Take another quiz >

Money Clichés

Fill the blanks in these clichés about money.
Quiz by finglehorn
Rate:
First submittedDecember 31, 2012
Last updatedJune 6, 2018
Times taken34,347
Rating4.26
4:00
Enter missing word here:
0
 / 22 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Cliché
Time is money
Money doesn't grow on trees
Bet your bottom dollar
Making money hand over fist
Rolling in the dough
A penny for your thoughts
Another day another dollar
Money is the root of all evil
Cliché
There's no such thing as a free lunch
A nickel ain't worth a dime anymore
A fool and his money are soon parted
Bring home the bacon
Money burning a hole in one's pocket
Put your money where your mouth is
Neither a borrower, nor a lender be
Worth its weight in gold
Cliché
A penny saved is a penny earned
The rich keep getting richer
Money makes the world go round
Laugh all the way to the bank
Don't bite the hand that feeds you
Penny wise and pound foolish
+10
level 52
Jan 6, 2013
I think it's, "The *love* of money is the root of all evil."
+2
level 50
Jan 6, 2013
I have heard it that way too.
+3
level 83
Jan 7, 2013
Typhon is correct, it comes from 1 Timothy 6:10 (especially KJV)
+1
level 61
Jan 21, 2013
Actually it's "for the love of money is the root of all KINDS of evil"
+1
level 67
Jun 2, 2018
A song by the Andrews Sisters "Money is the root of all evil, take it away, take it away, take it away"...... I remember it.
+1
level 55
Jun 18, 2018
As others have said, it's not the actual biblical quotation that the quiz is asking for, but the more common, everyday cliche. Still, it's interesting to know where the original comes from! "Neither a borrower nor a lender be" comes from Hamlet, by the way.
+2
level 28
Jan 7, 2013
I agree with lunatic jordan. the cliche' is correct
+1
level 80
May 30, 2015
look it up
+1
level 41
Jun 2, 2018
I believe it was also a line from Joh Steinbeck's 'The Pearl'
+1
level 49
Mar 23, 2018
form Pink Floyd'its Money is the root of all evil, today... ;)
+1
level 39
Jan 6, 2013
I love these clichés! Great quiz 18/22
+2
level 71
Nov 6, 2013
Me too. It's one of those phrases that's been misquoted so often that the misquote is now the norm, like "music soothes the savage beast" or "hell hath no fury like a woman scorned".
+1
level 46
Jul 24, 2015
Or "Pride goes before the fall"
+1
level 50
Jan 6, 2013
Good one. 100%.
+1
level 70
Jan 6, 2013
I don't know, I think this was a particularly easy quiz. Probably the easiest I've seen on Jetpunk. I didn't hesitate for even a second on any answer. This isn't to boast, its just to say, "too easy". These were just fill in the blanks for common everyday sayings, like, What goes up must come _________. Or, "To the victor goes the __________. etc. Good idea, but....
+2
level 32
Aug 1, 2013
There are quizzes literally as easy as 1+1 on here. This isn't so bad.
+1
level 46
Jun 18, 2018
Most quizzes aren’t. There’s the alphabet in 15 seconds, but that’s really the only one that easy.
+5
level 32
Mar 16, 2015
Well the average score is 17, so you don't seem to be quite on the money here.
+1
level 58
Jul 27, 2015
Ha ha. (Did you mean that to be a pun?)
+1
level 53
Jul 24, 2015
I love easy ones like this added to the mix. They're great for beginners to Jetpunk and they're good for waking up the old brain cells first thing in the morning and getting those fingers moving on the keyboard. Keep sticking them in every once in awhile. Maybe a "star" system could be added near the title to tell people the difficulty. Of course, that would spoil all the fun. Carry on!
+1
level 20
Jan 6, 2013
I've never heard of Penny wise and pound foolish. Also I can't believe more people didn't get Time is Money.
+1
level 83
Jan 6, 2013
100% with 3:07 left. That might be a bit too much time.
+1
level 49
Mar 23, 2018
lol I had to guess body parts for making money hand over (cause I always said foot) lol
+1
level 61
Jun 6, 2019
I guessed nearly everybody part there is (besides the stuff on the inside...)
+1
level 69
Jan 6, 2013
I'm surprised that nearly half of people didn't know "There's no such thing as a free lunch" when they did so well on most of the others. Or, given the current political climate, were they just skipping the question out of protest?
+1
level 21
Jan 6, 2013
I know right?!! I learned that cliche in Micro Economics class!
+1
level 76
Dec 6, 2015
I know as "There's no such thing as a free dinner," but lunch was my second choice
+1
level 49
Mar 23, 2018
its actually bs, unless say going out and taking a fruit off of a tree and eating it for lunch somehow costs the plant money that you stole from it by not paying it.. see where Im going with this?I could also eat roadklll, catch a fish, or someting like that. and have it still be a free meal. ;) economists are just greedy people who want to profit off of everything.
+2
level 38
Apr 20, 2018
^ The cliche is meant to warn you that when someone invites you out to lunch (or dinner if you insist), they usually want something from you in return.
+1
level 68
Jun 18, 2018
I always interpreted it as being about opportunity cost. When you eat lunch, you could be doing something else, and that something else is a cost of eating lunch.
+1
level 56
Jun 21, 2018
It's not meant to be taken that literally.
+1
level 61
Jun 6, 2019
Dont forget that many people on this site do not come from english speaking countries (atleast a quarter, if not a third or even more, because there are many people that never comment either). So if it isnt used a lot in books and movies (or the internet) there is no exposure to it. Some phrases are used more than others and only a little exposure to the english language will give you some of those. Like I dont know, rise and shine... you wouldnt know that by learning english from a studybook, but watch a few movies and you are bound to come across it ( might be better examples, but it was the first one that fit the bill that popped up.)

to get back to the quiz, a penny for your thoughts for instance, is much more likely to show up in a movie/books than many of the others.

+1
level 77
Jan 7, 2013
Never heard the last one. Must be a British expression.
+1
level 28
Jan 7, 2013
agreed. I was thinking penny wise dollar poor. but that didn't work clearly.
+1
level 51
Jul 30, 2013
It is. Connected to the "pound"
+1
level 76
Jul 24, 2015
I heard that expression quite a bit growing up in America in the '50s and '60s, but I never hear it these days.
+1
level 67
Aug 2, 2016
Maybe the 'Pound' clue gave it away.
+1
level 77
Jun 2, 2018
Note that I didn't demand the clue be removed from the quiz...
+1
level 61
Jun 6, 2019
ok, I ll bite. I ve never seen anybody demand an american answer/expression to be removed from a quiz.
+1
level 77
Jun 6, 2019
I've seen it many, many, many times.
"why is this quiz so Amero-centric? Can't you put on some questions about other countries??"
"I only missed question X because I'm not American. That's not really general knowledge it should be removed."
"There needs to be more extra-American questions here or else the title of the quiz should be changed."
"Do we really need so many questions about X,Y,Z??"
etc.
+1
level 52
Oct 6, 2018
just as the the nickel and dime one must surely be American, kalbahamut..........
+1
level 77
Jun 6, 2019
surely. And there's no problem including either.
+2
level 32
Mar 20, 2014
Penny wise, pound foolish is the British equivalent (roughly) of "stepping over dollars to pick up dimes"
+1
level 28
May 10, 2014
Money is not the root of all evil - it's the LOVE of money that is. 1 Timothy 6:10 10 For the love of money is a root of all sorts of evil, and some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs.
+1
level 49
Mar 23, 2018
yes we get it your fictional book of fairy tales mentions a cool pink floyd lyric. ;)
+1
level 77
Jun 18, 2018
That's the verse, but not the cliche.
+3
level 82
May 29, 2015
Don't people read at all what other people write before them?
+3
level 45
May 31, 2015
Because that would be too easy and using common sense...? Lol.
+1
level 76
Jul 24, 2015
The cliche attributed to Benjamin Franklin was being used in England in the 1600s as, "A penny saved is a penny got," (Ravenscroft), "A penny saved is a penny gained," (Fuller), and "A penny spar'd is twice got." (Herbert) http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/a-penny-saved-is-a-penny-earned.html
+2
level 61
Jul 24, 2015
"More Dollars than Sense" would have fit in nicely.
+3
level 50
Jul 24, 2015
too cash-centric... 3:22 left on the clock
+2
level 46
Jul 24, 2015
I wish we could like comments on here, cuz I would definitely like this one :)
+1
level 52
Oct 6, 2018
wow what a surprise.. i never connected the title with the content.....
+1
level 70
May 18, 2016
i always thought the saying was Making money hand over foot
+1
level 43
Aug 2, 2016
Yeah great quiz, always one you don't know. Gotta love jet punk as an education platform.
+1
level 42
Mar 12, 2017
Please accept "fed" for "feeds."
+3
level 70
May 10, 2017
Just had to throw my 2 cents in. :-)
+1
level 62
Jun 24, 2018
LOL
+1
level 65
Apr 19, 2018
One of these sayings reminds me of a joke. ... Q: What is the noblest of all dogs? .................... A: The hot dog. It feeds the hand that bites it.
+1
level 41
Jun 2, 2018
I've heard bring home the green and the dosh and bet your last and final dollar
+1
level 40
Jun 18, 2018
'There's no such thing as a free...' I knew it was food tried meal, dinner...didn't try lunch :p
+1
level 61
Jun 6, 2019
I thought ride...
+1
level 61
Jun 18, 2018
There is definitely a saying that goes "rolling in the Benjamins". Figured that was referenced in the picture.
+1
level 57
Jun 19, 2018
100%, 3:16 remaining. Fun!
+1
level 44
Jun 20, 2018
These are not really clichés. They are idioms or proverbs, but not clichés. Maybe consider changing the quiz title?
+1
level 62
Jun 24, 2018
Great point.
+1
level 77
Jun 6, 2019
They are definitely cliches. What do you think a cliche is?
+1
level 77
Jun 6, 2019
and bear in mind a phrase can definitely be both a proverb and a cliche at the same time. And proverbs and cliches can use idiomatic phrasing but few of the ones above do.
+1
level 53
Jun 21, 2018
Cash is king.
+1
level 62
Jun 24, 2018
Got all immediately except one: Making money hand over fist, never heard of that one???