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K Vocabulary Words Quiz #1

Guess these vocabulary words that start with the letter K.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: October 29, 2017
First submittedOctober 6, 2012
Times taken43,778
Rating4.10
5:00
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Definition
Word
Scottish skirt for men
Kilt
Hotel for dogs
Kennel
Mongolian ruler
Khan
Norse sea monster
Kraken
Oven used to bake pottery
Kiln
Loose Japanese robe
Kimono
What blue whales eat
Krill
Type of large seaweed
Kelp
Young goat
Kid
Japanese suicide bomber
Kamikaze
To bow deeply, touching
one's forehead to the ground
Kowtow
Definition
Word
Israeli commune
Kibbutz
Person who spoils all the fun
Killjoy
The main speech of a conference
Keynote
To punish by dragging under a ship
Keelhaul
Person who steals compulsively
Kleptomaniac
Relatives
Kin
German emperor
Kaiser
Toy musical instrument
Kazoo
Small rounded hill
Knoll
Backpack
Knapsack
British spelling of curb
Kerb
+3
level 64
Oct 5, 2012
knob (nb) A prominent, rounded hill or mountain.
+1
level 67
Nov 30, 2014
I tried Kop for hill, my time in South Africa I suppose!
+1
level 70
Jun 7, 2017
Ha! I thought of that too, but due to being a Liverpool supporter.
+1
level ∞
Oct 29, 2017
Knob and kop are not perfect, but close enough. We'll accept those now.
+5
level 75
May 21, 2018
Haha knob
+1
level 44
Oct 5, 2012
Jeez, 64% got "krill". I didn't have a clue, although now I see it, I admit it kinda rings a bell. But 26% got "keelhaul" - I have definitely never seen/heard that word before. This was one of my more embarrassing showings.
+4
level 83
Oct 5, 2012
64% of people saw "Finding Nemo". Krill feature prominently. :)
+5
level 83
May 21, 2013
and by "prominently" he means "showed up in one scene, lasted about 3 seconds."
+2
level 50
Aug 10, 2014
'Oh look! Krill!'
+2
level 83
Dec 22, 2015
Yep, that would be one of the three seconds.
+2
level 77
Mar 12, 2015
Keelhaul before Zod!! Oh wait... that's not what he said... what was it again... ? Oh, that's right, the more obvious answer. ;-)
+1
level 67
May 21, 2018
I think you meant kowtow xD
+1
level 66
Oct 5, 2012
Um, dogs are bred in kennels. And isn't kneel a type of bow?
+2
level 66
Oct 22, 2012
But dogs are also housed in kennels. More specifically if you're going on holidays you would take your dog to a "boarding kennel".
+1
level 67
May 23, 2018
I've kenneled my dog many times; never for breeding purposes.
+1
level 62
Aug 6, 2019
I ve never heard of a dog being bred in a kennel ":O I guess that's language barrier, I've only heard it being used in english the same way we use it here. Like when you go on holiday.

The only terms I have heard in relation to breeding is puppy mills and breeder. (and yes I suppose they have to have housing, but never heard a specific term in relation to that)> I am not saying that kennel is not used for that, just that I have not ome across it myself.

+2
level 73
Feb 8, 2013
Thank you Ian Anderson for the spelling of Kerb. The liner notes in Thick as a Brick 2 have "kerb" as one of the lyrics of a song. I had to look it up, but now i'll never forget it.
+3
level 47
May 28, 2014
A kilt is not a skirt!
+2
level 55
Jan 18, 2018
Agreed 100%
+1
level 67
Jan 14, 2019
"Skirt:..... An outer garment fastened around the waist and hanging down around the legs" ......... That sounds like a kilt to me.
+1
level 62
Aug 6, 2019
it fits that description but also not really. A kilt really isnt a skirt like most people think, the original ones are worn over the shoulder (with indeed also a part around the waist hanging down)> But isnt just a "circular" thing around the waist like skirts. But more similar to things like sari. Belted around the waist but a lot of fabric above the waist which is gathered together on the left shoulder.

The ones people think of now with the word kilt is "little kilt" which is a relatively new invention. a couple of centuries after the full sized one. For practical reason.

Sorry for this incoherent comment. My mind is scattered today.. (fever)

+1
level 62
Aug 6, 2019
a kilt is a kilt and shouldnt normally be called a skirt but specifically a kilt. BUT if you have to describe the type of clothing it is, well... none of the other fit.
+1
level 47
Jun 13, 2014
I missed keynote and kazoo! Waaaah!
+2
level 42
Mar 12, 2015
Accept 'kitbag' for backpack?
+1
level 54
Mar 16, 2015
I could not come up with "knapsack" to save my life. Instead I tried all variations of nonsense words before discovering my new favorite, "knickknacksack."
+2
level 71
Dec 29, 2017
I don't think kerb is a British spelling of curb, I think they're two different things. You curb something (like your enthusiasm), whichever side of the Atlantic you're on. You try not to drive over the kerb (which is the edge of the sidewalk - which Brits often confusingly call the pavement). Kerb may be little used in the States, but I don't think it's spelled curb there.
+7
level 51
Dec 30, 2017
the edge of the sidewalk is definitely called the curb in the U.S.
+2
level 79
May 21, 2018
Correct. Kerb (confusingly spelled curb in the US) is the edge of the pavement (confusingly called sidewalk in the US). Curb is to restrain or keep in check (used both sides of the pond).
+1
level 67
May 21, 2018
Well, we have different words, which can get confusing, but the way you've explained it, I guess a curb restrains cars from driving on the pavement to the side of a road, on which people walk?
+1
level 67
Jan 26, 2019
The original meaning of the word "curb" (from the late 1400s and spelled that way) was "strap passing under the jaw of a horse," attached to the bit and used to restrain the horse. That led to the verb form of the word, meaning to "bend to one's will, hold in check" in general (1520s). By 1775, that eventually led to the term "curbstone," which was a stone placed against the edge of earthwork to keep it from spreading, which is what modern curbstones (now shortened back to just "curb") do: keep the pavement of the road from spreading. [Source]

The spelling variation "kerb" or "kirb" dates back to about the 1660s, so the American spelling is the original, and the British spelling is the variant.

Oh, and what's confusing about the word "sidewalk"? It's where people walk along the side of the road. "Pavement" would be confusing to us, since it can refer to the street itself as well.
+1
level 62
Aug 6, 2019
@marlowe have you read the original comment? Roger was simply responding to officerdibble and duplicating his remark back to him.

Simply put, curb comes from (the origin of) curve and is used to represent deflection. (Changing the original direction and send it off in a different one)

+2
level 41
May 21, 2018
Please unaccept klepto for kleptomaniac. That's ridiculously forgiving.
+3
level 76
May 21, 2018
People often use that shortened version of the word, so I don't see the problem.
+1
level 67
Jan 26, 2019
Yeah, I can find examples of "klepto" being used as a noun meaning "kleptomaniac" from 1970, with varying sources dating it to 1953 (though I can't find a source for that), and once source that dates it as far back as 1919 (though again, I can't find a primary source.) But... yeah, at bare minimum it's been used for nearly 50 years, so I think it's a perfectly acceptable write-in.
+1
level 62
Aug 6, 2019
weird that pyro for pyromaniac isnt as common. I personally havent heard it being used anyway, but I have heard the word klepto. (though I didnt like it being accepted either, cause at the time I only had the full word in mind so it was an unpleasant surprise haha)
+1
level 44
May 21, 2018
Dogs live in kennels, thus it's their home. Not a hotel.
+1
level 58
May 21, 2018
No, the kennels are the canine equivalent of a cattery. It's where you leave your dogs if you'll be away from home or unable to care for them properly for a while, if you can't get friends or family to dogsit
+1
level 62
Aug 6, 2019
I would hope that dogs live in houses... being in a kennel or bench all your life would be a sad thing...
+1
level 76
May 24, 2018
Somebody else tried 'kneel' for bowing? couldn't think of anything else...
+1
level 65
May 26, 2018
Kneeling has more to do with placing your knee or knees on the floor. Bowing would be bending your head or body downward. Kowtowing requires both kneeling and bowing.
+1
level 60
May 24, 2018
Anybody care to figure out how many languages are the source of these answers? Without effort, I can find English, German, Japanese, Chinese, Norwegian, Mongol (?), Greek, Hebrew & American. Have you set a personal record, QM?
+1
level 62
Aug 6, 2019
And dutch, for knapsack and keelhaul
+1
level 73
Jun 5, 2018
"Toy musical instrument" is a very vague clue (as is shown by the low percentage of people getting it right). Maybe be more specific? Or accept more answers, like keyboard or klaxon, which can both be toys?
+1
level 67
Jan 14, 2019
How about giving all the correct answers along with the questions and quiz takers tick a box if they agree with the answer?
+1
level 62
Aug 6, 2019
yea I had issues with that too. kidguitar, kid-drums, kidspiano etc.

I couldnt think of a reason why one item would be considered a toy musical instrument and others wouldnt. they are all to have fun right. Maybe as a clue "up the ..... " instrument that makes a noise..

+1
level 30
May 20, 2019
My dictionary says kraken is a greek sea monster.
+1
level 62
Aug 6, 2019
really?!?! I wonder which dictionary that is. The kraken comes from norwegian lore and is always placed at the sea off the coast of norway (or more towards iceland) even when described later by people from other origins.

"Maybe the movie clash of the titans has muddied the waters, but up untill that point no references are made to greek mythology"

+1
level 62
Aug 6, 2019
I hope you read this and reply, trying to do a search to see which dictionary would have this. I am curious