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Demonyms Quiz

What do you call people from these places?
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Enter answers in the area marked "Enter name for people here".

You can enter any answer, at any time - they don't have to be in order

Punctuation and capitalization don't matter on JetPunk.

A Person From
Is Called...
United States
an American
Netherlands
Dutch
Venice
a Venetian
Texas
a Texan
Philippines
a Filipino
Canada
a Canadian
Canada (slang)
a Canuck
Flanders
Flemish
Peru
a Peruvian
Indiana
a Hoosier
Paris
a Parisian
A Person From
Is Called...
Rome
a Roman
Moscow
a Muscovite
Troy
a Trojan
Iraq
an Iraqi
Spain
a Spaniard
Switzerland
Swiss
Berlin
a Berliner
Denmark
a Dane
Genoa
Genoese
Brittany
a Breton
Poland
a Pole
A Person From
Is Called...
London
a Londoner
New Zealand (slang)
a Kiwi
Liverpool
a Liverpudlian
Liverpool (slang)
a Scouser
Birmingham (slang)
a Brummie
Wales
Welsh
Los Angeles
an Angeleno
Cyprus
a Cypriot
Phoenix
a Phoenician
Naples
a Neapolitan
Michigan's UP
a Yooper
Answer Stats
A Person From
Is Called...
% Correct
Your %
+2
level 33
Jul 11, 2011
Can't believe I missed Dutch and Swiss...what was I thinking?
+1
level 7
Jul 12, 2011
you don’t call a person from the netherlands a ‘dutch’ they speak dutch, but i speak english and i am an american not a ‘english’ they don’t really have anything they are called.
+2
level 17
Jun 14, 2012
But you say they are dutch.
+3
level 73
Aug 15, 2013
Yeah...haven't you ever seen Goldmember? "There are two things I hate: People who are intolerant of other people's cultures...and the Dutch!"
+1
level 75
Apr 17, 2014
Yep, I had a neighbor from the Netherlands, and she had a bumper sticker that said, "If you ain't Dutch, you ain't much!" ;}
+1
level 65
Apr 7, 2016
@loganite That is my Dutch friend's favourite saying.
+1
level 73
Apr 24, 2014
You could call a person from the Netherlands a Dutchman.
+1
level 75
Apr 24, 2014
or a Dutchwoman ^^.
+1
level 25
May 1, 2014
what if he was a pilot?
+1
level 48
Jun 18, 2014
An airborne Dutchman?
+3
level 66
Jul 7, 2014
He would be the Flying Dutchman.
+1
level 34
Mar 24, 2016
@thecoolestdude2: Nice. :)
+1
level 73
May 7, 2016
And if he was a frycook?
+2
level 67
Mar 13, 2018
the Frying Dutchman!
+1
level 40
Apr 14, 2018
My 1st guess was Nederlander.
+1
level 39
May 29, 2018
Before political correctness set in, they were called "Dutchmen." - If there is no current designation, I guess it's because the politically correct police can't come up with an acceptable one. (Dutch man/ woman would engender the argument, "a dutch girl isn't a woman"). "Nederlander" is gender-neutral and, therefore, correct but is seldom used.
+1
level 30
Jul 27, 2011
Good quiz. I got 29. Can't believe I missed "Hoosier" and "Kiwi." Duh.
+1
level 53
Jul 29, 2011
@bingoseventeen... They are called the Dutch... or Dutch people... just like people from Switzerland speak Swiss and are known as the Swiss or Swiss people... The French speak French... The Japanese speak Japanese... (Some of) The Irish speak Irish... I wonder what you would call the Dutch? A Netherlander? A Hollandaise perhaps??
+2
level 2
May 30, 2012
people in switzerland don't speak swiss, that isn't a language, the speak french, german, and italian
+2
level 44
Aug 7, 2014
and Romansh
+2
level 57
Apr 7, 2016
As someone once said to me "Learn to speak American!".
+1
level 38
Jun 24, 2018
Romansch is sometimes referred to as Swiss.
+1
level 72
Feb 8, 2013
Well, it's Swiss German and Swiss Italian and Swiss French. Also, in case you ever see this, Slim316, your sauce joke was not los ton me.
+1
level 20
Sep 12, 2013
German, French, Italian and Romansch are the four official languages of Switerland. Swiss German isn't an official language, but a collection of spoken dialects that vary tremendously from place to place. Speakers switch to high German as needed, such as for official business or speaking to high German speakers. There isn't a Swiss French or Swiss Italian, though there are accent differences and the occasional vocabulary difference, but otherwise the languages are basically the same as in the bordering countries. Romansch is unique to Switerland. Signed, Former Swiss resident
+1
level 49
Apr 24, 2014
Actually, there is a Swiss French and a Swiss Italian. Although Swiss French is almost extinct and Swiss Italian is rarely used outside of family and friends. And the Swiss German isn't that different from each other.
+1
level 45
Sep 3, 2014
Hollandaise... You're killing me!
+1
level 65
Apr 7, 2016
For some reason I'm hungry now
+1
level 34
Mar 24, 2016
Hollandaise, ha ha!
+1
level 44
Mar 31, 2018
That logic doesnt always work... Indians dont speak "Indian" lol
+1
level 35
May 15, 2018
SOMEONE FINALLY KNOWS
+1
level 15
Aug 1, 2011
How about a Geordie from Newcastle? If we're going to be dealing with Glaswegians and two forms of Liverpudlians..
+1
level 18
Aug 4, 2011
An inhabitant of the Netherlands is called a Dutchman or a Dutchwoman. An inhabitant of Flanders is called a Fleming or a Belgian ;). Just look it up if you don't take my word for it :P.
+1
level 45
Feb 17, 2014
I did 'Belgian' too. Maybe a 1/2 point?
+2
level 75
Apr 24, 2014
Belgian must not be accepted. Fleming is the appropriate answer (they say "vlaming" in dutch).
+1
level 67
Apr 22, 2018
What about the French half of Belgium - what do they call themselves?
+1
level 39
May 29, 2018
Vlaanderen in Dutch.
+1
level 38
Jun 24, 2018
Walloons
+1
level 33
Aug 26, 2011
If it wasn't the obvious I missed, it was the weirdness that couldn't be gotten. Liverpudlian--really? Who knows this stuff but ultimate nerds?
+3
level 23
Aug 10, 2013
Nearly everyone in Britain knows a liverpudlian when they see one
+1
level 34
Apr 24, 2014
if someone is speaking, what you believe to be english and have no idea what they are saying they are from liverpool
+1
level 36
Apr 25, 2014
ikr lol
+1
level 44
Aug 7, 2014
So true!
+1
level 20
Dec 7, 2014
Nah, I wouldn't stoop so far as to call it English...
+1
level 28
Oct 19, 2015
Arron321. Maybe people can understand your accent - but you don't know how to use commas properly in sentences!
+1
level 38
Jun 24, 2018
A lot of Liverpudlians in the southern USA.
+1
level 45
Feb 23, 2015
I learned 'Liverpudlian' when I was 13, in 1964, just after the Beatles became the 8th wonder of the world. It was used to describe them in the media. I lived in remote Quebec at the time. I didn't know the slang terms for Liverpool and Birminham, though.
+1
level 73
May 7, 2016
Sounds like some strange type of person encountered by Gulliver in his travels.
+1
level 17
Aug 26, 2011
People from Halifax (Canada) are Haligonians. That's a good tricky one. Can "Angelino" be an acceptable spelling? I almost had it. Fun quiz!
+1
level 12
Aug 27, 2011
I've never heard of an "Angeleno" or a "Canuck" and I don't live in the UK and have never been there, so i didn't get "Liverpudlian" "Glasgwegian" or "Scouser"
+1
level 26
Sep 6, 2011
People from Glasgow are also called Weegies.
+1
level 48
Nov 4, 2016
WEEGIE
+1
level 27
Sep 15, 2011
Ithabise - Every Beatles fan knows that they're called Liverpudlians! :-)
+1
level 26
Oct 1, 2011
it should except scouse for scouser... we just call them the scouse from up there down here in the south lol!
+1
level 60
Jan 21, 2015
I second that - Please accept scouse
+1
level 28
Oct 19, 2015
Englishsiren. Well, I think Scousers would probably know the difference between "except" and "accept" and know which is the correct word to use in your sentence.
+1
level 65
Nov 4, 2016
Well said.
+1
level 44
Nov 7, 2011
We have a Newcastle in Australia as well, and those dudes are called Novocastrians, though I'm not entirely certain that's the correct spelling
+1
level 65
Nov 24, 2014
Someone from Newcastle England are called geordies' (why'I man)
+1
level 9
Nov 13, 2011
How does Yooper come about? I've never heard of it (nor Canuck) but I am English!! Got all the others though,very surprised..I must be an ultimate nerd Ithabise? (except I definitely am not) :-)
+1
level 48
Apr 16, 2016
Hi, lottie. Michigan is divided by the Great Lakes into two separate peninsulas of land. Most Michiganders live in the Lower Peninsula, the oven-mitt-shaped bit between Lake Michigan and (mostly) Lake Huron. The very rural, hunting-and-fishing-friendly Upper Peninsula, between Lake Superior and Lake Michigan, is called the U.P. ("Yoo-pee"), or sometimes just "the Yoop". Therefore, folks living in the U.P. are called "Yoopers".
+1
level 18
Dec 14, 2011
Lottie-- Yooper comes from it being Michigan's UP (You-p...blend together). Sometimes people from the U.P. refer to people from the L.P. as "trolls" because we live under the bridge, although I don't like that. And if you were a tourist to Mackinac Island you would be a "fudgie." :)
+1
level 18
Jan 20, 2012
GRINGO should be considered as slag for American!
+1
level 55
Apr 25, 2014
Gringo actually just means any white person, not necessarily an American
+1
level 44
Aug 7, 2014
Not white Mexicans though.
+1
level 41
Apr 21, 2015
Yankee could work though, though possibly New England specifically
+1
level 60
Sep 4, 2016
Yankee often refers to just the northern USA, though.
+1
level 50
Nov 4, 2016
Gringo does work for white Latin Americans, too.
+1
level 21
Jan 23, 2012
im so glad you put in the "yooper" reference but i got it wrong because im more used to saying it than spelling it :P The nickname "fudgie" is used i in more places around Northern Michigan than just the island, in the summer they're everywhere!
+1
level 20
May 11, 2012
Only got flemish 'cause my aunt's family is from Flanders
+1
level 1
Jun 1, 2012
ha i missed AMERICAN XD
+1
level 33
Jan 5, 2013
28/33. not bad
+1
level 73
Jan 15, 2013
Isn't "Genovese" the adjective and "Genoan" is the noun? I tried "Liverpooligan" because I had no idea what the real answer was. I think I like Liverpooligan better than Scouser.
+1
level 50
Apr 1, 2013
Essentially, these are Demonyms, both recognized & unofficial
+1
level 17
May 13, 2013
Well I am British and I know perfectly well I'm a Briton, I admit I tried Brit first because that's mostly what the Americans call us and this is an American site, when that didn't work I added the 'on' without a pause. When the prefix is 'a' then it can't be British.I'm from the NE, but I doubt its a regional thing.
+2
level 20
Dec 7, 2014
You do know Brittany isn't in Britain right?
+1
level 20
Apr 10, 2016
LOL
+1
level 73
Nov 4, 2016
Europeans are not very good at geography, trust me.
+1
level 56
Nov 4, 2016
I won't.
+1
level 73
Nov 4, 2016
Or... choose to be ignorant. That's another way to go.
+1
level 65
Nov 4, 2016
Never trust a person who says "Trust Me"
+1
level 54
Nov 4, 2016
Let's not trust you then!
+2
level 43
Nov 4, 2016
Yeah, that's true. I don't particularly think that it is very fair to say that Europeans are not very good at geography. I am also a Briton but that doesn't mean that I don't know that Brittany is in France, not another name for Britain. Honestly, I don't know, the comment just a sat a bit weird with me. Also we can't really trust you then can we. :)
+1
level 73
Nov 4, 2016
If you hypocrites saw a comment that Americans weren't good at geography you'd be standing up applauding. I used to object to such statements because I thought that Americans and Europeans were essentially equal in this regard. Then I spent the last two years traveling around Europe and the level of ignorance people here have about geography, even of their own continent, is simply shocking. I never encountered this back in the States.

But... whatever...
+1
level 38
Jun 24, 2018
I know you're English then because Scots, Welsh and Irish never use that term for themselves; it's an Englishman's contrivance.
+1
level 13
Jun 24, 2013
Didn't know any of the American ones.
+1
level 66
Sep 25, 2013
It would be cool if someone from Naples was a "Napoleon".
+1
level 74
Jun 18, 2015
I genuinely put that by accident because my brain was all stuffy.
+1
level 65
Feb 21, 2016
Stay off the brandy Buck.
+1
level 38
Jun 24, 2018
Napoleon brandy?
+1
level 55
Jan 12, 2014
Could I have "Troian" added as an alternative for "Trojan"?
+1
level 46
Apr 20, 2014
The adjective for Genoa is Genoese, not Genovese. I think you're confusing it with Genevese, the adjective for Geneva.
+1
level ∞
Apr 21, 2014
Fixed!
+1
level 67
Apr 24, 2014
Or Vito, the old Mafia Don.
+1
level 69
Apr 24, 2014
Got "Breton" thanks to remembering what the name was in French - Bretagne and Bretons. Stroke of luck that it was the same.
+1
level 42
Nov 4, 2016
I grew up there but somehow I read that as Great Britain and didn't even get it right :(
+1
level 76
Apr 24, 2014
Two small points: A Filipino refers to a male from the Philippines; a woman is called a Filipina. Second, I always thought people from Paris were called Parisites.
+1
level 73
Apr 24, 2014
Filipino can be men or women. Filipinas are just women. Standard gender bias in the Spanish language.
+1
level 34
Mar 24, 2016
Correct.
+2
level 75
Apr 24, 2014
It is Parisian. Anything else would be stupid since we all say "parisien" in French...
+1
level 65
Aug 16, 2015
Collect the bag marked (Sense of Humour) on your way out.
+1
level 66
Nov 4, 2016
+1 Mal
+1
level 50
Nov 4, 2016
hahaha +2 Mal
+1
level 67
Nov 4, 2016
So not "Parigot" then?
+1
level 67
Apr 24, 2014
i think pinoy should be accepted
+1
level 43
Apr 24, 2014
"Pinoy" would be slangy, like "Canuck" for Canadians.
+1
level 50
Jul 20, 2014
You do realize what Parisites sounds like, right?
+2
level 60
Nov 4, 2016
I think that was the joke.
+1
level 34
Mar 24, 2016
Parisites, ha ha!
+1
level 44
Apr 24, 2014
Maybe accept Cypriat as an alternative spelling? Thats what I tried anyway
+2
level 45
May 12, 2017
Why?
+3
level 31
Apr 25, 2014
I'm from LA and I never heard of an Angeleno
+2
level 20
Apr 20, 2015
Could you accept cynical asshole for Angeleno?
+1
level 2
Oct 5, 2017
It seems to work for you.
+1
level 68
Jun 24, 2016
You've got to be kidding me. I lived in Manhattan Beach for 11 years and heard it all the time. Especially on the news. Its VERY common.
+1
level 48
Nov 4, 2016
Former Angeleno, I know the expression well.
+1
level 57
Nov 4, 2016
I'm from New Zealand and I have heard of Angeleno.
+2
level 36
Apr 25, 2014
YOu should accept Philippino for Philippines
+2
level 34
Mar 24, 2016
No. Sorry, but it is never spelled that way by the Filipinos.
+1
level 57
Dec 14, 2017
Noone from Flanders calls it Flemish either, they'd call themselves a "Vlaming". Kind of weird reasoning to go by how they spell/call it themselves.
+1
level 24
Jan 5, 2018
how about pinoy?
+1
level 71
Apr 25, 2014
So not Jelly Doughnut?
+4
level 48
Nov 4, 2016
Ich bin eine Jelly Doughnut!
+2
level 56
Jun 7, 2017
Urban myth
+1
level 43
Apr 25, 2014
You should accept "Liverpuddlian" for people that hale from Liverpool.
+1
level 46
May 31, 2015
That would be hail....
+1
level 33
Jan 17, 2018
Hail not hale
+1
level 65
Feb 12, 2018
not when your stoned!
+1
level 24
May 13, 2014
Only 18% got "Hoosier." I only got it right because I am a hoosier myself, haha.
+1
level 34
Mar 24, 2016
That was the hardest for me because it sounds nothing like Indiana. :)
+1
level 28
May 25, 2017
I only got it cause of Parks & Rec
+1
level 28
Jul 7, 2014
i think im most proud that i got peruvian right :)
+1
level 18
Jul 10, 2014
As a Dutch person, we don't refer to ourselves as 'a Dutch,' or even a 'Dutchman.' In our native tongue, we refer to ourselves as 'Nederlanders' (Nederland is the Dutch word for the Netherlands). Like the German Berliner, -er refers to where a person comes from (ex., Amsterdammer). Hopefully that clears some stuff up :)
+2
level 56
Jun 7, 2017
But the quiz asks for the English words, not what the equivalent words are in the native language.
+1
level 39
Oct 5, 2017
So Filipino is an English word? - Your prejudice is blatant!
+1
level 65
Feb 12, 2018
So is your phobia
+1
level 40
Apr 13, 2018
Divantilya, Filipino IS an English word. Regardless of it's origins, Filipino is the proper name for a person from the Phillippines.
+1
level 60
Aug 6, 2014
What a great quiz! As a British person I knew the funny little British city ones, as a half Italian I knew Genovese (and thanks for accepting that) and as a lifelong student of the USA I got the rest. (I did have to look up the Michigan UP answer, but having already read about that place I did know it was something like Yoo-Pee-er..
+1
level 44
Aug 7, 2014
If you go to Purdue, Notre Dame or Butler you're not still a Hoosier, are you?
+1
level 66
Aug 7, 2014
Yuper should be accepted, and how is 'hoosier' not slang?
+1
level 46
May 16, 2017
Hoosier is like official. That is why my dude.
+2
level 56
Jun 7, 2017
Is like official? What does that mean? Either it is official or it isn't.
+1
level 65
Sep 21, 2014
aren't people from Spain called Spanish?? In Spanish we have the same word! (Español)
+2
level 48
Nov 4, 2016
The clue includes "a" before the answer. If you are 'Spanish' you are 'a Spaniard'.
+2
level 50
Nov 4, 2016
A Spanish guy or a Spaniard, a Polish guy or a Pole, a Danish guy or a Dane, a British guy or a Brit.
+1
level 59
Jun 5, 2017
Supertramp - it's really Briton - Brit is shorthand.
+1
level 69
Oct 20, 2014
I kind of knew it was a yooper, but couldn't get the spelling right, kept trying combinations with a U. No clue for those English nicknames.
+1
level 67
Nov 4, 2016
Yeah more spellings would be appreciated. I tried Yoper, Yuper, Yewper, Yupper, Eweper, Youper, Uper...
+1
level 22
Nov 21, 2014
Hong Kong would be a good addition. I didn't know that until recently.
+1
level 34
Mar 24, 2016
We sometimes call them "Hongkies." I know it's not correct, but it's easier to say than Hong Kongese or Hong Kongers.
+1
level 14
Nov 23, 2014
Only got Trojan cause i red a story about troy recently
+1
level 60
Nov 4, 2016
Was it about the Trojan horse, by any chance?
+1
level 24
Feb 20, 2018
Trojan isn't a good name for someone from troy because it means the same as a computer virus.
+1
level 40
Apr 13, 2018
You do realize that the virus name comes from the city, right? It's called a Trojan virus because of the Trojan Horse story.
+1
level 19
Dec 6, 2014
You had yooper for UP why not troll for LP? lol
+1
level 19
Dec 6, 2014
under the bridge (mackinaw) a troll lives under the bridge.
+1
level 21
Jan 16, 2015
anybody else got every one right? cause i did...not bragging or anything. Just saying! :)
+1
level 46
May 31, 2015
I did.
+1
level 16
Feb 1, 2015
O live in MI, but I've never heard the term "yooper"
+1
level 36
Mar 7, 2015
Can you accept spouse for liverpool(slang)
+1
level 46
May 31, 2015
Lol!!
+1
level 25
Mar 12, 2015
Scouse is a stew type dish, originally 'Labskause' brought to liverpool by sailors, renamed Lobscouse and subsequently shortened to Scouse. Scouser was originally the name given to people who ate the dish which later expanded to all Liverpudlians. I've also heard it called Lobby as well, but the may just be a regional variation
+1
level 52
Apr 10, 2015
Is it bad that I live in Michigan and have never heard anyone referred to as a Yooper?
+1
level 57
Aug 7, 2016
Well, I'd never heard of Yooper. But then, I live in New Zealand.
+1
level 65
Nov 4, 2016
Yeah, it's kind of bad.
+1
level 55
Aug 25, 2015
Can I have 'Moscovite' and/or 'Moscovian' for 'Muscovite'?
+1
level 66
Feb 28, 2016
Can you add 'Belgian' for Flanders?
+1
level 68
May 30, 2016
Aren't there non-Flemish Belgians? (Sorry; I'm American and do not know these things automagically.)
+1
level 73
May 21, 2017
There are.
+1
level 67
Nov 4, 2016
That would defeat the point of asking about the people who live in the specific region, now wouldn't it?
+1
level 57
May 16, 2016
For Los Angeles, it didn't accept: an "incredibly stuck-up, narcissistic, materialistic, soulless bitch." I'm from San Francisco. I feel strongly.
+1
level 67
Nov 4, 2016
Los Angeles is not located in Marin County. Try again.
+1
level 70
Nov 6, 2016
I tried that one for the Paris question. No luck either.
+2
level 25
May 26, 2016
i put neighborino for flanders...
+1
level 32
Nov 4, 2016
funniest thing i've heard all day.
+1
level 47
May 27, 2016
Will "hick" work for Texas? KIDDING!!! Goodnight, try the veal!
+1
level 60
Nov 4, 2016
iunderstoodthatreference.gif
+1
level 68
May 30, 2016
If you ever want to add more wacky ones (like Haligonian), don't forget that people from Cambridge are Cantabrigians!
+1
level 54
Jun 22, 2016
Why would you not accept "youper"? I'm from Michigan and I thought I knew how to spell it. That being said a lot of these are pretty absurd.
+2
level 60
Sep 4, 2016
Cypriot is one of my favourite words. It's remarkably fun to say.
+1
level 58
Sep 6, 2016
Just Scouse should be accepted... never heard anyone called a "scouser" but I have heard people from Liverpool describe themselves as a just plain "scouse"
+1
level 72
Nov 4, 2016
Absolutely +1.
+1
level 57
Nov 4, 2016
Completely wrong. They are Scouse but the adjective is "Scouser."
+1
level 48
Nov 4, 2016
Scouser is the noun used for people, scouse might get used as an adjective or as the accent - or as some weird kind of food (and I'm from Liverpool).
+1
level 40
Nov 4, 2016
I've never heard someone from Poland being called a Pole. I've only heard them being called a Polock/Polack.
+2
level 65
Nov 4, 2016
Then apparently your education derives entirely from jokes.
+1
level 56
Nov 4, 2016
I've always seen it as Bromley for those from Birmingham.
+2
level 57
Nov 4, 2016
Bromley is an entirely different place.
+1
level 22
Nov 4, 2016
ive lived in southern california my whole life and never have i heard "angeleno"
+1
level 67
Nov 4, 2016
It was in at least four political TV ads yesterday on Fox 11.
+1
level 66
Nov 4, 2016
Darn, stopped at Scouse and forgot the R
+1
level 47
Nov 4, 2016
Could napolitan be accepted?
+1
level 56
Jun 7, 2017
No, because it's not right.
+1
level 26
Nov 4, 2016
You should accept canook or canoock as spelling
+2
level 48
Nov 4, 2016
I vote against. Please accept the correct spelling.
+1
level 73
May 21, 2017
What are you on aboot?
+1
level 40
Nov 4, 2016
Interesting. Can the answer for liverpool-slang please be accepted without an r on the end? Although I know this quiz is quite old.
+1
level 48
Nov 4, 2016
No - because that's the accent, not the people. Liverpudlians are scousers.
+1
level 65
Oct 5, 2017
I tend to disagree. The first time I heard this usage I was in Ireland on holiday when an Irishman said "So your a scouse", I had not heard the expression before, I was 6 years old, and I took umbrage at being called something that I didn't know what it was. I was from Blackpool a whole 30 miles away from Liverpool. In my many years since I have heard 'Scouse' used this way more times than I've had hot dinners........ and I've had a few.
+1
level 67
Nov 4, 2016
Pro tip: never go to anywhere south of the United States and say you're an "American". There's a reason why the Spanish demonym is "estadounidense".
+1
level 73
Nov 4, 2016
This is absolutely horrible advice. I'm sitting in my 50th country today. I get asked a lot where I am from. If I want to get confused looks I will tell people I am from the States, the United States, the US, the USA, or Virginia.
If I want an instant look of recognition, then I will say I am American or from America.

Finally, Spanish for American is Americano. Estadounidense is a synonym. Type the latter into Google translate and guess what the translation is.
+1
level 60
Nov 4, 2016
To be fair dasubergeek probably forgot that there's quite a lot of world that could be descriibed as "south of the United States", but s/he meant Latin America. Actual Spaniards (ha!) would probably not instantly recognise estadounidense either.
+2
level 40
Nov 4, 2016
^^that's a little culturally chauvinistic of you isn't it kalba? just because the US has dominated the world to the extent where 'American' has become the standard demonym for someone from the US doesn't make it correct. Imagine if people just started referring to Chinese people as Asians and everybody else became something different. It'd be a little absurd wouldn't it? Asian refers to anyone from the Asian continent, just as American should refer to anyone from the Americas. Like dasubergeek says, there are lots of people in Latin America who will call you out if you use the word 'americano' to refer exclusively to the United States, as they are also from the Americas. As an aside, I don't think Google Translate (a US-based company might I add) is a credible source for establishing synonyms in a foreign language.
+2
level ∞
Nov 4, 2016
100% true @kalbahamut. When I first started traveling abroad I was trying to be super polite so I always said "I'm from the United States". It didn't go over that great so I switched to "I'm American" and never looked back. I haven't travelled a lot in Latin America though, so that may be a special case.
+2
level ∞
Nov 4, 2016
And of course, Mexico is technically "Estados Unidos Mexicanos". So let's be honest, moaning about a person from the U.S. calling themselves American is a little silly.
+1
level 73
Nov 5, 2016
powdamonkey, with due respect, that's ridiculous. It's not in any way chauvinistic of me to state that in at least 49 non-American countries, people refer to Americans as Americans and are confused if you try to be "correct." It's not that Americans insist on one way and the rest of the world disagrees with them; it's that the entire world understands this word to mean one thing and then a few belligerent goobers insist on finding a reason to be offended. You don't want to use a word correctly, you want to change the meaning of a word to your own chauvinistic ends.
+2
level 40
Nov 6, 2016
Sorry kalba, I was probably a little rude in my previous post. No intention for offence to be taken, I'm only up for a bit of friendly discussion. That said, I wouldn't say my ends are chauvinistic. They may not currently be the most common form in usage but they're certainly geographically correct. The way I see it, of course a great portion of the world sees people from the US as Americans, but language is constantly changing and there are a lot of Latin Americans (who I've met in Colombia, Nicaragua and Guatemala, amongst other places) who will refuse to call someone from the US an American, because they see it as a relic of US imperial domination that they can simply claim and use the demonym for two entire continents. So whilst yes, American is the term in most common usage, I certainly don't think it's fair to say that only a bunch of belligerent goobers (I actually laughed when I read this, might have to steal it!) want to have a conversation about change.
+1
level 73
Nov 13, 2016
powda, I wasn't offended. I just disagreed with what you said. Yes language is living in dynamic. And I, like QuizMaster, have never actually visited South America before though I've been all over the rest of the world. Given that language is dynamic and about common usage, I maintain it's *more* accurate to call Americans Americans as this is the common usage of the word and has been for hundreds of years. If some disgruntled Colombians want to object to that, that's fine, but let's understand that this has nothing to do with being "correct" and everything to do with politics. The people trying to subvert the language to their own self-serving (chauvinistic) ends are those trying to change the meaning of the word, not those who are just going along with centuries of common usage. It's like the Saudis who now refuse to call the Persian Gulf the Persian Gulf. Even on old *Arab* maps, it is labeled as such. But now they insist on "Arabian Gulf" because of politics.
+1
level 50
Nov 4, 2016
Go Skyrim for helping me with the Breton answer!
+1
level 46
Nov 5, 2016
more people knew Liverpudlian than Scouser? surprising to me
+1
level 50
Nov 5, 2016
I did a quiz with all the nationalities of the world, you can check it at my profile.
+1
level 22
Jan 24, 2017
Yuper, youper, yupper...... YOOPER??? Ugh....
+1
level 39
Mar 28, 2017
It is my considered opinion that the United States and Canada are unique. It would be too confusing to start saying New Yorkers, Alabamians, Arkansians, New Mexicans, Arizonans, Prince Edward Islanders, etc., etc., to identify citizens of these two countries. My point is that in almost all of the rest of the world, people are more likely to identify by their nationality/country: Dutchman, German, Peruvian, Chilean, Cape Verdean, Moroccan, Iranian, Iraqi, Swiss, Belgian etc, etc.,
+1
level 73
May 21, 2017
Maybe you just haven't spent enough time in those places to be familiar with the regions and the demonyms associated with them. I saw so many housing ads in Khobar, Saudi Arabia, posted by Indians who insisted on certain people (Keralites only!!), here in Visayas (the Philippines) people are definitely proud of being Cebuano and don't even speak the same language as those from Manila, the Belgian I met in Denmark identified himself first as Flemish, my 3rd year Spanish teacher at University identified himself as Basque, all the Saudis I ever met in the six years I spent there were *very* cognizant of different territorial claims by various tribes within the kingdom.. Wadi Ad-Dawasir is the domain of the Dossarys, Rashidis reign supreme in Ha'il, Sharifs hold sway in Mecca, and the AlSauds power base is of course Riyadh and Diriyah, etc. People would identify as being from Nejd, or the Hejaz, or from Shiite Qatif all the time.
Maybe your considered opinion wasn't well considered.
+1
level 26
Apr 23, 2017
Yoopers for the win!
+1
level 39
Apr 27, 2017
I have lived in South America and the most identifiable name I've heard for people from the United States of America is "Yanqui", usually followed by non-too-flattering adjectives.
+1
level 73
May 21, 2017
Yankee was a common pejorative for Americans favored by the British around the time of the Revolutionary War... it was reclaimed by Americans who used the term in self-descriptions proudly.
+1
level 39
Oct 5, 2017
Yes, it was reclaimed by Americans: Latin Americans! - Now go ahead and delete this comment.
+1
level 73
Jun 3, 2018
I can't delete your comment but I will say that it makes no sense at all.
+1
level 44
Jun 15, 2017
apparently Genoese =\= Salami
+1
level 3
Jun 20, 2017
Wow what about the REST of the world?!like that quiz was mainly America,Europe .Africans???
+2
level 28
Jul 20, 2017
Canadians don't say canuck; I don't, no one I know does. It's something Americans like to think is cute, but it's just annoying.
+1
level 65
Oct 5, 2017
I have heard the use of 'Canuck' as a derogatory term here in Australia. In fact in the Northern Territory I witnessed a fight between a Canadian guy and a Queenslander over the snarled usage of the term.
+1
level 50
Oct 5, 2017
Who won?
+1
level 43
Oct 5, 2017
Does that mean you're not familiar with that hockey team from Vancouver, BC?
+2
level 65
Aug 19, 2017
I thought Filipinos were called Pinoy. Or is that slang?
+1
level 73
Jun 3, 2018
Slang with positive connotations. If they see a beautiful Filipino woman they might refer to her as "Pinay."
+1
level 39
Aug 19, 2017
Got quite a lot but disappointed that it took me so long to get trojan.
+1
level 58
Jan 19, 2018
Someone who is Flemish is a Fleming. Phoenicians came from Phoenicia (unless you are referring to the town in Arizona?)
+1
level 40
Apr 13, 2018
The Arizonian(?) city is being referred to, yes.
+1
level 44
Jan 30, 2018
well can't believe I remembered Hoosier and Genoese
+1
level 47
Feb 16, 2018
You should add "Aussie" for Australians
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