Sue Grafton's Alphabet Series

Sue Grafton was a mystery writer whose many novels followed the letters of the alphabet. Try to guess the names of her books with these helpful hints.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: December 8, 2020
First submittedDecember 7, 2020
Times taken4,671
Rating4.17
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Year
Hint
Book
1982
Proof that a person was not present when the crime as committed
A is for Alibi
1985
Person who breaks into a building, especially at night
B is for Burglar
1986
A dead body
C is for Corpse
1987
Person who evades child support payments
D is for Deadbeat
1988
Data used to convict or exonerate a suspect
E is for Evidence
1989
One who is on the run from the law
F is for Fugitive
1990
Slang for "detective"
G is for Gumshoe
1991
Another word for murder
H is for Homicide
1992
The opposite of guilty
I is for Innocent
1993
A ruling by the court
J is for Judgment
1994
One who commits murder
K is for Killer
1995
Describes a place where the law does not apply
L is for Lawless
1996
An intention to do ill will, usually necessary for a charge of 1st degree murder
M is for Malice
1998
Hangman's rope
N is for Noose
1999
One who is not afforded the protection of the law
O is for Outlaw
2001
A state of imminent danger
P is for Peril
2002
Something being hunted; or, a place where rocks are mined
Q is for Quarry
2004
A bullet's bounce
R is for Ricochet
2005
The lack of sound
S is for Silence
2007
To unlawfully enter a property
T is for Trespass
2009
A deadly current that sucks one away from the shore
U is for Undertow
2011
Retribution
V is for Vengeance
2013
Mobster slang for "iced, whacked, killed". It also means "drunk".
W is for Wasted
2015
 
X
2017
A day we'll never get back
Y is for Yesterday
+3
Level 71
Dec 8, 2020
The last novel would have been called Z is for Zero. So close to finishing the series..
+3
Level 67
Dec 8, 2020
Zombie
+3
Level 82
Dec 11, 2020
It could be ghost written.
+3
Level 50
Dec 8, 2020
She died before she could make Z :(
+2
Level 66
Dec 8, 2020
She died before the last one :(
+3
Level 57
Dec 8, 2020
"A day we'll never get back" hit me deeper than it should've
+3
Level 57
Dec 8, 2020
I did enjoy this series, and was very sad that the author never lived to write her last 'letter'. Thank you for the quiz, and bringing back some good memories
+1
Level 49
Dec 18, 2020
cool quiz
+2
Level 65
Jan 8, 2021
Pretty impressive to have both the confidence and perseverance to start this thing in 1982 and stick with it for 35 years. Can't just stop after D, can you?
+1
Level 55
Jan 8, 2021
how come x has a year even though there’s no novel or answer?
+3
Level 70
Jan 8, 2021
There is a novel. The whole title is "X". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X_(novel)
+4
Level 66
Jan 8, 2021
Small error: murder is not the same thing as homicide. Murder implies a premeditated killing of another (i.e. ex ante intent), whilst homicide is just the killing of another. All murders are homicides but not all homicides are murders (e.g. self-defence killing would be homicide, not murder).
+1
Level 43
Jan 8, 2021
C'mon, X is for Xylophone (used to brutally bash someone on the head) would've been good.
+1
Level 64
Jan 8, 2021
Or "X" is for "Xenophile." Or "Xerox." Or "Xenon." Or some other random word that has nothing to do with crime.
+1
Level 58
Jan 8, 2021
Xenophobia could be a cause for a crime. I guess Xavier or Xerxes could be a character as well.
+1
Level 78
Jan 13, 2021
X-ray - a serial killer radiology tech turns up the radiation for all patients, knowing it's a perfect crime because the damage won't appear for years.
+1
Level 57
Jan 9, 2021
Why is 'Deadbeat' someone who evades child support payments?! I thought it meant tired. I can see how it might be used to describe a lazy person but I've never heard it used with this very specific meaning before. But I'm from the UK, so maybe it's a US thing...?
+1
Level 67
Jan 9, 2021
yeah I've never heard that either - only as a sort of general term for a dude who never makes any money. I'm Canadian, so maybe only in the USA, but it could be that I just never came across the real definition here.
+1
Level 76
Jan 11, 2021
US thing - A "Deadbeat Dad" does not pay his child support. In general, a deadbeat is someone who doesn't pay their debts.