr 23, 2019
^ This. In the 1st World War they were more often known as Huns, Boche (not Bosch, the electric goods company) and Feldgrau.
Jerry and Kraut are more WW2 nicknames. In that they are both common male names and a famous cat and mouse combo who waged their own personal WW3, the accepted answer makes the most sense.
Fritz, however, was common in both wars. And yes, he was a cartoon cat who starred in the first cartoon rated X in the USA.
+1
level 56
Jan 18, 2017
some britons in the second worldwar had a "jerry" (a pot) to piss in
+3
level 83
Oct 21, 2015
I couldn't understand the World Cup question. When I gave up I realized it said "modern olympics" not "mount olympus" as my brain interpreted it as, perhaps I should actually read the clues.
+2
level 83
Jul 1, 2016
Had a similar experience with Spartacus. Read it as the followers of Socrates, and couldn't remember them being killed...
+2
level 68
Nov 25, 2015
Had no idea what Schonbrunn meant... thought it was referring to the peace treaty of 1809. Those Austrians, palaces everywhere.
+1
level 35
May 13, 2016
The treaty is named after Schonbrunn Palace in which it was signed
+5
level 83
Jul 1, 2016
And the analogy still works there. Probably the most famous treaty signed in Austria, and the most famous one signed in France is probably the one signed in Versailles.
+1
level 72
Jan 10, 2016
I always mess up and spell "Yugoslavia" as "Yugoslovia". Dang it.
+1
level 62
Mar 24, 2016
Perfect level of difficulty. I ot 11/20
+1
level 80
Mar 28, 2016
The VE/VJ day question really confused me. I thought it was looking for a continent. I tried Asia, East Asia, Oceania, Australia, etc. before I even considered typing a country when the comparison would logically be a continent
+2
level 77
May 27, 2016
Not at all. VE is victory in Europe and VJ is victory in (or over) Japan.
+1
level 66
Jul 1, 2016
In the US Navy, V-J Day is officially celebrated as "Victory in the Pacific" Day.
+1
level 21
Apr 23, 2019
Australia is a country and a continent
+1
level 41
Apr 23, 2019
Nice, what about it. Also, now the continent is more often called Oceania to include the smaller islands and Papua New Guinea.
+1
level 76
Apr 1, 2016
Just wondering, shouldn't it be Washington DC, also isn't it Macau not Macao?
+1
level 66
Jul 1, 2016
"Macao" is an older traditional Portuguese spelling. "Macau" is the currently accepted Portuguese spelling. The newer "Macau" is slightly more common in English, but both are officially considered acceptable by the Chinese government of Macau. When I was there, about 70% of the street and business signage used the spelling Macau
+1
level 83
Jul 1, 2016
Agreed, when I lived there in 01, Macao was favored by the older Macanese with Portuguese descent, but Macau was more often used.
+2
level 37
Apr 11, 2018
Washington is the city, DC (District of Colombia) is the administrative division. "Washington, DC" is equivalent to "Ottawa, Ontario".
+3
level 73
Apr 23, 2019
No, Ontario is 1,000 times bigger than just Ottawa. The city of Washington now encompasses every square molecule of the District of Columbia.
+1
level 60
Jul 1, 2016
2:10 remaingn! Like a boss!
+1
level 73
Apr 23, 2019
3:38 left with no auto correct or predictive text and I suck at typing.
You're fired.
+3
level 54
Apr 24, 2019
Does it look like the guy you replied to has autocorrect?
+1
level 51
Jul 1, 2016
I will probably be quickly rebuked here, but could Amish be accepted for Pennsylvania as well? That was the first one I thought of
+2
level 61
Jul 1, 2016
I tried that too. I think the difference is that, at least according to traditional lore, the colonies of Massachusetts and Pennsylvania were "founded" by Puritans and Quakers, respectively. Pennsylvania is named after William Penn, an influential Quaker who established the colony there.
+1
level 77
Jul 1, 2016
This was not too hard. Only missed Jerry and Versailles. And only missed Versailles because I had no idea what Schonbrunn was.
+4
level 73
Apr 23, 2019
The world traveller? For shame.
+1
level 77
Apr 23, 2019
I'm sorry that I let you down. I got them all this time.
+3
level 66
Jul 3, 2016
Shouldn't Franz be an accepted answer as well as Jerry for the German soldier question? While the Americans typically used the term "Kraut", the british tended to use Jerry or Franz.
+1
level 48
Jul 3, 2016
I've never heard of Franz (Brit here) we do use Fritz which I tried and was accepted by the quiz.
+1
level 65
Oct 19, 2018
Yes. Fritz. In South Australia there was a lot of German migration long before Grofaz hit centre stage. Heidelberg. The wine-producing district known as the Barossa Valley. Barossa Valley! It is very close to 'Barbarossa'. They might have dropped 'bar' from the middle after June 22, 1941. 'Fritz' is what South Australians call devon.
+1
level 43
Jul 27, 2017
Delectable quiz
+1
level 71
Jan 28, 2018
I tried many alternatives (most of them unflattering) before I chanced upon 'Jerry'. Bad, bad me.
+2
level 62
Aug 14, 2018
The sitcom Good Times caused me to try dynomite several times. I like to think that's the reason I missed Versailles and Apollo.
+2
level 65
Oct 19, 2018
Jerry was WWII... Huns WWI... Jerry may have come later in WWI... I will check it out... don't wait up...
+1
level 57
Mar 9, 2019
I've been to both Schönbrunn and Versailles - beautiful places!
+1
level 79
Apr 23, 2019
Didn't understand Lindbergh and sat on it for at least 2 minutes before it clicked with 20 seconds to go.
+1
level 73
Apr 23, 2019
Lindbergh is to first person to fly a plane across the ocean alone, a real historic feat.
Earhart is to 100,000 other copilots to come before her. What was the name of all the other pilots who were always at the yoke beside her?
+1
level 77
Apr 23, 2019
what are you talking about? Earhart was the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic. Lindberg was the first man (and person) to do the same thing. Earhart did not have a copilot on her May 20, 1932 flight.
+1
level 73
Apr 23, 2019
Exciting. My bad. So she was the 10,000th solo pilot.
+3
level 77
Apr 24, 2019
She was the 1st female to fly solo across the Atlantic ocean. And she was only the 2nd person, of any gender, to do it. Nobody since Lindbergh had repeated his feat. Are you sucking on paint chips or something? Or are you just trying to say that being the first woman to do something that a man has already done is not significant? Which, okay, that might be a fair point if stated less vacuously, and if you could make the point without citing wildly inaccurate statistics you pulled out of your derriere, but it's also irrelevant to the quiz as the analogy is clear.
+1
level 77
Apr 24, 2019
and incidentally the name of the pilot of the flight when Earhart became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic (as a passenger) was Wilmer Stultz. And Earhart gave him all of the credit for this. "Stultz did all the flying — had to. I was just baggage, like a sack of potatoes. Maybe someday I'll try it alone," she said upon landing. 4 years later she did.
+1
level 67
Apr 24, 2019
@someone2018 - Yeah man, this is a weird and incredibly inaccurate hill to die on.
+1
level 79
Apr 23, 2019
I think Pacific should be an acceptable answer. It is referred to the Pacific theater 95% of the time, not the other theater.
+1
level 62
Apr 23, 2019
I find the Ferdinand and Isabella one too vague. There's lots of "Ferdinand" monarchs. Furthermore, the name's translated (hence the quotes), which adds to the confusion.
+1
level 77
Apr 23, 2019
Only one who famously ruled as co-monarch with his queen Isabella such that whenever you say his name it is almost always followed by "and Isabella."
+1
level 49
Apr 23, 2019
Surely there's another analogy that's actually about history (not Greek mythology in the Gemini/Mercury one).
+3
level 72
Apr 23, 2019
Nope. Fact - there are only 19 genuine historical analogies.
+1
level 62
Apr 23, 2019
I think that question is about the US space program, not Greek mythology (but it's the only one I missed, so I could be wrong!).
+1
level 67
Apr 24, 2019
Yes, that question is about the US Space Program. Project Mercury (flights from 1959-1963) aimed to put a man in orbit. Project Gemini (flights from 1964-1966) tested out space travel techniques in the relative safety of low Earth orbit. The Apollo program (flights from 1966-1972) took those techniques and used them to put men on the moon.
+1
level 65
Apr 23, 2019
I was able to breeze through this quiz for a RARE ace on the first try! I did get a little lucky, though- it accepts Fritz for the German soldier question. I had not heard Jerry before today. I like this site. I still get to learn something new even with a perfect score!
+1
level 54
Apr 24, 2019
Fun fact: There is a Versailles, Kentucky. But you must pronounce it "ver-SAILS"
+1
level 61
Apr 24, 2019
It would be nice if there was a short explanation afterwards.
+1
level 61
Apr 24, 2019
Especially since the scores are quite low. It is the best way to learn to see what connection you missed, some might click after seeing the answers but not all
+1
level 77
Jun 21, 2019
Which were you not able to piece together?