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Demonyms Quiz

What do you call people from these places?
Last updated: August 28, 2018
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a person from
is called ...
the United States
an American
the Netherlands
Dutch
Venice
a Venetian
Texas
a Texan
Philippines
a Filipino
Canada
a Canadian
Canada (slang)
a Canuck
Flanders
Flemish
Peru
a Peruvian
Indiana
a Hoosier
Paris
a Parisian
a person from
is called ...
Rome
a Roman
Moscow
a Muscovite
Troy
a Trojan
Iraq
an Iraqi
Spain
a Spaniard
Switzerland
Swiss
Berlin
a Berliner
Denmark
a Dane
Genoa
Genoese
Brittany
a Breton
Poland
a Pole
a person from
is called ...
London
a Londoner
New Zealand (slang)
a Kiwi
Liverpool
a Liverpudlian
Liverpool (slang)
a Scouser
Birmingham (slang)
a Brummie
Wales
Welsh
Los Angeles
an Angeleno
Cyprus
a Cypriot
Phoenix
a Phoenician
Naples
a Neapolitan
Michigan's UP
a Yooper
+2
level 32
Jul 11, 2011
Can't believe I missed Dutch and Swiss...what was I thinking?
+3
level 7
Jul 12, 2011
you don’t call a person from the netherlands a ‘dutch’ they speak dutch, but i speak english and i am an american not a ‘english’ they don’t really have anything they are called.
+10
level 75
Apr 24, 2014
You could call a person from the Netherlands a Dutchman.
+4
level 77
Apr 24, 2014
or a Dutchwoman ^^.
+3
level 48
Jun 18, 2014
An airborne Dutchman?
+10
level 67
Jul 7, 2014
He would be the Flying Dutchman.
+2
level 75
May 7, 2016
And if he was a frycook?
+7
level 69
Mar 13, 2018
the Frying Dutchman!
+4
level 53
Apr 14, 2018
My 1st guess was Nederlander.
+3
level 38
May 29, 2018
Before political correctness set in, they were called "Dutchmen." - If there is no current designation, I guess it's because the politically correct police can't come up with an acceptable one. (Dutch man/ woman would engender the argument, "a dutch girl isn't a woman"). "Nederlander" is gender-neutral and, therefore, correct but is seldom used.
+4
level 51
Feb 18, 2019
Gender neutrality is not the dilemmatic inconvenience that people who are fed up with "political correctness" perceive and make it out to be. We're intelligent enough to send people to space but not to avoid gendering everything? There's a very simple way to refer to a person from the netherlands in english and that's "dutch person"
+1
level 30
Feb 18, 2019
These things have nothing to do with policing and everything with respect and consideration for others. Well, in fact that's what policing is about too for the most part, come to think of it.
+3
level ∞
Feb 18, 2019
To some extent, political correctness is about being polite. But the complicated rules for PC terms are also used to exert power over cultural outgroups. It's very difficult to keep up with the currently acceptable terms. People are ostracized and shamed for using "incorrect" terminology, even if it wasn't intended in a negative way.
+1
level 55
Jul 29, 2011
@bingoseventeen... They are called the Dutch... or Dutch people... just like people from Switzerland speak Swiss and are known as the Swiss or Swiss people... The French speak French... The Japanese speak Japanese... (Some of) The Irish speak Irish... I wonder what you would call the Dutch? A Netherlander? A Hollandaise perhaps??
+1
level 72
Feb 8, 2013
Well, it's Swiss German and Swiss Italian and Swiss French. Also, in case you ever see this, Slim316, your sauce joke was not los ton me.
+1
level 48
Apr 24, 2014
Actually, there is a Swiss French and a Swiss Italian. Although Swiss French is almost extinct and Swiss Italian is rarely used outside of family and friends. And the Swiss German isn't that different from each other.
+2
level 45
Sep 3, 2014
Hollandaise... You're killing me!
+1
level 65
Apr 7, 2016
For some reason I'm hungry now
+2
level 44
Mar 31, 2018
That logic doesnt always work... Indians dont speak "Indian" lol
+3
level 36
May 15, 2018
SOMEONE FINALLY KNOWS
+1
level 52
Oct 10, 2018
that's a bit saucy....
+1
level 34
Feb 18, 2019
Swissmen or Swisswomen speak Swiss? hahhahhahaha no, they speak German, Italian, or French
+1
level 18
Aug 4, 2011
An inhabitant of the Netherlands is called a Dutchman or a Dutchwoman. An inhabitant of Flanders is called a Fleming or a Belgian ;). Just look it up if you don't take my word for it :P.
+2
level 77
Apr 24, 2014
Belgian must not be accepted. Fleming is the appropriate answer (they say "vlaming" in dutch).
+1
level 68
Apr 22, 2018
What about the French half of Belgium - what do they call themselves?
+1
level 64
Jun 24, 2018
Walloons
+1
level 38
Aug 17, 2018
They say "Vlaamse" or "Vlaanderen" in Dutch.
+1
level 38
Aug 17, 2018
Someone from Flanders is referred to as Flemish, not Fleming.
+1
level 62
Feb 18, 2019
Someone from Flanders is a Fleming. Flemish is the adjective.
+1
level 33
Aug 26, 2011
If it wasn't the obvious I missed, it was the weirdness that couldn't be gotten. Liverpudlian--really? Who knows this stuff but ultimate nerds?
+8
level 23
Aug 10, 2013
Nearly everyone in Britain knows a liverpudlian when they see one
+1
level 34
Apr 24, 2014
if someone is speaking, what you believe to be english and have no idea what they are saying they are from liverpool
+1
level 44
Aug 7, 2014
So true!
+1
level 64
Jun 24, 2018
A lot of Liverpudlians in the southern USA.
+1
level 28
Feb 18, 2019
Or they're Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Yorkshire or pretty much anywhere except London
+2
level 75
May 7, 2016
Sounds like some strange type of person encountered by Gulliver in his travels.
+3
level 27
Sep 15, 2011
Ithabise - Every Beatles fan knows that they're called Liverpudlians! :-)
+1
level 44
Nov 7, 2011
We have a Newcastle in Australia as well, and those dudes are called Novocastrians, though I'm not entirely certain that's the correct spelling
+1
level 67
Nov 24, 2014
Someone from Newcastle England are called geordies' (why'I man)
+1
level 20
May 11, 2012
Only got flemish 'cause my aunt's family is from Flanders
+1
level 1
Jun 1, 2012
ha i missed AMERICAN XD
+1
level 40
Jan 5, 2013
28/33. not bad
+2
level 75
Jan 15, 2013
Isn't "Genovese" the adjective and "Genoan" is the noun? I tried "Liverpooligan" because I had no idea what the real answer was. I think I like Liverpooligan better than Scouser.
+1
level 53
Apr 1, 2013
Essentially, these are Demonyms, both recognized & unofficial
+1
level 13
Jun 24, 2013
Didn't know any of the American ones.
+4
level 67
Sep 25, 2013
It would be cool if someone from Naples was a "Napoleon".
+1
level 76
Jun 18, 2015
I genuinely put that by accident because my brain was all stuffy.
+1
level 67
Feb 21, 2016
Stay off the brandy Buck.
+1
level 64
Jun 24, 2018
Napoleon brandy?
+1
level 55
Jan 12, 2014
Could I have "Troian" added as an alternative for "Trojan"?
+1
level 53
Apr 20, 2014
The adjective for Genoa is Genoese, not Genovese. I think you're confusing it with Genevese, the adjective for Geneva.
+1
level ∞
Apr 21, 2014
Fixed!
+2
level 68
Apr 24, 2014
Or Vito, the old Mafia Don.
+1
level 71
Apr 24, 2014
Got "Breton" thanks to remembering what the name was in French - Bretagne and Bretons. Stroke of luck that it was the same.
+1
level 41
Nov 4, 2016
I grew up there but somehow I read that as Great Britain and didn't even get it right :(
+2
level 79
Apr 24, 2014
Two small points: A Filipino refers to a male from the Philippines; a woman is called a Filipina. Second, I always thought people from Paris were called Parisites.
+4
level 75
Apr 24, 2014
Filipino can be men or women. Filipinas are just women. Standard gender bias in the Spanish language.
+2
level 77
Apr 24, 2014
It is Parisian. Anything else would be stupid since we all say "parisien" in French...
+4
level 67
Aug 16, 2015
Collect the bag marked (Sense of Humour) on your way out.
+1
level 49
Nov 4, 2016
hahaha +2 Mal
+1
level 67
Nov 4, 2016
So not "Parigot" then?
+2
level 69
Apr 24, 2014
i think pinoy should be accepted
+1
level 50
Jul 20, 2014
You do realize what Parisites sounds like, right?
+5
level 59
Nov 4, 2016
I think that was the joke.
+2
level 35
Apr 25, 2014
YOu should accept Philippino for Philippines
+1
level 26
Jan 5, 2018
how about pinoy?
+1
level 73
Apr 25, 2014
So not Jelly Doughnut?
+4
level 49
Nov 4, 2016
Ich bin eine Jelly Doughnut!
+3
level 56
Jun 7, 2017
Urban myth
+2
level 59
Aug 6, 2014
What a great quiz! As a British person I knew the funny little British city ones, as a half Italian I knew Genovese (and thanks for accepting that) and as a lifelong student of the USA I got the rest. (I did have to look up the Michigan UP answer, but having already read about that place I did know it was something like Yoo-Pee-er..
+1
level 44
Feb 18, 2019
I know certain people in the US love to say 'British' as shorthand for anything/anyone from anywhere in Great Britain or the UK, but these are all English cities so 'British city' sounds a bit odd.
+1
level 44
Aug 7, 2014
If you go to Purdue, Notre Dame or Butler you're not still a Hoosier, are you?
+1
level 66
Sep 21, 2014
aren't people from Spain called Spanish?? In Spanish we have the same word! (Español)
+3
level 49
Nov 4, 2016
The clue includes "a" before the answer. If you are 'Spanish' you are 'a Spaniard'.
+2
level 49
Nov 4, 2016
A Spanish guy or a Spaniard, a Polish guy or a Pole, a Danish guy or a Dane, a British guy or a Brit.
+3
level 59
Jun 5, 2017
Supertramp - it's really Briton - Brit is shorthand.
+1
level 70
Oct 20, 2014
I kind of knew it was a yooper, but couldn't get the spelling right, kept trying combinations with a U. No clue for those English nicknames.
+1
level 65
Nov 4, 2016
Yeah more spellings would be appreciated. I tried Yoper, Yuper, Yewper, Yupper, Eweper, Youper, Uper...
+1
level 14
Nov 23, 2014
Only got Trojan cause i red a story about troy recently
+1
level 59
Nov 4, 2016
Was it about the Trojan horse, by any chance?
+1
level 26
Feb 20, 2018
Trojan isn't a good name for someone from troy because it means the same as a computer virus.
+5
level 42
Apr 13, 2018
You do realize that the virus name comes from the city, right? It's called a Trojan virus because of the Trojan Horse story.
+1
level 38
Feb 18, 2019
OHHHH!!! I always figured the actual Trojan Horse was named after the computer virus...
+1
level 19
Dec 6, 2014
You had yooper for UP why not troll for LP? lol
+1
level 19
Dec 6, 2014
under the bridge (mackinaw) a troll lives under the bridge.
+1
level 21
Jan 16, 2015
anybody else got every one right? cause i did...not bragging or anything. Just saying! :)
+1
level 45
May 31, 2015
I did.
+1
level 16
Feb 1, 2015
O live in MI, but I've never heard the term "yooper"
+1
level 36
Mar 7, 2015
Can you accept spouse for liverpool(slang)
+1
level 45
May 31, 2015
Lol!!
+2
level 25
Mar 12, 2015
Scouse is a stew type dish, originally 'Labskause' brought to liverpool by sailors, renamed Lobscouse and subsequently shortened to Scouse. Scouser was originally the name given to people who ate the dish which later expanded to all Liverpudlians. I've also heard it called Lobby as well, but the may just be a regional variation
+1
level 55
Apr 10, 2015
Is it bad that I live in Michigan and have never heard anyone referred to as a Yooper?
+1
level 59
Aug 7, 2016
Well, I'd never heard of Yooper. But then, I live in New Zealand.
+1
level 65
Nov 4, 2016
Yeah, it's kind of bad.
+1
level 55
Aug 25, 2015
Can I have 'Moscovite' and/or 'Moscovian' for 'Muscovite'?
+1
level 67
Feb 28, 2016
Can you add 'Belgian' for Flanders?
+2
level 70
May 30, 2016
Aren't there non-Flemish Belgians? (Sorry; I'm American and do not know these things automagically.)
+1
level 75
May 21, 2017
There are.
+1
level 75
Feb 18, 2019
Also, was "automagically" a typo?
+2
level 65
Nov 4, 2016
That would defeat the point of asking about the people who live in the specific region, now wouldn't it?
+2
level 60
May 16, 2016
For Los Angeles, it didn't accept: an "incredibly stuck-up, narcissistic, materialistic, soulless bitch." I'm from San Francisco. I feel strongly.
+1
level 67
Nov 4, 2016
Los Angeles is not located in Marin County. Try again.
+1
level 71
Nov 6, 2016
I tried that one for the Paris question. No luck either.
+2
level 47
May 27, 2016
Will "hick" work for Texas? KIDDING!!! Goodnight, try the veal!
+1
level 59
Nov 4, 2016
iunderstoodthatreference.gif
+1
level 70
May 30, 2016
If you ever want to add more wacky ones (like Haligonian), don't forget that people from Cambridge are Cantabrigians!
+2
level 57
Sep 6, 2016
Just Scouse should be accepted... never heard anyone called a "scouser" but I have heard people from Liverpool describe themselves as a just plain "scouse"
+1
level 74
Nov 4, 2016
Absolutely +1.
+1
level 58
Nov 4, 2016
Completely wrong. They are Scouse but the adjective is "Scouser."
+1
level 49
Nov 4, 2016
Scouser is the noun used for people, scouse might get used as an adjective or as the accent - or as some weird kind of food (and I'm from Liverpool).
+1
level 40
Nov 4, 2016
I've never heard someone from Poland being called a Pole. I've only heard them being called a Polock/Polack.
+5
level 65
Nov 4, 2016
Then apparently your education derives entirely from jokes.
+1
level 57
Nov 4, 2016
I've always seen it as Bromley for those from Birmingham.
+3
level 58
Nov 4, 2016
Bromley is an entirely different place.
+1
level 32
Nov 4, 2016
ive lived in southern california my whole life and never have i heard "angeleno"
+1
level 67
Nov 4, 2016
It was in at least four political TV ads yesterday on Fox 11.
+1
level 66
Nov 4, 2016
Darn, stopped at Scouse and forgot the R
+1
level 47
Nov 4, 2016
Could napolitan be accepted?
+1
level 56
Jun 7, 2017
No, because it's not right.
+1
level 27
Nov 4, 2016
You should accept canook or canoock as spelling
+2
level 49
Nov 4, 2016
I vote against. Please accept the correct spelling.
+1
level 75
May 21, 2017
What are you on aboot?
+2
level 43
Nov 4, 2016
Interesting. Can the answer for liverpool-slang please be accepted without an r on the end? Although I know this quiz is quite old.
+1
level 49
Nov 4, 2016
No - because that's the accent, not the people. Liverpudlians are scousers.
+1
level 67
Oct 5, 2017
I tend to disagree. The first time I heard this usage I was in Ireland on holiday when an Irishman said "So your a scouse", I had not heard the expression before, I was 6 years old, and I took umbrage at being called something that I didn't know what it was. I was from Blackpool a whole 30 miles away from Liverpool. In my many years since I have heard 'Scouse' used this way more times than I've had hot dinners........ and I've had a few.
+1
level 67
Nov 4, 2016
Pro tip: never go to anywhere south of the United States and say you're an "American". There's a reason why the Spanish demonym is "estadounidense".
+1
level 75
Nov 4, 2016
This is absolutely horrible advice. I'm sitting in my 50th country today. I get asked a lot where I am from. If I want to get confused looks I will tell people I am from the States, the United States, the US, the USA, or Virginia.
If I want an instant look of recognition, then I will say I am American or from America.

Finally, Spanish for American is Americano. Estadounidense is a synonym. Type the latter into Google translate and guess what the translation is.
+1
level 59
Nov 4, 2016
To be fair dasubergeek probably forgot that there's quite a lot of world that could be descriibed as "south of the United States", but s/he meant Latin America. Actual Spaniards (ha!) would probably not instantly recognise estadounidense either.
+5
level 40
Nov 4, 2016
^^that's a little culturally chauvinistic of you isn't it kalba? just because the US has dominated the world to the extent where 'American' has become the standard demonym for someone from the US doesn't make it correct. Imagine if people just started referring to Chinese people as Asians and everybody else became something different. It'd be a little absurd wouldn't it? Asian refers to anyone from the Asian continent, just as American should refer to anyone from the Americas. Like dasubergeek says, there are lots of people in Latin America who will call you out if you use the word 'americano' to refer exclusively to the United States, as they are also from the Americas. As an aside, I don't think Google Translate (a US-based company might I add) is a credible source for establishing synonyms in a foreign language.
+3
level ∞
Nov 4, 2016
100% true @kalbahamut. When I first started traveling abroad I was trying to be super polite so I always said "I'm from the United States". It didn't go over that great so I switched to "I'm American" and never looked back. I haven't travelled a lot in Latin America though, so that may be a special case.
+3
level ∞
Nov 4, 2016
And of course, Mexico is technically "Estados Unidos Mexicanos". So let's be honest, moaning about a person from the U.S. calling themselves American is a little silly.
+1
level 75
Nov 5, 2016
powdamonkey, with due respect, that's ridiculous. It's not in any way chauvinistic of me to state that in at least 49 non-American countries, people refer to Americans as Americans and are confused if you try to be "correct." It's not that Americans insist on one way and the rest of the world disagrees with them; it's that the entire world understands this word to mean one thing and then a few belligerent goobers insist on finding a reason to be offended. You don't want to use a word correctly, you want to change the meaning of a word to your own chauvinistic ends.
+4
level 40
Nov 6, 2016
Sorry kalba, I was probably a little rude in my previous post. No intention for offence to be taken, I'm only up for a bit of friendly discussion. That said, I wouldn't say my ends are chauvinistic. They may not currently be the most common form in usage but they're certainly geographically correct. The way I see it, of course a great portion of the world sees people from the US as Americans, but language is constantly changing and there are a lot of Latin Americans (who I've met in Colombia, Nicaragua and Guatemala, amongst other places) who will refuse to call someone from the US an American, because they see it as a relic of US imperial domination that they can simply claim and use the demonym for two entire continents. So whilst yes, American is the term in most common usage, I certainly don't think it's fair to say that only a bunch of belligerent goobers (I actually laughed when I read this, might have to steal it!) want to have a conversation about change.
+1
level 75
Nov 13, 2016
powda, I wasn't offended. I just disagreed with what you said. Yes language is living in dynamic. And I, like QuizMaster, have never actually visited South America before though I've been all over the rest of the world. Given that language is dynamic and about common usage, I maintain it's *more* accurate to call Americans Americans as this is the common usage of the word and has been for hundreds of years. If some disgruntled Colombians want to object to that, that's fine, but let's understand that this has nothing to do with being "correct" and everything to do with politics. The people trying to subvert the language to their own self-serving (chauvinistic) ends are those trying to change the meaning of the word, not those who are just going along with centuries of common usage. It's like the Saudis who now refuse to call the Persian Gulf the Persian Gulf. Even on old *Arab* maps, it is labeled as such. But now they insist on "Arabian Gulf" because of politics.
+1
level 67
Feb 19, 2019
I know I'm a bit late to the party, but I can confirm that, generally, in Latin America, people dislike Americans calling themselves "Americano", mostly for hitorical/political reasons. They will most likely understand what you mean, but you will be perceived as an obnoxious individual. So, if you ever find yourself in Latin America, try to use "estadounidense" (or "gringo" if you have a sense of humour about yourself)
+1
level 53
Nov 4, 2016
Go Skyrim for helping me with the Breton answer!
+1
level 45
Nov 5, 2016
more people knew Liverpudlian than Scouser? surprising to me
+1
level 48
Nov 5, 2016
I did a quiz with all the nationalities of the world, you can check it at my profile.
+1
level 38
Apr 27, 2017
I have lived in South America and the most identifiable name I've heard for people from the United States of America is "Yanqui", usually followed by non-too-flattering adjectives.
+1
level 75
May 21, 2017
Yankee was a common pejorative for Americans favored by the British around the time of the Revolutionary War... it was reclaimed by Americans who used the term in self-descriptions proudly.
+2
level 38
Oct 5, 2017
Yes, it was reclaimed by Americans: Latin Americans! - Now go ahead and delete this comment.
+3
level 75
Jun 3, 2018
I can't delete your comment but I will say that it makes no sense at all.
+1
level 75
Feb 19, 2019
I often hear it as Yank, too. Doesn't bother me either way.
+1
level 55
Feb 18, 2019
That term is still used today, it's not an antiquated expression.
+1
level 44
Jun 15, 2017
apparently Genoese =\= Salami
+3
level 28
Jul 20, 2017
Canadians don't say canuck; I don't, no one I know does. It's something Americans like to think is cute, but it's just annoying.
+1
level 67
Oct 5, 2017
I have heard the use of 'Canuck' as a derogatory term here in Australia. In fact in the Northern Territory I witnessed a fight between a Canadian guy and a Queenslander over the snarled usage of the term.
+2
level 49
Oct 5, 2017
Who won?
+2
level 49
Oct 5, 2017
Does that mean you're not familiar with that hockey team from Vancouver, BC?
+2
level 67
Aug 19, 2017
I thought Filipinos were called Pinoy. Or is that slang?
+1
level 75
Jun 3, 2018
Slang with positive connotations. If they see a beautiful Filipino woman they might refer to her as "Pinay."
+1
level 39
Aug 19, 2017
Got quite a lot but disappointed that it took me so long to get trojan.
+1
level 62
Jan 19, 2018
Someone who is Flemish is a Fleming. Phoenicians came from Phoenicia (unless you are referring to the town in Arizona?)
+1
level 42
Apr 13, 2018
The Arizonian(?) city is being referred to, yes.
+1
level 71
Sep 8, 2018
Have you seriously called Phoenix (1.5 m) a TOWN?
+1
level 47
Jan 30, 2018
well can't believe I remembered Hoosier and Genoese
+2
level 49
Feb 16, 2018
You should add "Aussie" for Australians
+4
level 45
Jan 29, 2019
Stupid Flanders
+1
level 66
Feb 18, 2019
I, for one, tried Flanderseses.
+1
level 44
Feb 18, 2019
Most of the ones I missed were the American ones, so it was interesting to learn what people from those places were called. Phoenicians for Phoenix. I would never have guessed.
+1
level 44
Feb 18, 2019
I'd be happy never to be called a Brit by anyone ever again so glad that wasn't a question.
+1
level 30
Feb 18, 2019
Excellent quiz! More, please ! I think this type of quiz would be a great addition to any geography badge, btw.
+1
level 21
Feb 18, 2019
I missed Canadian *facepalm*
+1
level 71
Feb 18, 2019
It would make me happy if people from Flanders were called philanderers
+1
level 53
Feb 18, 2019
Should make an "Escanaba in da Moonlight" quiz
+1
level 55
Feb 18, 2019
Maybe accept slight misspellings of "Venetian" in which an "i" is used for the 4th letter instead of an "e"? I was super confused why my (misspelled) answer wasn't being accepted and couldn't figure out where the misspelling was (particularly since the letter "i" is pronounced with an "eeee" sound in Italian).
+1
level 34
Feb 18, 2019
United States citizens call themselves Americans, but Americans are all that live in America which is a CONTINENT. They should be called US citizens. In Spanish we have a word that makes it all easier "estadounidenses" it is also harder than "americanos" but it is correct.
+1
level 40
Feb 19, 2019
I wrote down "normal". They didn't accept it.
+1
level 54
Feb 18, 2019
28/33. I stunned by how poorly most folks seemed to go with this quiz
+1
level 75
Feb 19, 2019
Knew Liverpudlian but in all the spelling variations I tried I always stuck in an extra d. Still doesn't look right with only one. I was probably thinking of Lilliputian and mixing the two.
+1
level 71
Feb 20, 2019
When you update, you should add Porteño for Buenos Aires.
+1
level 32
Feb 22, 2019
Somehow it is illogical to call only people from USA American, since USA is just a part of Americas, geographically. In principle for example people from Canada, Mexico, Chile or Brazil are also American. And then, I was once told by a Filipina that if I (a Finn) went to Philippines, they would most certainly call me there "Americano".
+1
level 75
Feb 24, 2019
It's not illogical at all it is common, broadly understood convention. Do you feel it is illogical to call people from the United States of Mexico "Mexican?" How about referring to people from the US state of Georgia as "Georgian?" This is just stupid. Besides, things from North America are North American, things from South America are South American, things from either can be unambiguously described as "from the Americas," but American for centuries has been commonly understood to mean from the USA. It's about conveying meaning in a way that you will be understood and there's nothing wrong or illogical about it.
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