Countries with the Oldest Median Age

Name the twenty countries whose citizens have the highest median age.
Source: CIA World Factbook as of 26 June 2020
Data does not exist for the Vatican
Quiz by relessness
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Last updated: June 26, 2020
First submittedJanuary 29, 2013
Times taken18,039
Rating4.46
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Median Age
Country
55.4
Monaco
48.6
Japan
47.8
Germany
46.5
Italy
46.2
Andorra
45.3
Greece
45.2
San Marino
Median Age
Country
44.9
Slovenia
44.6
Portugal
44.5
Austria
44.5
Lithuania
44.4
Latvia
43.9
Croatia
43.9
Spain
Median Age
Country
43.7
Bulgaria
43.7
Estonia
43.7
Liechtenstein
43.6
Hungary
43.6
Serbia
43.3
Czech Republic
+6
Level 70
Jul 26, 2017
Nothing surprising really, but my first 5 guesses were still wrong. Huh.
+2
Level 28
Nov 10, 2017
same...
+10
Level 68
Jul 27, 2017
I tried every country in Europe bar 5, needless to say all five are on the list.
+26
Level 83
Jul 27, 2017
It's not called the Old Continent for nothing.
+10
Level 57
Jul 29, 2017
Nice quiz! Japan is the only non-European countries on the list
+2
Level 82
Jul 5, 2020
Ack, totally forgot the Baltics!
+10
Level 59
Oct 23, 2017
Surprised not to see Vatican on this list
+5
Level 60
Nov 9, 2017
Data for Vatican is missing, that's why it's not there.
+2
Level 58
Nov 9, 2017
I'm pretty sure Vatican is absent from a lot of these quizzes.
+3
Level 55
Aug 1, 2020
If they were included the median age probably would be something like 70 and 80 I suppose
+1
Level 63
Nov 9, 2017
Surely the Vatican City is the highest by far............or do they not keep statistics?
+1
Level 52
Nov 10, 2017
There are no children in the Vatican, so of course the median age will be very high. But it is a fluke, so it would be ridiculous to include the Vatican.
+2
Level 69
Jun 26, 2020
According to the Vatican itself there was one birth inside the Vatican (from a Swiss Guard), so at least at some point there has been a child there. https://www.vaticanstate.va/it/stato-governo/note-generali/popolazione.html
+1
Level 67
Jun 29, 2020
but does the child live there?
+1
Level 36
Nov 9, 2017
How is China not on here
+5
Level 76
Nov 9, 2017
Chinas population has been increasing a lot over the past 40 years which means theres a lot young people being born
+4
Level 79
Nov 9, 2017
The "great leap forward." During the 1950s under Communist rule forced agricultural reforms and willful ignorance to accept that the failings of Communist policy led to massive starvation and somewhere between 20 and 50 million deaths in the country. The birth rate plummeted, the death rate skyrocketed, but after things stabilized and recovered somewhat there was a huge baby boom starting in the early 60s. As a result, the large bulk of China's population was born after 1962 and the median age is not very high. In about 20 or 30 years China will likely have one of the highest median ages in the world, though.

Jorissie: not so much since they implemented the one child policy in 1979. I'm sure this is what Tempest is referring to.
+1
Level 70
Feb 7, 2019
50.000 babies born every day in China, that's a lot of youngsters.
+1
Level 69
Aug 1, 2020
Not THAT much relative to the population. That's roughly 4 births a day per 100,000 people.
+2
Level 55
Nov 9, 2017
They are all European countries! Except for Japan.
+1
Level 59
Nov 9, 2017
Funny quiz. Actually, the European continent has not aged THAT much. A number of post-communist countries in the east have a high median age because young people have emigrated in the search of better jobs in the west. In the west they are not (yet) counted as part of the population because they don't have citizenship.
+5
Level 47
Nov 9, 2017
They are counted as part of the population of the new country
+1
Level 77
Jun 26, 2020
It's not only citizens
+1
Level 22
Nov 9, 2017
Europe is dying
+9
Level 54
Nov 9, 2017
Apparently not. That's why, of the 20 countries where people live longest from median average, 19 are European. See this quiz.
+6
Level 79
Nov 9, 2017
right because old people live forever. ::face palm::
+1
Level 43
Nov 9, 2017
I got all except Japan, and seems that Japan is most guessed one with only 4% not getting it XD
+1
Level 69
Nov 9, 2017
I did it. 100%. Wow.
+2
Level 74
Nov 9, 2017
So any of these would be a "country for old men"?
+2
Level 69
Nov 10, 2017
So the secret to living to an old age is to either eat lots of Mediterranean food or drink a lot of alcohol. Oh, and not have wars or immigrants. That's also important.
+1
Level 82
Apr 11, 2018
More like "don't have many babies" vs. "living to an old age". They just don't have nearly as many young people in these countries today.
+2
Level 53
Mar 18, 2019
It seems like "not having Republicans" also helps
+1
Level 75
Nov 11, 2017
So what are the factors involved? High life expectancy, emigration of young adults, possibly low population?
+4
Level 47
Nov 21, 2017
High life expectancy, fertility rate below the country's replacement level, net emigration, or high immigration of old people, poor economic opportunities, being rich for a long period of time (i.e. enough for low fertility rates to have lasted a couple generations). The European countries here tend to be Eastern Europe which have low fertility rates, relatively poor economic opportunities compared to other EU countries, Japan has, much like South Korea, China, Taiwan, Singapore etc. very low fertility rates, however is probably the only non-European country not to make the list as the other countries haven't been rich long enough for the fertility rate to make a big enough impact. I'm sure soon there will be many more Asian countries on this list. I'm sure cultural pressures in these countries are making fertility rates so much lower than in Europe as well.
+1
Level 58
Aug 3, 2020
Monaco, being a tax haven, is also the playground of the mega-rich, who tend to be older, so it attracts plenty of very rich people who settle there. I suspect that might be a factor with Liechtenstein as well.
+1
Level 26
Jan 25, 2019
100% at the first try, wow. I figured it would only be Europe and Japan on that list.
+1
Level 50
Dec 11, 2019
Croatia, Bulgaria, Serbia all surprised me, I didn't get them until the very end. I didn't expect them to have a very high age (Especially former Yugoslav countries). Slovenia was expected but Serbia & Croatia surprised me!
+1
Level 28
Aug 2, 2020
It's partly to do with low fertility rates and partly with high emigration of younger people due to low economic opportunities but good educational systems.
+1
Level 70
Jun 27, 2020
The secret is to have enough food, good access to medical care, hospitalisation, aged care, minimal opportunity for parasites and diseases to flourish, e.g. malaria, cholera, aids, ebola etc etc. temperate climate, smaller families, no religious fanatics or factions, comfortable living quarters, enough clothes, and good hygiene including toilet habits, bathing and food preparation being most important, honest police, army and government to minimise corruption and a free press......... that's all.
+1
Level 19
Aug 1, 2020
I’m surprised South Korea, Australia, and the Scandinavian countries weren’t on there. But I did notice if a country was there, the closest neighbor was often there as well, such as Spain and Portugal.
+1
Level 50
Aug 1, 2020
Quo vadis, Europa?
+2
Level 65
Aug 1, 2020
I literally typed every country in Europe EXCEPT Bulgaria!! 🤦‍♂️
+1
Level 48
Aug 1, 2020
For me it was Austria.
+2
Level 60
Aug 1, 2020
What's particularly interesting to me is that, other than Monaco, all of the top 4 countries are also former Axis countries.
+1
Level 78
Aug 1, 2020
I've got some kind of mental block on Japan. I forget it on every single quiz. No idea why.
+1
Level 38
Aug 2, 2020
100% and I got most of them in the last half.