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Name That Punctuation Quiz

We give you the punctuation mark, you tell us what it is called.
More generally, these are typographical symbols - not necessarily "punctuation"
Last updated: August 27, 2018
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Mark
Name
,
Comma
.
Period
'
Apostrophe
!
Exclamation Point
?
Question Mark
:
Colon
;
Semicolon
&
Ampersand
Mark
Name
/
Slash
\
Backslash
-
Hyphen
^
Caret
Dagger
~
Tilde
Interrobang
"
Quotation Mark
Mark
Name
...
Ellipsis
«
Guillemet
{
Brace
@
At Sign
Bullet
Pilcrow
©
Copyright
£
Pound
+1
level ∞
Apr 28, 2013
Expanded!
+1
level 20
Nov 23, 2014
Got all with 0:31 remaining and I'm 13...beat that English teachers!!!!!
+1
level 70
Oct 13, 2015
OH good for you!
+2
level 65
Oct 13, 2015
Got all what? Did you mean " Got all the answers" or "Got them all"? It's pretty ambiguous as to what all is. I thought maybe you went out and bought some All laundry detergent at 31 minutes after midnight. So, before you go calling out English teachers, you might want to proof read your statement before posting.
+1
level 58
Oct 13, 2015
I really don't think you should be bragging...for one thing you could be lying, and for another I'm 11 and I got each answer with 45 seconds left. No need to brag about knowing the names of punctuation, brag about knowing each and every world capital. :-({ })
+1
level 51
Oct 13, 2015
Don't worry about Biggie, it wasn't ambiguous to anyone with basic literacy skills and the ability to understand context :)
+1
level 53
Oct 15, 2015
You tell 'em! Adults will never understand you! 4EVAR YUNG!
+1
level 64
Jun 17, 2018
Biggie Smalls was a terrible grammarian. I am surprised you idolize him.
+1
level 31
Mar 19, 2018
How Did You Get Bullets | Daggers | Interrobang | Copyrights & , Guillemets. You Could add 'Angle Brackets' (<>) Parentheses (()) Brackets ([]}) Underscore (___) Dash (_) Dollar ($) Asterisk (*) Percentage (%) Vertical bar (||) Oxford commas (comma after and) Inverted Commas ("") & , Pipe (|). Those Are The Developments. Cool Quiz. Why do you Now Everything. You could one of my quizzes Genius only [Comment] Quiz Name: Fast Typing AAAA-ZZZZ 15 Second sprint. Do You Know Minecraft Is Better Than Roblox.
+1
level 60
Oct 7, 2018
Suspension dots and ellipsis are the same.
+2
level 56
May 8, 2013
I tried 'circumflex' for 'caret'. I'm not sure if there's a difference.
+1
level 33
May 15, 2013
Me too.
+1
level 18
Jul 16, 2013
In French, that's the 'accent circonflex' (I think that's how you spell it - maybe the way Remster did) anyway, this is different I think...
+1
level 35
Jan 4, 2014
I believe it's called a "circumflex" when placed over another letter and a "caret" when used on its own.
+1
level 19
Mar 22, 2014
I'm sleepy and spelled it carrot, haha.
+1
level 48
Jan 30, 2016
I'm not and did anyway.
+1
level 49
Jan 22, 2015
dunno what that is but my dad is an editor and he called those carets lol
+2
level 66
May 12, 2015
I've always known it as a circumflex too :\
+4
level ∞
Jul 8, 2015
Circumflex will work now
+2
level 75
May 12, 2013
I teach English and I don't think I've heard of the bottom three.
+1
level 56
May 15, 2013
What are you counting as the bottom three?
+1
level 75
Jan 1, 2014
The three least-guessed answers: interrobang, dagger, and guillemet. I've also studied Spanish and don't recall ever seeing a guillemet before. Daggers I have seen used as markers for footnotes similar to asterisks or superscript numbers, just didn't know what they were called. Interrobang I had never heard of nor seen before.
+1
level 49
Jan 22, 2015
interrobang made me laugh when i missed it and read the name in red lol
+1
level 67
Jan 16, 2016
P'tang, Yang, Kipperbang
+1
level 61
Mar 8, 2016
I actually use the interrobang all the time in SMSs and emails - though, I've had to create shortcuts for them, because they're not ordinary punctuation. Dagger I just knew, don't know why. But, guillemet I only knew because I speak French. No idea they were used in English also.
+2
level 65
May 30, 2016
"Guillemet" is a standard French word.
+1
level 50
Jun 7, 2016
I happened to come across an interrobang before while wandering Wikipedia. I've seen a guillemet in Spanish, but I didn't know what it was called.
+2
level 44
Apr 24, 2014
"Guillemet" is the French quotation mark. :)
+1
level 48
Jul 23, 2014
Russian uses these as well.
+1
level 65
Feb 23, 2016
I feel like the interobang is a really useful one. I'm a little disappointed that it isn't used more widely. There are so many situations where I use "!?" why not just put them together?
+1
level 32
May 15, 2013
Uhm I feel as dumb as in school ;) But nice new words for me like ampersand and dagger
+1
level 37
May 15, 2013
I seriously missed bullet???
+1
level 30
May 16, 2013
Don't feel bad...it looks like a lot of people did...
+1
level 40
May 16, 2013
i kept saying decimal
+1
level 51
May 20, 2013
Another term for dagger is 'obelus'. Came to mind first for some reason.
+1
level 35
Sep 6, 2013
The one that came to my mind was "obelisk" (yet another term for the same symbol), but it wasn't accepted.
+1
level ∞
Jan 5, 2018
Obelus will work now.
+2
level 55
Jun 27, 2013
You may want to consider allowing interpunct for bullet. I know they're distinct symbols, but the only real difference between them is size, and it's kind of hard to tell which one it is without context.
+1
level 58
Oct 25, 2017
I second that motion
+2
level ∞
Jan 5, 2018
Interpunct will work now
+2
level 29
Sep 8, 2013
Quotation marks are also known as Expression marks
+2
level 19
Dec 8, 2013
Why is hyphen not included?
+2
level ∞
Jan 5, 2018
Added hyphen
+1
level 72
Jan 6, 2018
Why is dash not included? ;)
+1
level 34
Feb 9, 2014
On Wikipedia, the guillernet (<<) is shown as a "non-English quotation". Perhaps you could accept this answer as well?
+1
level 59
Oct 14, 2015
Ooh! Ooh! Yes! I knew what it was.....just not what it was officially called.
+1
level ∞
Jan 5, 2018
French quotation will work now
+1
level 73
Jan 17, 2018
Also used in German, though not exclusively, and I believe they're reversed.
+1
level 14
Mar 11, 2014
maybe add 'dot point' for bullet point. generally known as that in australia
+1
level 61
Jan 17, 2018
As an Australian, I am ashamed by this comment. I've lived here most of my life (some 35 years or so) and I have never heard such idiocy.
+1
level 48
Apr 2, 2014
You should add Hyphen, Dash, Underscore, Bracket, Parenthesis, Forward Slash, Asterisk, Number/Pound Sign, and whatever the | is.
+2
level 68
Oct 13, 2015
So every quiz should include every possible answer which fits the category !? (My keyboard does not have an interrobang.)
+1
level 59
Oct 14, 2015
But really, what is the | called? The.....line? the board? The.....up and downer thingy? I think that's probably it.
+1
level 62
Apr 4, 2014
I only missed ellipsis. I am a bit mad at myself.
+26
level 75
Apr 6, 2014
"Interrobang"? I swear, that sounds like the title of cop-based porno.
+3
level 70
Apr 19, 2014
YAY
+1
level 38
Jun 4, 2014
lol
+3
level 59
Oct 14, 2015
I read your username as "Squeals" and it just made this comment thread too real for a second.
+2
level 49
Jan 22, 2015
least I wasn't the only person that had weird thoughts on that one lol
+2
level 52
Apr 29, 2014
I didn't know the word "guillemet", though I have certainly seen them in foreign-language novels, used a bit like we use quotation marks. Speech is often indicated by a new line of text, preceded by the guillemet.
+2
level 77
May 24, 2014
Guillemets are simply french quotation marks. That's all.
+4
level 24
Jul 18, 2015
They are also used in Spanish literature
+1
level 72
Jan 6, 2018
And many other European languages
+2
level 66
May 30, 2014
Stoked to recognise interrobang: best punctuation mark
+3
level 59
Oct 13, 2015
If it ain't on the keyboard, it don't exist.
+2
level 23
Feb 5, 2017
That's an awfully narrow-minded way to look at it ...
+1
level 42
Jun 10, 2014
You should take interpunct for bullet since out of context they are indistinguishable.
+1
level 48
Jul 23, 2014
What about 'dash' and 'hyphen' and 'asterisk' ?
+1
level 68
Oct 13, 2015
Refer to my earlier comment, please.
+1
level 70
Nov 5, 2014
Everyone should use interrobangs.
+5
level 56
Feb 6, 2015
I've heard guillemet called chevron. Can that be accepted?
+3
level 71
Apr 4, 2015
Seconded. I have regularly heard it called a chevron
+1
level 65
Mar 26, 2015
Please accept curly bracket for brace, because that's what it's called in unicode.
+1
level ∞
Jan 5, 2018
Okay
+1
level 37
Apr 21, 2015
Guillemet is in French mainly for mainly quotation
+1
level 74
May 15, 2015
No umlaut (double dots over a, o, or u in German)? :)
+1
level 66
May 24, 2015
Bullets are called dot points in Australia.
+1
level ∞
Jul 8, 2015
Dot point will work now.
+4
level 55
Jul 1, 2015
I object to "squiggly" and "dotdotdot" not being accepted. ;)
+1
level 21
Aug 12, 2015
Nice quiz, learnt some new terms, 'tilde', 'interrobang', and 'pilcrow'. Would someone care to enlighten me on where interrobangs and pilcrows are used?
+1
level 67
Oct 18, 2015
Read the first few comments!
+1
level 66
Jan 18, 2018
The interrobang is exactly what it looks like: a combination of a question mark and an exclamation point, for those questions you're also kind of excited or upset about. Since it doesn't exist on keyboards, you nearly always see it rendered as "?!" or similar. The pilcrow (which, I knew what it was for but only now learned its proper name) is a copy-editing symbol that means "Start a new paragraph here."
+1
level 76
Oct 13, 2015
I got it after a moment, but there's also something called the 'interpunct' that looks very similar to a bullet, and is more of a punctuation mark than a bullet is.
+1
level 67
Oct 13, 2015
It's used in Catalan to distinguish between ll (which sounds like "LY" as in million) and l·l (which sounds like double "L"). The word for collection, col·leció, has an interpunct. Also, only in the United States and possibly Canada is { a brace. In the UK and Australia it's called a curly bracket.
+1
level 58
Oct 13, 2015
13% of people who use the internet - as they are on here - do not know what the '@' sign is. Frightening.
+2
level 77
Oct 13, 2015
"At sign" is such a flat name that it is easy to miss. By comparison, in French, we call it "arobase".
+1
level 59
Oct 14, 2015
Yes--I put "at" because that's all I know it as, but I'm sure people saw things like the ampersand (which many people only know as the "and sign"), and then assumed @ had a much more complicated name than "at sign." Like, I'm still kinda convinced it probably does.
+1
level 35
Jan 20, 2018
I'm the same, I thought "What's the official name for the at sign?"
+4
level 52
Apr 27, 2017
I propose allowing other country's names for the @ sign...mostly because I want 'monkey's tail' to be an acceptable answer.
+1
level 19
Oct 13, 2015
Aha look at you second person who talked. By the third person who talked you just got ambiguity-fyed by him. Talk about Ambiguty, you stink at propaganda if u play.
+1
level 20
Oct 13, 2015
I looked on Yahoo XD
+1
level 52
Oct 17, 2015
The interrobang doesn't show on my computer. I only saw a box, and had no idea what to call it!
+2
level 26
Nov 20, 2015
I own Oxford English dictionaries and personally feel that this quiz is utter trods wollop....
+2
level 67
Jan 16, 2016
Did you find 'Trods Wollop' in your dictionaries?
+1
level 67
Jan 16, 2016
I had never heard of a Guillemet before, but I do know a Guillemot when I see one.
+2
level 56
Feb 5, 2016
Shouldn't "chevron" also work for guillemet? That's how I've always called them
+1
level 2
Jun 26, 2016
Never heard of the bottom 3
+1
level 59
Sep 16, 2016
dont even have a hyphen in this quiz
+2
level 70
Sep 19, 2016
Interrobang: room where Australian police take you to get the truth out of you.
+1
level 67
Feb 18, 2017
In Microsoft Word the Pilcrow is shown as 'Paragraph'. I tried 'Corporal' for Interrobang.
+5
level 75
Feb 18, 2017
Paragraph was accepted when I tried it.
+1
level 63
Mar 6, 2017
What is the dagger for, exactly?
+1
level 72
Jan 6, 2018
A dagger, obelisk or obelus ( † ) is a typographical symbol usually used to indicate a footnote if an asterisk has already been used. (Wikipedia )
+1
level 61
May 15, 2017
What is a pilcrow, interrobang, dagger, and guillermet used in? Does somebody know?
+1
level 57
Jan 17, 2018
Pilcrows are used to show where new paragraphs start, interrobang is basically the same as when you use ?! (to show disbelief or shock), dagger is used in disclaimers, headers, footnotes, etc., and guillemets are used as quotation marks in other languages, mainly French.
+1
level 38
Jun 3, 2017
Isn't that the Euro not the Pound?
+4
level 53
Jun 17, 2017
It is the pound. This is Euro: €
+1
level 75
Jan 17, 2018
Someone should do a quiz on currency symbols. It would be hard but a good learning experience.
+1
level 17
Jun 6, 2017
too upset to miss backslash of all things... I always just called it "slash" :(
+1
level 58
Jan 17, 2018
I have always heard that one is a forward slash and the other is a back slash.
+1
level 21
Aug 20, 2017
I forgot bullet... I've used the caret before, but I had no idea what it was called. Come to think of it, I've used all of these before (except the dagger... and interrobang because it's not on my keyboard and my friends would just think I'm pretentious lol)
+1
level 37
Oct 25, 2017
When you think you know a lot, you keep learning new things taking these quizzes! ~^{}[]:"/>
+1
level 28
Nov 14, 2017
If you find this quiz easy, try the harder version here
+1
level 23
Nov 17, 2017
I kept saying dash instead of backslash
+1
level 28
Nov 24, 2017
I kept saying multiplication symbol, times symbol, didn’t know it was bullet.
+1
level 28
Nov 24, 2017
You should accept open curly bracket for brace.
+1
level 16
Nov 24, 2017
WHAT IN THE WORLD IS A INTERROBANG!?
+1
level 76
Jan 5, 2018
It's a cross between the two punctuation marks that you just used.
+1
level 75
Jan 17, 2018
Nice one, Lawnmower.
+1
level 57
Nov 24, 2017
I tried cout() for gullernet but it didn't work. As for bullet, they are not necessarily round. I don't see how that can qualify. It merely depends on the limitations of the software and in html you can format bulleted lists to be graphics, so they can be anything you want really.
+2
level 51
Nov 24, 2017
Only got 36%... but at least I got guillemet so I have that going for me, which is nice.
+1
level 58
Dec 4, 2017
I couldn't spell Ampersand.
+1
level 75
Jan 9, 2018
I don't know if it is colloquial or not but I would refer to the guillemet as angle quotes.
+1
level 46
Jan 17, 2018
QM, can you add about or approximate for ~? Technically it's only a tilde if it's over a letter (I think?), which that symbol doesn't do when you type it out. Even if it is still a tilde, it's also used to say that a number you've put is approximate, not definite.
+1
level 41
Jan 17, 2018
I was that 1% who didn't get comma :/
+1
level 63
Jan 17, 2018
The slash is also called a virgule. Will you accept that going forward?
+1
level 69
Jan 17, 2018
'virgule' is French for comma.
+1
level 58
Jan 17, 2018
Man they have big commas!
+1
level 66
Nov 25, 2018
I learned this in school - I learned it as the / in an and/or situation. I'm probably the only one but I put virgule first before I put slash :-) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slash_(punctuation)
+1
level 56
Jan 17, 2018
The slash is also known as an oblique.
+1
level 58
Jan 17, 2018
Or a division sign
+1
level 69
Jan 17, 2018
Although 'slash' is commonly used in the UK these days (mainly in the giving out of email addresses) I continue to prefer to use oblique, as 'slash' is UK English slang for urinate (as in "I need a slash"). I believe 'Solidus' is a more formal term that can also be employed. Those of us who can remember dictation as an activity in French classes might remember "Ouvrez les guillemets" as an instruction the teacher gives when asking students to open speech marks.
+1
level ∞
Jan 17, 2018
Oblique will work now
+1
level 56
Jan 19, 2018
I (a Brit) am familiar with 'solidus' too.
+1
level 52
Jan 17, 2018
Could you please allow Asperand for 'at sign', as I think that is the correct name.
+1
level 75
Jan 17, 2018
I had to look that up and you're correct, it is "one of the many names for the figure @". My new trivia fact for the day. Thank you, Trix.
+1
level ∞
Jan 17, 2018

It's not really standard usage. But if we are going to coin a new word for it, I prefer strudel.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/At_sign

"The fact that there is no single word in English for the symbol has prompted some writers to use the French arobase[3] or Spanish and Portuguese arroba, or to coin new words such as asperand,[4] ampersat[5] and strudel,[6] but none of these has achieved wide usage."

+1
level 57
Jan 17, 2018
I kind of feel like I shouldn't have gotten a couple because I know that a bracket and a brace are different but I still typed bracket. Also I misspelled ellipsis.
+1
level 28
Jan 17, 2018
The Hyphen could also be an "em dash" or possibly an "en dash"? One is longer than the other and I can't remember which. I'm sure someone in internet-land will put me right! Good quiz, I like it when I learn stuff as well as showing off what I know!
+1
level 20
Jan 18, 2018
FINALLY! 100%
+1
level 50
Jan 19, 2018
Good quiz, thank you, though (being picky here, sorry!) I don't believe they all actually qualify as punctuation. Some (the tilde) are diacritical marks dealing with pronunciation and others are editing marks. But fun nonetheless!
+1
level 60
Jan 20, 2018
I tried "lira" first for the pound sign, as that is where the name comes from (hence the L-like shape) and it's also used for currencies named lira
+1
level 59
Mar 15, 2019
In the Unicode standard, the symbol £ is called "pound sign" and the symbol ₤ "lira sign".
+1
level 31
Mar 14, 2018
Why don't you include Dollars , Vertical bar , Brackets , Parentheses , percentage and Angle Brackets
+1
level 64
Jun 17, 2018
I wrote "space" for the interrobang because that's all I see.
+1
level 32
Sep 11, 2018
guillemets are also used in chinese. they're for names of books.
+1
level 15
Dec 13, 2018
AWESOME QUIZ! Didn't get the double pointy brackets.