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British Food Words

Translate these foods and drinks from British to American English (US)
This quiz does not suggest that all British people use these words 100% of the time
Last updated: June 25, 2013
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British
American
Chips
Fries
Crisps
Chips
Biscuit
Cookie
Fizzy Drink
Soda / Pop
Courgette
Zucchini
Aubergine
Eggplant
Back Bacon
Canadian Bacon
British
American
Toffee Apple
Candy Apple
Rapeseed Oil
Canola Oil
Coriander Leaf
Cilantro
Candyfloss
Cotton Candy
Muffin
English Muffin
Maize
Corn
Ice Lolly
Popsicle
British
American
Beetroot
Beet
Broad Bean
Fava Bean
Fairycake
Cup Cake
Pawpaw
Papaya
Jacket Potato
Baked Potato
+12
level 34
Jul 15, 2013
I'm British and I've never used the term 'pawpaw' before, we always call it a papaya.Then again not many places sell them.
+2
level 34
Jul 17, 2013
agreed
+2
level 45
Oct 9, 2013
The pawpaw/papaya thing confused me, too. We have pawpaws here in Virginia but they are not another name for papaya -- they are pawpaw fruit that grow on a pawpaw tree. They're okay but a little squishy for my preference and the taste varies quite a bit. I've never seen them in grocery stores but they are available in September and October at the farmer's market.
+1
level 72
Nov 19, 2014
My British dictionary says "pawpaw" can refer to either the custard apple (whatever that is) or the papaya, with the former being the primary meaning. So perhaps custard apple is another name for the pawpaw you get in Virginia.
+1
level 59
Jan 13, 2015
A custard apple is not a 'pawpaw' it is a cherimoya.
+1
level 66
Jun 10, 2016
An Australian custard apple looks much like an apple made out of crocodile skin :o)........
+2
level 56
Aug 23, 2016
I've lived in North America, England and Australia - it's only known as pawpaw in Australia.
+1
level 26
Nov 17, 2017
that's right its native to our people.
+1
level 41
May 17, 2014
Ditto. Never called a papaya anything other than papaya. Never seen it advertised or referred to as anything other than papaya.
+1
level 53
Dec 20, 2014
A custard apple is another name for a persimmon.
+1
level 66
May 23, 2018
Never!, a Persimmon is nothing like a Custard Apple:
+1
level 36
Nov 17, 2015
I am also British and had no idea what a PawPaw is also I call it corn not maize.
+2
level 34
Aug 29, 2016
Pretty sure corn and maize are two different things.
+1
level 60
Feb 22, 2018
In England, corn traditionally meant wheat. English settlers in America called the plant they found there "Indian Corn", which became shortened to corn. English people in England called the plant and its crop maize - derived from an Amerindian language. variants of which word are used by other European languages, such as Spanish, as well. Under the influence of America, we have now become used to popcorn, sweet corn, corn on the cob and corn flour, in which the word "corn" refers to maize, not wheat.
+1
level 39
Jul 17, 2018
...it's called indian corn in america...
+1
level 45
Aug 24, 2018
if paw paw is the british why is it mention s In "The Bare Necceseties" when the song was written by an American......
+1
level 58
Jul 17, 2013
I really liked this! I'm Australian and we use a combination of the two: We say biscuits, toffee apple, coriander, beetroot, broad bean & pawpaw same as the Poms, and we say Zucchini, Eggplant, Canola, English Muffin, Cupcake (although as a child we called them fairy cakes) the same as the Yanks. BUT we call Fries "Hot Chips" and Crisps "Chips", we call Fizzy Drink "Soft Drink", we call Cotton Candy "Fairy Floss" and we call Popsicles "Icy Poles" or "Ice Blocks". I'm sure other English speaking countries also have some interesting answers!
+1
level 53
Jul 26, 2015
Yeah we also call fizzy drink "cool drink". I had no idea lava beans were broad beans, I used to wonder what Hannibal Lecter was talking about……ffvv ffvv ffvv ffvv!!!
+1
level 42
Sep 2, 2015
I agree! Our English roots and US influences have created a nice blend of both Englishes
+2
level 57
Apr 25, 2016
I wouldn't say any of those were American influences. They likely come from the same source the Americans got them from. For instance, zucchini is clearly Italian. Lots of Italians and Greeks in Australia.
+1
level 46
Feb 22, 2018
In my area of the US people very often call soda "soft drinks" as well, it's more common in the US than you may think! Also, some old folks where I grew up still simply say "drink," as in "Would you like lemonade, tea, or a drink?"
+1
level 66
May 23, 2018
In Australia Chips are not called Hot Chips, If you went into a Fish & Chip shop and asked for 'Hot Chips' you would get a strange look and a smart remark.
+1
level 56
Jul 17, 2013
the americans are so common. wow
+2
level 55
Jul 17, 2013
I don't think anyone in the UK would know what a 'pawpaw' is if you called it that, everyone I know/tv cooking shows would just call it papaya.
+1
level 36
Jul 17, 2013
the pawpaw is mentioned in a song in Jungle Book which I'm pretty sure is American, correct me if I'm wrong (like you need inviting)
+1
level 70
Aug 8, 2014
Jungle Book was written by Rudyard Kipling who was definitely British - born in colonial India. Animated movie was an American production
+2
level 55
Oct 8, 2014
"When you pick a pawpaw, or a prickly pear; and you prick a raw paw, then next time beware..." as sung by Baloo the Bear, but written by Terry Gilkyson, an American. So....presumably he chose 'pawpaw' as how the fruit is known in the US. It's a papaya to most UK chaps.
+1
level 60
Mar 30, 2016
Papaya is definitely known as papaya in the US. Pawpaws are a fruit that actually does grow in North America, and is related to the papaya, but are not that well-known here in the States by most people. Tropical papayas don't grow here (well, parts of Florida and in Hawaii, but that doesn't count), unfortunately.
+1
level 66
Jun 10, 2016
Pawpaw also grown in the north of Australia.
+1
level 74
Jun 10, 2016
American pawpaws are also called Hoosier bananas. The fruits are large and sort of kidney-shaped, about 6" long, and have large seeds. Cut one in half, remove the seeds, and eat the mushy flesh with a spoon. They taste like custard with banana or mango flavors.
+1
level 58
Mar 1, 2017
My nextdoor neighbour has a pawpaw tree, here in New Zealand.
+1
level 66
Jul 17, 2013
In Canada, we call it peameal bacon or back bacon, not Canadian bacon.
+1
level 66
Jul 15, 2018
In England it is called 'Middle Bacon', sometimes 'green' if not smoked or otherwise 'Smoked' The middle is a side of pork minus the long leg and the shoulder.
+1
level 50
Jul 17, 2013
But what about "banger in the mouth"?
+1
level 44
Jul 17, 2013
I'm an American who lives in England so you'd think I'd have no problem with this, but I actually missed a few. Never heard pawpaw before. But most embarrassing? I missed muffin --> English muffin.
+1
level 42
Jul 17, 2013
As a Canadian, I'm ashamed I didn't get "Canadian Bacon." Booooo. Also, I'm dumb and can't spell, apparently. I spelled popsicle as popcicle :(.
+1
level 40
Jul 18, 2013
Ice pop did not work either-
+1
level 3
Aug 1, 2013
isn't an English muffin the same as a American muffin?
+1
level 74
Jun 10, 2016
American muffins are more like cupcakes. They are usually sweet, and often have fruit and/or nuts or bran mixed into the batter. They are more of a breakfast food rather than dessert. English muffins are flat yeast rolls that are sliced, revealing large holes, and their cooking pans are spread with cornmeal, some of which remains on the top and bottom. They are the bread used in Egg McMuffins and Eggs Benedict.
+1
level 23
Oct 17, 2018
Yes, but they are called crumpets in England
+1
level 35
Sep 5, 2014
Hey guys! I am new to JetPunk. Please check out my quizzes and let me know what you think! :-)
+1
level 10
Oct 13, 2014
I'm british and when I took the quiz I was like................ what is a pawpaw? plus most the words were just old English. we don't say maize we say corn.
+2
level 66
Aug 9, 2016
I agree with pawpaw, but generally we do so maize, although obviously corn comes up in food names such as popcorn etc. But the thing itself is definitely maize in the UK.
+1
level 66
Sep 8, 2016
*say
+1
level 42
Mar 16, 2018
Not in my experience. Only heard maize used once and that was for marketing purposes than anything else- a cornfield maze called the Maize Maze. Otherwise it's corn
+1
level 73
Nov 25, 2014
I can't believe it didn't accept "popsickle". Apparently I've been spelling it wrong for a third of a century.
+1
level 59
Jan 13, 2015
Some confusion - it's not that we call Corn Maize. It's that we call Wheat Corn.
+1
level 36
Mar 6, 2015
I'm British and had no idea what a pawpaw is... I can safely say I have never heard that before. Also, I don't know anyone who says half these terms.
+1
level 10
Apr 5, 2015
Nobody calls papaya "pawpaw" and most people don't say fairy cake
+1
level 66
May 3, 2015
In Australia most people know this fruit as Paw Paw but two kinds of papayas are commonly grown. One has sweet, red or orange flesh, and the other has yellow flesh; in Australia, these are called "red papaya" and "yellow papaw", respectively
+1
level 37
Jul 26, 2015
think some of your answers are a bit dodgy, In Scotland its a baked potato, candy apple, and papaya.
+1
level 57
Apr 25, 2016
Well, then in Scotland, you're weird.
+1
level 45
Apr 16, 2016
Ironically we don't really have "English muffins" in England. If you ask for a muffin in England you'll get the sort of muffin you'd get anywhere else in the world - a small cake.
+1
level 57
Apr 25, 2016
Man, people cannot get over this pawpaw thing.
+1
level 43
May 7, 2016
Horrible.
+1
level 62
May 12, 2016
No one in the UK uses 'pawpaw' please fix this. And I personally have never heard anyone call a cupcake a 'fairy cake'.
+1
level 74
Jun 10, 2016
I watch a lot of British TV shows, and I hear fairy cakes mentioned occasionally. Never heard pawpaw, though.
+1
level 67
Jun 3, 2016
Ashamed to miss muffin. Seems obvious in retrospect. Somewhat surprised cold on the cob was not on the quiz.
+1
level 37
Aug 29, 2016
I call Muffins muffins (as in sweet: chocolate chip, blueberry etc) and english muffin (savoury breakfast item) as an english muffin. I am from Oxford
+1
level 70
Sep 19, 2016
As an Australian, in most cases this was more of a test of translating American terms than the British ones, which more often than not are the ones we use (except for 'courgette' and 'aubergine' - no need to get all fancy and French).
+1
level 36
Sep 26, 2016
Muffin and English Muffin...really?
+1
level 66
May 23, 2018
I think that 'Crumpet' is English for the American's idea of English Muffin, has little holes in the top (for butter and syrup) and is usually toasted.
+1
level 74
Sep 26, 2016
From what I understand. In British English the word "corn" is slang for whatever is the commonly grown grain in the area. So depending on the area of England you are in you can have wheat, maize, oats or barley referred to as corn.
+1
level 74
Sep 26, 2016
In the autumn, do the Brits go to a maize maze, like we do in the States?
+1
level 42
Nov 9, 2016
I'm british and I've never called Corn maize.. same with pawpaw and papaya
+1
level 45
Nov 28, 2016
As a brit, I can honestly say "pawpaw" is definitely not a term for a papaya. Also, muffins aren't necessarily the same as English muffins. Muffin also refers to the frostingless cupcakes same as in America.
+1
level 47
Dec 26, 2016
I am Australian, but have spent time living in both the US and the UK, and because of that, didn't have too much trouble. The one that I did get stuck on, was Toffee Apple, which is a term we also use in Australia, but in the US, I only ever saw caramel apples, which are obviously different.
+1
level 26
Nov 18, 2017
Try this quiz, it will test your knowledge of the groceries we buy in the land down under. https://www.jetpunk.com/user-quizzes/222845/most-common-grocery-foods-australia
+1
level 34
Mar 7, 2017
Just trying to think of what americans would say
+1
level 14
Apr 20, 2017
I'm English and have never heard anyone here use the word maize. We call it corn, or corn on the cob.
+1
level 51
May 2, 2017
American here, Northeast, can't remember the last time I heard somebody say popsicle instead of ice pop
+1
level 46
Feb 22, 2018
Really?! I'm American too but from the South (mid-Atlantic) and no one I know says ice pop. We all say Popsicle. Just goes to show how different we all are.
+1
level 26
Nov 18, 2017
Try this quiz, it will test your knowledge of the groceries we buy in the land down under. https://www.jetpunk.com/user-quizzes/222845/most-common-grocery-foods-australia
+1
level 46
Jan 16, 2018
I'm British and I've never heard of a 'pawpaw' before... we call it 'papaya'
+1
level 27
May 23, 2018
I'm English and would say baked potato rather than jacket potato (although people definitely use that term). Also corn rather than maize, papaya rather than pawpaw and bacon rather than back bacon.
+1
level 18
Aug 13, 2018
I have never once heard someone say PawPaw and I am English, I've always said papaya