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Foods in a Full English Breakfast

Name all the foods served in a traditional English breakfast.
According to the English Breakfast Society
Answers are in no particular order
Last updated: September 10, 2018
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Food
Back bacon
Eggs
Sausages
Baked beans
Food
Fried tomato
Fried mushrooms
Fried bread / Toasted bread
Black pudding
+4
level ∞
Jun 10, 2018
Before you whinge, here's what the source says:
"These ingredients may vary depending on where in the Great Britain you happen to be and are a subject that is still open to (sometimes quite fierce) debate, we acknowledge this, so please stop writing to us saying that they are wrong, these are the right ingredients in our learned opinion."
+3
level ∞
Jun 10, 2018
"The Southern English however would tell you that black pudding is something that was inherited from the Scottish, but the truth is that in the North of the country black pudding is widely consumed and viewed as an essential part of the traditional full English breakfast."
+1
level 61
Oct 8, 2018
I'm a Southerner, and I love black pudding
+14
level ∞
Jun 10, 2018
"Hash browns however are a controversial ingredient that many believe do not belong in a traditional English breakfast. We here at the Society believe that hash browns and french fries are used as a cheap breakfast plate filler in badly run cafes, by people who have no respect for our traditions."
+2
level 39
Jun 10, 2018
agreed
+4
level 75
Jul 10, 2018
This is not meant as a criticism or any form of negative comment, but I do enjoy bubble and squeak with the full breakfast. It just adds another "brick" to the mixture - then a long nap.
+1
level 62
Aug 29, 2018
Cheap plate filler in badly run cafes is tradition! Though it should be bubble n squeak, rather than hash browns or french fries (double abomination as 'french'!).
+2
level 58
Oct 7, 2018
But hash browns are one of the best bits
+2
level 28
Oct 7, 2018
French fries have no place in a breakfast. Hash browns, however, are cheap but lovely.
+2
level 61
Oct 8, 2018
Agreed. Although they are often on offer these days, there is no way that they are part of a TRADITIONAL English breakfast
+22
level 72
Jun 10, 2018
Well the English Breakfast Society seem a right barrel of laughs....
+1
level 74
Oct 7, 2018
I've ordered a lot of English breakfasts many places including England that came with hash browns, but I don't think I've ever had any with black pudding, and I only got mushrooms about 30% of the time.
+1
level 47
Oct 10, 2018
Yes but black pudding is traditionally part- and can be delicious. Hash browns are increasingly common - and tasty, but not traditional
+1
level 74
Oct 8, 2018
Thank you for accepting blood sausage instead of black pudding.
+2
level 74
Jun 10, 2018
I'm glad the English Breakfast that British Air served me skipped the beans and black pudding.
+4
level 75
Jun 10, 2018
But black pudding is the best bit!
+9
level 66
Jun 10, 2018
No beans?!?!? They hold it all together, otherwise it's a plate of nice but slightly dry, random bits.
+5
level 74
Jun 12, 2018
Maybe they decided that beans and airplanes don't mix, even in the name of authenticity.
+1
level 77
Jun 11, 2018
Be glad it didn't include WHITE pudding, which is even more... er... stomach-turning
+1
level 39
Jun 11, 2018
what is white pudding?
+2
level 71
Jun 11, 2018
So foreign that it should be eaten only once a week on any visit to Scotland, and with the same regularity on any visit to Northern Ireland.
+2
level 66
Jun 17, 2018
White pudding used to be 'liver Sausage' but sometimes people add pork meat to the liver and even oats to the recipe.
+1
level 74
Oct 8, 2018
Sounds a lot like scrapple.
+5
level 72
Jun 10, 2018
Some historical accounts suggest that "The Full English" was the reason for creating the NHS.
+7
level 66
Jun 10, 2018
Too England-centric.
+10
level 78
Jun 11, 2018
Too breakfast-centric.
+5
level 56
Oct 7, 2018
HAHAHAHA PCT like it! Plus it makes up for all the baseball, Montana's greatest moments and biggest cities in outer Nebraska we have to endure!
+12
level 63
Jun 11, 2018
I got 6/8 just from reading books set in England. However, the thing I'm most delighted to learn is that there's an English Breakfast Society. This is one of the most British/English things I've read.
+2
level 65
Aug 17, 2018
I got five by adding the food items in Irish breakfast. They probably don't have such a society.
+5
level 72
Oct 7, 2018
That's why they never had an empire, probably.
+2
level 71
Jun 11, 2018
I have been serving full English to a large group of friends one morning a year or over 20 years, but have never served fried bread. I is celebrated in many households, but is a step too close to diabetes for me. I have to date no complaints.
+3
level 67
Oct 7, 2018
But it can be the best bit. You don't need to douse it in fat - just a little to turn the outside a really crisp golden brown.
+2
level 74
Oct 8, 2018
Eating fried bread once a year won't bring you to the brink of diabetes.
+5
level 66
Jun 13, 2018
Any fellow cold baked bean eaters here?
+6
level 72
Jun 13, 2018
Pervert.
+1
level 56
Oct 7, 2018
haha! Here here mrnafe
+1
level 59
Oct 8, 2018
NO! Just no.
+3
level 66
Jun 17, 2018
Add a cup of hot / strong tea and I'm in.
+1
level 53
Oct 7, 2018
Tomato and mushroom, very nice. Meanwhile in our USA: 'Can I get a burger with no veggies?'
+1
level 59
Oct 7, 2018
Burger with no vegetables? You mean hold the ketchup?
+1
level 60
Oct 9, 2018
Onion?, Tomato?, Lettuce?, Pickles?
+2
level 74
Oct 7, 2018
what are you even talking about? Have you seen English food? Or an English breakfast? Looks like the greasy contents of a tipped over rubbish bin. Tastes about how you would imagine based on that description. And feels the same way while working its way through your digestive track. Meanwhile I've never known any Americans to order a hamburger for breakfast; and Baconator aside, rarely seen any burgers served later than breakfast without vegetables. Making myself a lovely fluffy omelette with chorizo, sundried tomatoes and pesto as I type this..
+2
level 54
Oct 7, 2018
Hmm... Not really sure what you mean generally by English food. If you specifically mean a full English breakfast then yes it is not very healthy. I don't eat the typical English diet by any means, but I'm just wondering if most of what people eat in England you would consider "English". We tend to eat a pretty wide range from different cuisines. Can't really think what you mean by "the greasy contents of a ripped over rubbish bin", if there's anything specific other than a Full English you would describe this way I'd be interested to hear it. Clearly though the idea that people eat burgers for breakfast in the USA is an exaggeration.
+1
level 74
Oct 8, 2018
That's true I've had great food in London it's just not usually what is thought of as traditionally English food.

Though when I have guests visit from overseas here and we go out to eat Thai food and Korean BBQ and pizza and sushi and Pho and Lebanese mezze and maybe some Cajun then I ask how they like American food they'll look confused and say we didn't have any American food.
I'll reply, of course we did, everything we ate was American. What does it matter if it was made originally by Italian or German or French immigrants in the 1800s, or by Asian or African or Arab immigrants more recently than that? It's all American now... and much like, for example, chicken tikka masala was first made in Scotland and is technically Scottish... all of the food you eat in the US regardless of who is making it, it still has an American twist and character.
+1
level 47
Oct 10, 2018
As a Brit who has just returned from a trip to the US - I enjoyed the breakfast there, although it was definitely inferior to a British one. Apart from breakfast, the food I have eaten in the US is not great - I've been a few times now, and keep thinking I am just eating in the wrong places or something, but I keep finding the same thing. There is some great beer there though. I am trying to be impartial - but based on my experience British food is superior to US food
+1
level 74
Oct 8, 2018
I know no one who eats burgers for breakfast, with or without veggies, but sausage and biscuits, Egg McMuffins, or ham and cheese croissants are popular here, which are worse IMO. Since I developed an egg allergy I usually eat a small salad, bowl of soup, or leftovers, or I occasionally join my husband in his usual breakfast of deer sausage, fresh side pork, tomatoes, and fried peppers - all from our farm. Would that make his a "half English"? (We used to enjoy fried mushrooms with it, too, until I had a bad reaction to a hen-of-the-woods and we stopped gathering them.) BTW, last week at his annual checkup the doctor said my husband was the healthiest patient he'd seen in weeks, but that's probably due more to the exercise he gets while growing or hunting our food.
+2
level 48
Oct 7, 2018
Please include "Antacid" as the final ingredient.
+1
level 59
Oct 8, 2018
Mushrooms has the lowest score yet it was the first answer I wrote! My English mum cooks a great English breakfast, but we would never have it for breakfast, rather for dinner.
+1
level 44
Oct 10, 2018
I am frustrated that there is no mention of devilled kidneys
+1
level 55
Oct 10, 2018
I've stayed at a B&B in the north-east of England that served a large lettuce leaf as part of its full English breakfast. My father insisted it was for decoration; I ate it. The B&B was run by Danes, to be fair.
+2
level 43
Oct 10, 2018
I think rashers should be accepted for bacon
+1
level 45
Oct 11, 2018
Hate hash browns! Mind you, I think it's probably because ive only ever had the frozen ones which are awful
+1
level 19
Oct 21, 2018
Being British, this is so easy!
+1
level 53
Nov 9, 2018
So I'm guessing haggis and black pudding are not the same thing.
+1
level 54
Nov 11, 2018
Definitely not.