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Astronomy Quiz

Guess these facts about the cosmos.
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Enter answers in the area marked "Enter answer here".

You can enter any answer, at any time - they don't have to be in order

Punctuation and capitalization don't matter on JetPunk.

Hint
Answer
Our galaxy
Shape of our galaxy
Nearest major galaxy to ours
Demoted to dwarf planet in 2006
Most well-known space telescope
Place with such high gravity that not
even light can escape
Explosion of a large star
Cosmic expansion that happened
13.8 billion years ago
Interstellar dust cloud that can
give birth to stars
Brightest star in the night sky
Hint
Answer
Comet that passes nearby ever 76 years
Name for a "shooting star" that has
entered the atmosphere
Element that makes Mars appear red
Massive storm on Jupiter
Great Red Spot
It can be found between the orbits of
Mars and Jupiter
Asteroid Belt
Part of the moon where Apollo 11 landed
Sea of Tranquility
299,792,458 meters per second
Nearest star-system to the sun
Alpha Centauri
Densest type of star
Person who first described the elliptical
orbits of the planets
Answer Stats
Hint
Answer
% Correct
Your %
+1
level 68
May 29, 2015
Nice quiz! The link to user Kestrana in the instructions doesn't work.
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level ∞
May 30, 2015
Fixed
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level 80
May 30, 2015
The storm on Jupiter is called the "Great Red Spot", not the "Big Red Spot".
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level ∞
May 30, 2015
Fixed
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level 56
Aug 19, 2015
'big', 'great', 'giant'....close enough, don't you think? not all of us are astrophysicists.
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level 69
Aug 21, 2017
Some of us can't even spell astrofizz....that.
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level 61
Aug 19, 2015
Sorry to be a pedant, but Sirius is actually a binary star system (Sirius A and Sirius B). The brightest individual star is actually Canopus. Hot damn I'm cool.
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level 72
Aug 19, 2015
Epic fail, Sirius B is a negligible white dwarf.
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level 49
Jun 28, 2017
Arp2600 is right, the only luminosity Sirius B actually matters is in X-rays. Anyway, Canopus is like half a magnitude dimmer than Sirius from the distance it's at. If you're going by luminosity, then certainly Canopus is brighter, but then you also have to consider such powerhouses as Mu Cephei, Eta Carinae, the Pistol Star, and P Cygni. So let's just leave it at Sirius, shall we?
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level 71
Aug 19, 2015
Could 'Dog Star' work for Sirius?
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level 41
Aug 19, 2015
Agree. Dog Star is another name for Sirius.
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level ∞
Aug 19, 2015
Dog Star will work now.
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level 72
Aug 19, 2015
Didn't realize that, but it makes sense now that Sirius Black's animal form is a dog. I wonder if his brother Regulus would become a lion since Regulus is the brightest star in the constellation Leo?
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level 50
Aug 28, 2017
Haha just got that.
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level 70
Aug 19, 2015
I missed the brightest star question? Are you sirius??
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level 37
Sep 2, 2015
* shakes head....*
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level 58
Aug 21, 2017
Love this!
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level 45
Aug 19, 2015
Milkyway is a barred spiral galaxy, not a spiral galaxy
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level 58
Aug 19, 2015
It's not a spiral galaxy? A barred spiral sounds like a type of spiral to me!
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level 22
Feb 23, 2017
lol
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level 43
Dec 9, 2016
Sorry but I always thought it looked like a CD. 😜
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level 45
Aug 21, 2017
It's not clear if our galaxy has a pronounced barlike structure at the center. Most likely it is an SAB (which would mean that it does have a central bar structure, but one that is less evolved) or SBc (a barred spiral galaxy with loosely bound arms).
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level 68
Aug 22, 2017
Stephen Fry told me that we can't tell whether our galaxy is a spiral galaxy or not.

He does tend to bend the truth to try to trick Alan though.
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level 55
Aug 19, 2015
"Super nova" is a large nova. Nova should also work.
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level 52
Aug 21, 2015
agreed!
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level 49
Jun 28, 2017
Nova is actually a different type of event - the gradual accretion of material onto a white dwarf, for example, can cause a nuclear firestorm - a nova - where all the excess material burns off, and this can happen many times in a recurrent nova system where the white dwarf has a red giant companion it can siphon material off of. There are also type 1A supernovae, which is when in the same sort of system the white dwarf draws of enough mass from its companion to tip itself over the Chandrasekhar limit, or 1.4 solar masses. At this point it collapses further to become a neutron star, releasing a huge amount of energy in the process. For the supernova that most people know, that is a type 2 supernova - death of a high-mass star caused by the fusion of iron in the star's core.
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level 20
Aug 19, 2015
the storm on jupiter is also called eye of jupiter here in Australia.
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level 67
May 26, 2016
In almost three decades of living in Australia, I have never heard it referred to as that.
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level 62
Aug 21, 2015
Seriously, a little leeway on the spelling of Kepler. I put an extra "p" and it wasn't close enough.
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level 67
Aug 23, 2015
Thanks for the shoutout! Finally a quiz I can get 100% on :D
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level 20
Aug 26, 2015
One of d BEST QUIZZES EVER!i needed more time 2 put Kepler....any way d best quiz I ever played is this.its really appreciable quizmaster.i really enjoyed
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level 20
Aug 26, 2015
I also have a quiz it's good,try it even though it's not better than urs...
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level 66
Aug 31, 2015
Unless I'm completely mistaken, the Big Bang started 13.something billion years ago, but it's still happening now. Maybe "started" would be more accurate than "happened" for the question?
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level 49
Jun 28, 2017
No, the inflation period that started the expansion of the universe - the inflation period is the time that we refer to as the big bang (i think) - happened for a few tiny parts of a second and started the universe on its expansion that has continued ever since. We are not still living the big bang, that was 13.8 (13.7, whatever) billion years ago.
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level 45
Aug 21, 2017
The inflation period, as mahble said, lasted for tiny parts of a second in the very beginning, but that is NOT what we refer to as the big bang. For physicists examining the first seconds, 10⁻36 seconds actually makes a big difference. The first moment (when matter and even time "began") is called the "singularity", but often in popular science that singularity is "the big bang". Dunkinggandalf is almost right, often the whole ongoing process is called the "big bang expansion" (but perhaps not the big bang), and it has in fact been going on for 13.7 or 13.8 billion years.
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level 51
Jan 25, 2016
Loved it. Thanks so much. Love all the space quizzes!
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level 39
Feb 6, 2016
This is a great quiz but I wish it was a little harder, it was too easy for me!
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level 27
Aug 29, 2016
pluto is a planet again
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level 49
Jun 28, 2017
Nope it's a dwarf planet
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level 55
Nov 20, 2016
"Explosion of a star" is "nova." It's only a supernova for stars of a certain size. Also you could accept "c" for the speed of light. :)
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level 33
Dec 22, 2016
Nope, Nova is when there is a sudden runaway fusion reaction of hydrogen on a White Dwarf, appearing only in Binary Star Systems. Supernova is the actual explosion of a star, which only happens to Red Giants.
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level 49
Jun 28, 2017
There are also type 1a supernovae - collapse of a white dwarf to a neutron star
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level 60
Feb 20, 2017
I thought it was Rudyard Kepler. No?
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level 57
Mar 9, 2017
I don't think there's a Rudyard Kepler. Maybe you meant Rudyard Kipling? He was a writer though.
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level 45
Mar 7, 2017
A supernova is only when a massive star explodes; there are different types of novas for different types of stars and explosions
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level 35
Aug 21, 2017
No, nova is a term referring to a phenomenon in a binary star system. It's complicated, but basically one of the stars will become a red giant, leaving behind a white dwarf "core" that is pulled into its orbit. The remaining star will start to shed hydrogen which will eventually fall out of its gravitational pull and onto the dwarf. This will cause the appearance of a "new star." Eventually the dwarf will be pulled into the other star and the nova will end. Been into astrophysics since I was 8.
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level 45
Aug 21, 2017
TheNotoriousA is right. However, there are different types of supernovas for different types of stars.
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level 49
Jun 28, 2017
The nearest star is Proxima Centauri, but it is bound to the Alpha Centauri system as well. That's where that comes from.
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level 35
Aug 21, 2017
Pulsar for neutron star? I'm aware that they're not synonyms, but most pulsars (though some are white dwarfs) are neutron stars.
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level 45
Aug 21, 2017
I agree, and magnetars should also be accepted.
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level 54
Aug 23, 2017
I tried every color preceding "dwarf" and couldn't get it. I'm sure the answer is right, as I am not expert in astronomy, but I am proud to at least see a comment confirming that I did not completely invent that dwarves are among the densest stars.
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level 45
Aug 23, 2017
Actually, sorry to say jmellor13, but you are incorrect. Pulsars can be white dwarfs, but they are not that dense. The only acceptable answer here is some type of neutron star (magnetars are neutron stars, most pulsars are neutron stars). When stars collapse to form neutron stars, it becomes immensely more dense than it was before. All atoms are made up of mostly empty space, there is an extremely long distance between the center of an atom (protons and neutrons) and the closest electron-layer, compared to the size of these particles. When the star collapses into a neutron star, this empty space in all the atoms dissapears, what is left is only densely packed neutrons. It is fucking insane.
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level 39
Aug 23, 2017
Accept "Alpha Canis Majoris" and "Alpha CMa" for Sirius?
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