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English Grammar: Parts of Speech

Can you name the 9 parts of speech in the English language?
Based on Wikipedia
Quiz by scambigol
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Last updated: March 21, 2016
First submittedDecember 29, 2015
Times taken8,992
Rating4.38
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Part of speech
Adjective
Adverb
Article
Conjunction
Interjection
Part of speech
Noun
Preposition
Pronoun
Verb
+1
level 60
Mar 21, 2016
Lol, "the" is the most common word, but (as the stats show) "Article" is the least common part of speech.
+1
level 71
Mar 21, 2016
Some people probably don't know what it's classified as, though.
+1
level 43
May 29, 2016
Yeah, article isn't really a part of speech
+2
level 48
May 31, 2016
Yeah, I remember learning in English II that Articles are often classified under one of the other categories (I think under adjectives).
+3
level 61
May 31, 2016
Articles are adjectives.
+2
level 55
Jun 1, 2016
noooooo articles are not adjectives
+1
level 73
Apr 7, 2016
In what way do the stats show it is the least common part of speech?
+1
level 63
Apr 9, 2016
Least known, he probably means. However, it has changed since he said that.
+1
level 60
Apr 12, 2016
True, it has. Maybe people read my comment before starting the quiz. Or the average could've been more accurate, with more takes.
+1
level 72
Mar 21, 2016
What about exclamations (eg wow! or damn!)? Maybe they are classed as interjections, but that doesn't quite fit because interjections are generally when you interrupt someone else.
+1
level 60
Mar 21, 2016
No, interjection has more than one meaning: one, yes, to interrupt another person, but two, an abrupt remark, typically as a part of speech, e.g. Ah! or Dear me!. - Google Dictionary.
+1
level 77
Mar 21, 2016
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_e24kdjdbtw
+3
level 78
Mar 22, 2016
Interjections show excitement or emotion. They're generally set apart from a sentence by an exclamation point, or by a comma when the feeling's not as strong. /SchoolhouseRock
+2
level 60
Oct 17, 2016
I work with words, but still had to think of Schoolhouse Rock to get all these.
+2
level 65
Apr 11, 2016
An article is a kind of "Adjective" which is always used with and gives some information about a noun. There are only two articles a and the, but they are used very often and are important for using English accurately. From Parts of Speech Chapter 9.
+1
level 60
Apr 16, 2016
incorrect - there are actually three articles: the, a, and an.
+3
level 55
Jun 1, 2016
no... no they're not adjectives
+1
level 74
Oct 17, 2019
"A" and "an" are nearly unique in European languages in that in other languages you use the word "one". They are actually derivative of German "ein(s)". "One" is most certainly used as an adjective. "The" serves the same function, but of an unspecified number.
An (One) article is an adjective.
The (Three) articles are adjectives.

Article without an article is just another noun.
+1
level 59
May 29, 2016
Since when has ANYONE called a connective (e.g. 'and', 'so', etc.) a conjunction? I have never heard anyone call it that. Please accept 'connective' as a valid type-in
+8
level 72
May 29, 2016
Since forever and always and everyone but you calls it a conjunction. I'm pretty good with English grammar and have never heard the term connective used to describe a part of speech. Maybe you subconsciously made up the term?
+1
level 33
Jul 4, 2016
You are Incorrect. Conjunction, Connective and Connector all mean the exact same. All my class teachers usually used connective as it is easier to say.
+2
level 61
May 29, 2016
By your name, I'm guessing you're not from the United States, as cricket is not all that popular in the U.S. Thus, you would naturally not be familiar with American nomenclature. "Conjunction" is the near ubiquitous, if not absolutely ubiquitous, name for that part of speech in the U.S.
+3
level 69
Jun 2, 2016
Yeah, I'm Australian and 'conjunction' is the only term I've ever encountered in schooling and beyond. Given that other commenters from the US and UK have also said they've only heard conjunction, I'm not wholly sure where in the English-speaking world this connective business is coming from. Any Kiwis, Canadians or Irish want to weigh in?
+5
level 61
May 31, 2016
I have never heard it called anything but a conjunction. Perhaps you've heard the 70's anthem "Conjunction Junction"? "Conjunction Junction, what's your function? Hooking up words and phrases and clauses. Conjunction Junction, what's their function? I've got 'and,' 'but,' and 'or,' they'll get you pretty far..."
+1
level 64
Jun 1, 2016
I live in Australia and I've never heard of connectives. I was taught Conjunctions and no alternative term. I'll never forget my FANBOYS.
+4
level 63
Feb 20, 2017
Conjunction Junction
If you don't have a song for it, it's not a part of speech. Sorry. That's the rule.
+1
level 74
Sep 24, 2018
What's your malfunction?
+1
level 74
Oct 17, 2019
You're thinking of tissue.
+1
level 3
Jun 17, 2016
Haha didnt know what it was before. :P
+2
level 24
Jul 7, 2016
Did anyone else sing schoolhouse rock to get some of these?
+1
level 71
Oct 11, 2017
If I hear one more person emphasize a preposition.....grrr!!
+1
level 53
Aug 28, 2018
determiner/determinative?
+1
level 46
Oct 16, 2019
What about expletives (a word that has no grammatical function)
+1
level 74
Oct 17, 2019
There's a famous skit about the F-word as any part of speech.