Take another quiz >

Irregular Plurals Quiz #1

Guess the plural forms of these words.
Some of these words can be pluralized by just adding an S. Be more creative!
Quiz by Quizmaster
Rate:
First submittedAugust 2, 2011
Last updatedMay 15, 2014
Times taken58,964
Rating4.65
4:00
Enter word here:
0
 / 24 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Singular
Plural
Calf
Calves
Chateau
Chateaux
Crisis
Crises
Moose
Moose
Nucleus
Nuclei
Court Martial
Courts Martial
Mouse
Mice
Matrix
Matrices
Singular
Plural
Genus
Genera
Radius
Radii
Seraph
Seraphim
Man
Men
Ox
Oxen
Child
Children
Axis
Axes
Millennium
Millennia
Singular
Plural
Stigma
Stigmata
Nebula
Nebulae
Phalanx
Phalanges
Potato
Potatoes
Poltergeist
Poltergeister
Alumna
Alumnae
Appendix
Appendices
Louse
Lice
+6
level 73
May 18, 2014
Great quiz. No wonder English is such a screwed up language.
+4
level 31
May 20, 2014
Nucleus, Radius, Appendix, Appendix, Axis, Matrix, Millennium, Nebula, Alumna and Genus are Latin. Poltergeist is German. Chateau is French Seraph and Phalanx are Greek.
+4
level 79
May 20, 2014
Which is exactly why English is such a "screwed up" language....we've taken a thing or two (or more) from virtually every other language and made it our own!
+3
level 67
May 20, 2014
Seraph is Hebrew
+3
level 31
Aug 27, 2014
Yes to be fair a lot of these are not irregular.
+1
level 62
Apr 14, 2015
Seraph is Hebrew... making it all the more embarrassing that I got it wrong
+1
level 55
Jul 1, 2015
I could be wrong, but I don't think millennium is Greek. The "ium" plural ending comes from Latin.
+1
level 73
Dec 11, 2015
With possibly one or two exceptions, I'm pretty sure you'll find them all in an English dictionary.
+1
level 58
May 19, 2016
seraph is actually hebrew
+1
level 35
May 20, 2016
As many people have said, Seraph is Hebrew, however it made it to English via Greek
+1
level 43
Feb 27, 2017
My friend at work called her daughter Seraphim. Didn't have the heart to tell her she'd pluralised the name. But she mostly calls her Sera.
+1
level 5
May 20, 2016
Wow most people don't like that
+1
level 67
Aug 30, 2017
It is the easiest language in the world to make yourself understood, but one of the hardest to be perfect in usage: But who needs to be perfect?
+1
level 65
Mar 28, 2018
The plural is more simple and regular in English than in may other languages. Most of these are foreign loan words where we have kept the original plural.
+1
level 61
Jun 13, 2019
the plural more simple and regualar than in many other languages? I am not claiming that I am fluent in all languages, but I wonder which you are talking about. If you said some, fine, I am sure that there are languagues that have weird plurals. But I dont think it is the majority
+2
level 77
May 20, 2014
got Poltergeister on a guess, judging from it's probable linguistic origin. good quiz. Not as easy as anticipated.
+1
level 77
May 21, 2016
This time I missed 2 that I got last time, including poultrygeist, but picked up 4 others I missed before. I guess that's progress of a sort.
+1
level 77
Feb 27, 2017
got them all this time.
+1
level 61
Jun 13, 2019
Poultrygeist, haha that's funny!
+1
level 68
Oct 1, 2018
As if one Poltergeist wasn't bad enough. Why on earth - or heaven - would you want several?
+1
level 54
Oct 1, 2018
Though poltergeists, a simple plural, is also accurate.
+1
level 38
Oct 12, 2018
Since Poltergeist is of German origin, one would think that the plural would be poltergeisters.
+6
level 67
May 20, 2014
A little bit of Latin in my life, a little bit of ancient Greek by my side, a little bit of German's what I need, a little bit of old English's what I see...
+1
level 77
May 20, 2014
And french.
+1
level 55
May 20, 2014
A prime example of where the LIKE button would be used :)
+1
level 62
Apr 30, 2015
Oh for a like button, that was brilliant
+1
level 37
Jan 5, 2018
Please tell me someone else sang that comment? ;)
+1
level 61
Jun 13, 2019
Well, I didnt sing... but did get the melody in my head while reading it :)
+1
level 38
Oct 12, 2018
^ There's a saying in my native language that when translated means: "My Mother is English, My Father is French, but I am Portuguese." - Quite apropos for this chain!
+1
level 76
May 20, 2014
Good one to get the brain working in the morning.
+1
level 63
May 20, 2014
I typed "Phalange" but didn't add the S! Thanks a lot, Phoebe Buffay.
+1
level 57
May 20, 2014
Very cool quiz! Hoping for a sequel!
+1
level 36
May 20, 2014
Can you please accept close spellings of millennia? I tried a million times and couldn't get it! Also would alumni not be a correct plural? Thanks :)
+1
level 49
May 20, 2014
The word millennium is right there in front of you. Couldn't anyone just copy the spelling and change the "um" to an "a"?? Why should different spellings be accepted?
+1
level 83
May 20, 2014
I'd argue that Courts Martial isn't an irregular plural, just a case where people often mistakenly try to pluralize the wrong word, similar to Eggs Benedict, Books of Mormon, etc.
+1
level 67
May 20, 2014
I was going to say the same thing. Except I would have used editors in chief as my example.
+1
level 29
May 23, 2014
Agree. Regular Plural. In compound nouns, you pluralise the principal word... Courts Martial.... other examples to the already mentioned.. Attorneys General, Governors General, Ladies in waiting, Passers-by, sons/daughters in law.
+1
level 72
Jul 24, 2014
And then there is the case of femmes fatales...
+1
level 24
May 20, 2014
Oh, how 4 years of of my beloved Latin helped! :)
+5
level 60
May 20, 2014
Fun fact: in olde english 'n' was used instead of 's' for plurals; hence oxen,children, brethren etc.
+2
level 76
May 20, 2014
Now THAT is a fascinating fun fact. I had no idea. Thank you, Glitschko56!
+1
level 53
May 26, 2014
Interesting! And some Scandinavian words still use 'n' for plural. Most use 'r', though, which got me through this with 100%!
+1
level 50
Jun 16, 2014
Here's another fun fact: In fact, in Olde English, there was no 'th' sound, so they used 'y' instead. So instead of Ye Olde... etc., like you see so often in pop culture, it's actually pronounced 'The Olde'...!
+1
level 59
Apr 1, 2016
It's not the sound, it's the letter. Thorn which became a Y for space saving in printing.
+1
level 66
May 19, 2016
Um, no. The letters thorn (Þþ) and edh (Ðð) were dropped from English centuries ago, but the sounds were still there. There used to be a T-V distinction in English (kind of like tú/usted in Spanish or tu/vous in French). Thou, thee, and thy were the informal and you, ye, and your were formal (and also plural, again, like French vous). But at some point we stopped using the informals except when talking to God, whereas in Icelandic we stopped using the formal þér ("thyer") and started using the informal þú ("thoo") for everyone. But there absolutely was a "th" sound in Old English, which you can see by reading Beowulf. "Hwæt! We Gardena in geardagum, þeodcyninga, þrym gefrunon, hu ða æþelingas ellen fremedon."
+1
level 38
Apr 21, 2018
Thank you, Smartcookie17. I never knew that. I learned the correct pluralization of those words (oxen, etc.) but never knew where they came from. It's easy to guess Latin, French and even Greek derivatives, but English ones are another matter.
+1
level 55
May 20, 2014
Would argue that some of these aren't really irregular at all, but still fun quiz. Studying linguistics helps.
+1
level 63
May 20, 2014
Plural of "potato" can be "potatos" or "potatoes". Same with "tomato".
+1
level 45
May 20, 2014
No, they can't be.
+2
level 44
May 22, 2014
Yeah, they can. With the E is better, but I've definitely seen both.
+1
level 52
May 24, 2014
NO THEY CAN'T!!! Just because you've seen them! Have you ever heard of the grocer's apostrophe?
+1
level 50
Jun 16, 2014
No, but I've heard of the baker's dozen! XD
+1
level 82
Apr 22, 2016
Greengrocer's apostrophe. Never heard it called just grocer's apostrophe.
+1
level 60
May 19, 2016
Only if your name is Dan Quayle.
+1
level 38
Oct 12, 2018
Mightythor: The plural of "potato" is potatoes, and of "tomato": tomatoes. You aren't related to Dan Quayle by any chance, are you?
+1
level 72
Jan 1, 2019
I came to the Comments just to see how many there would be for this. Not shabby I guess.
+1
level 35
May 20, 2014
Nice quiz!!
+1
level 52
May 24, 2014
Most of these words are not irregular at all, some are taken from a foreign language and some follow basic rules IE calf, potato. It should have contained more words of the "moose" variety, IE sheep, cannon, child etc.
+3
level 50
Jun 16, 2014
I always wished that it was 'meese'. More fun to say.
+1
level 54
May 25, 2016
And beeb.
+1
level 67
Jun 6, 2018
Not for nothing, but "moose" also comes from a foreign language. Algonquin, to be specific.
+1
level 43
Jul 16, 2014
I kept trying to put alumni. But I guess that is only the plural of alumnus.
+1
level 48
Apr 22, 2016
I was hoping the answer was "more than one poltergeist" ...haha...J/K! Fun quiz!
+1
level 47
Apr 22, 2016
Eeeaaasy, way too easy! 100% with 2:53 to go.
+1
level 70
May 19, 2016
"Court-martial" and "courts-martial" should both by hyphenated. In fairness, the answer box accepts "courts-martial" as a correct answer, but "court martial" without the hyphen is INcorrect.
+1
level 67
Oct 1, 2018
Jetpunk ignores all punctuation in the answer box, so there would be no way to mark "courts martial" incorrect while keeping "courts-martial" correct.
+1
level 61
Jun 13, 2019
It is not impossible to use punctuation on jetpunk, so the answer could still be displayed with the hyphen in the answerbox..
+1
level 67
May 19, 2016
Auto correct is a great cheat for this quiz...
+1
level 35
May 20, 2016
Phalanx should be changed, it has two meanings, a finger bone, for which the plural is Phalanges, and a regiment of infantry in an ancient Greek army, for which the plural is Phalanxes. At the very least, Phalanxes should also be accepted
+1
level 32
May 21, 2016
100% with 3:07 remaining! I find it odd that more people got mice than men or children.
+1
level 48
May 21, 2016
For anyone who speaks french chateau/chateaux is anything but irregular
+1
level 60
Jun 29, 2016
The plural is MEESE! You know what's bull?! Word pronounciations. I hate silent letters too. Anyone who objects, shut up and suck our coxen!
+1
level 61
Jun 13, 2019
lmao, not sure if you are really mad or not, but the coxen made me laugh
+1
level 17
Oct 25, 2016
100% 1st go
+1
level 67
Aug 30, 2017
Did anyone think of the Movie "Vice Versa" (1988) where there is an argument as to the plural of Moose being Mice?
+1
level 23
Dec 3, 2017
Chateau is fully French I don’t think it would/should be in an English dictionary
+1
level 60
Jun 1, 2018
Why not? It's used in the English language.
+1
level 67
Oct 1, 2018
And yet, there it is. English would lose a startling amount of its vocabulary if we eliminated words that were pilfered from other languages.
+1
level 61
Jun 13, 2019
Most languages are full of loanwords, some get adapted others stay just as they are.
+1
level 38
Apr 11, 2018
Also milleniums is permissable according to grammarist.com/plurals/millennia-vs-millenniums/
+1
level 24
Jun 6, 2018
Potatoes aren't even Irregular plurals.
+1
level 56
Oct 1, 2018
If it was a regular plural, the proper spelling would be potatos (no E).
+1
level 61
Jun 13, 2019
Not bad ! Only missed seraphim and genera, and seraphim is a "duh-moment" when I see it. Genera does not look familiar at all!

Cool quiz :)