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Cliche Quotes Quiz #3

Guess the missing words in these famous cliches.
Last updated: June 08, 2015
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Quote
The bigger they are, the harder they fall
Birds of a feather flock together
A chain is only as strong as its weakest link
Good fences make good neighbors
Good things come to those who wait
It's no use crying over spilled milk
Money is the root of all evil
One bad apple spoils the bunch
To the victor go the spoils
Too many cooks spoil the broth
Where there's smoke, there's fire
You can't put the toothpaste back in the tube
Quote
You have to break a few eggs to make an omelette
You'll catch more flies with honey than with vinegar
The devil is in the details
April showers bring May flowers
Beggars can't be choosers
Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me
Desperate times call for desperate measures
Feed a cold, starve a fever
Fortune favors the bold
Many hands make light work
Necessity is the mother of invention
Revenge is a dish best served cold
+1
level 83
Mar 15, 2012
Too easy.
+1
level 59
Mar 15, 2012
Can "too many chefs" be acceptable also?
+1
level 37
Mar 15, 2012
I think the "fool me..." phrase is backwards. I think it should be "Fool me once, shame on me, fool me twice, shame on you". But that's my opinion.
+7
level 71
Aug 22, 2013
Dubya? Is that you?
+1
level 73
Oct 26, 2013
LOL
+1
level 44
Apr 12, 2014
XD
+1
level 47
Jan 14, 2015
Haha yeah ForgingIron sounds like it could be his user name.
+2
level 70
Jun 13, 2016
"Fool me... You can't get fooled again!'"
+5
level 68
Nov 15, 2014
Your version misses the point of the idiom. If someone fools you once then they tricked you and that's a jerk thing to do. If they fool you again, then you didn't learn not to trust them the first time and it's your own fault. That's what the saying means.
+1
level 38
Apr 20, 2018
^ Yes! Thank you.
+5
level 69
Mar 15, 2012
It's "the love of money is the root of all evil." Money itself is neutral.
+1
level 49
Aug 13, 2013
This is correct.
+1
level 42
Dec 24, 2013
I think you should make "love of money" as an option too, since this is the actual quote from the Bible. (I Timothy 6:10 to be exact.)
+1
level ∞
Jun 8, 2015
Love of money will work now.
+2
level 69
Dec 26, 2015
Quizmaster says "love of money" will work now. But "money" should not work because of your comment. Money gets a bad rap. In proper perspective money is great. Its treating it like a god that gets you into trouble.
+1
level 78
Mar 15, 2012
Agree with Cicely; "fortune favours the brave".
+1
level 42
Mar 15, 2012
Yes, Quizmaster, it would be lovely if you would correct it to "Love of money" instead of just "Money". We do, after all, want to discourage greed, not trade. I also support the "fortune favors the brave" option. In any case, please please please take that errant apostrophe out of "it's weakest link".
+1
level 45
Apr 22, 2015
Why? It's a lot quicker to type money!
+1
level 32
Mar 15, 2012
Nope, it's just money.
+1
level 82
Mar 15, 2012
I've always understood the phrase to be "feed a cold, starve a flu." Also, Quizmeister (a user like everyone else) is not to be confused with Quizmaster (the person who makes and edits the quizzes).
+3
level 43
Mar 15, 2012
I agree with the bad egg- though can you really have a "bunch" of eggs or apples? "Detail" (singular) should also be accepted for the devilish clue. And I'm glad you didn't use George W Bush's version of the "fool me once" expression!
+1
level 59
Apr 4, 2018
I couldn't get that out of my head for a second while taking the quiz.
+1
level 34
Aug 12, 2018
It is apple,but I've heard it with barrel not bunch, One bad egg can ruin it for everyone (school teachers used to love to say that), The idea that one bad egg can spoil the other eggs makes no sense they have shells. Apples when one start s to rot it spreads to the neighboring ones.
+1
level 67
Sep 19, 2018
I second allowing "detail" singular, since "detail" can refer to the whole set of details of a thing, if that makes any sense. I would always use the singular in this saying.
+1
level 22
Mar 16, 2012
Only ever heard fortune favors the brave
+1
level 61
Mar 19, 2012
It's not just "Money", it is in fact, "The Love of Money." It comes from the Bible. Look it up
+1
level 34
Aug 12, 2018
I agree it is the 'love of money' and I thought of that, but tried 'money; first because it is such a misquoted idiom. I would allow both, but you are all correct. I live in America and have never heard too many hands spoiling the broth it is always cooks (or less often chefs). Fortune favors the bold is the most common. I have heard prepared as a newer version and I can't see how brave would be wrong, just never heard it that way..
+1
level 33
Mar 21, 2012
100% with 1:51 remaining
+1
level 28
Mar 28, 2012
In America we say "too many hands spoil the soup" so you may want to accept hands.
+2
level 53
Apr 20, 2014
Gee, I'm an American, and have always heard/said "Too many cooks spoil the broth". Or sometimes "soup". Never heard "Too many hands...". Regional variations, perhaps.
+1
level 75
Jul 26, 2018
Not in my neck of America.
+1
level 7
Jun 25, 2012
Can't you accept 'fortune favors the brave' as well?
+1
level 50
Nov 13, 2012
I always thought it was fortune favors the prepared. Or was that just from the Incredibles?
+1
level 21
Dec 12, 2012
I've never heard of the love of money is the root of all evil, so therefore the quiz is correct as is.
+1
level 38
Apr 20, 2018
^ Just because you never heard of the correct quote does not make it incorrect. The correct quote is: "The love of money is the root of all evil."
+1
level 34
Aug 12, 2018
Divantilya I love you for that! You are right just because it is oft misquoted doesn't mean it is correct. It is like people who say 'I could care less' who think they are correct. It is 'I couldn't care less' indicating there is nothing less important the other phrasing is basically saying it is of some importance which is meaningless.
+1
level 35
May 6, 2013
It should be 'Fortune favours the brave'
+3
level 38
Oct 16, 2013
chuck norris can put toothpaste back in the tube
+1
level 34
Aug 12, 2018
Or course silly!
+1
level 49
Dec 24, 2013
I've always heard it as "fortune favors the bold" as in the quiz, yet it does seem "brave" should be an acceptable alternative.
+3
level 67
Mar 3, 2014
I thought gazpacho was a dish best served cold.
+1
level 44
Apr 12, 2014
Or Vichyssoise.
+1
level 55
Aug 18, 2015
Watermelon.
+1
level 75
May 12, 2014
Another vote for fortune favors the brave.
+1
level 54
Aug 3, 2014
How about, "Fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice...that's a good curveball?"
+1
level 63
Sep 12, 2015
Can we add "Gazpacho is a dish best served cold"? Not a cliche, but I think it's a funny thought :)
+2
level 57
Dec 26, 2015
should accept singular "Detail"
+1
level 28
Dec 26, 2015
Totally agree. As in the detail of a contract being generic for the details therein.
+1
level 71
Feb 1, 2019
Yup, the devil is in the detail.
+1
level 67
Dec 26, 2015
The 'Andrews Sisters' many years ago sang "Money is the root of all evil" (hear it on Youtube) and I believe more people say that then " The love of money" version.
+1
level 66
Dec 26, 2015
Actually it is "the LOVE of money is the root of all evil".
+1
level 35
Dec 26, 2015
"For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil" Not THE root of all evil but A root of all kinds of evil. The greek new testament seems to show this.
+2
level 56
Dec 26, 2015
22/24. Never heard the "tube" one, is that really a common expression?
+1
level 20
Dec 26, 2015
'Detail' should be acceptable as well as 'details'. Apart from that, great quiz!! :D
+1
level 22
Dec 28, 2015
I couldn't spell omelette right
+1
level 37
Dec 31, 2015
to the victor 'goes' the 'spoils'
+1
level 52
Jan 8, 2016
The spoils go, not the spoils goes.
+1
level 70
Mar 26, 2018
Yes, it would have to be plural, though I've usually heard it without the verb at all, i.e. 'to the victor, the spoils'
+2
level 54
May 16, 2016
Surely "detail" as a singular should be accepted. I've never heard it used in the plural in this phrase.
+1
level 34
Aug 12, 2018
Never heard it without the plural. Meaning the details are what make things difficult.
+1
level 24
Jun 24, 2016
Could "vengeance" be accepted for revenge?
+1
level 69
Aug 25, 2016
This is me joining the chorus for accepting 'detail' as opposed to only the plural. The Wikipedia page on the saying uses 'detail' not 'details'. Typing the plural version simply redirects. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_devil_is_in_the_detail
+2
level 62
Jan 3, 2017
fool me once, shame on — shame on you. Fool me — you can't get fooled again
+1
level 58
Mar 14, 2019
Would have been great if it took that
+1
level 50
Jan 5, 2017
Fool me once, I'm mad. Fool me twice, how could you? Fool me three times, okay you're officially that guy; you know the one.
+1
level 61
Feb 10, 2017
I always heard the term "beggars can't be choosy." And choosy Mom's choose Jiff.
+2
level 51
Jul 18, 2017
I thought it was "Fool me once, shame on, shame on you. Fool me, you can't get fooled again."
+1
level 70
Mar 26, 2018
Haha
+1
level 38
Apr 20, 2018
I guess no one on this quiz ever mixed-up their idioms or metaphors. Bush can't seem to get a break, even in quizzes. Since some are so fond of quoting the bible, try this on for size:"Let he who is without sin cast the first stone."
+1
level 43
Feb 1, 2019
Mixing metaphors is great fun, but you have a point. I have to make sure all my ducks are covered.
+1
level 40
Apr 23, 2018
my flies landed on something less savoury!!
+1
level 52
Jun 3, 2018
I know "the devil is in the detail" not details, but detail doesn't work.
+1
level 34
Aug 12, 2018
I don't really understand the use of detail and not details. Can you explain that one. I have always heard it as details as in the details are what make things difficult. ie, You can come to and agreement in general, but ironing out the details is the hard part, Or when working on a project the general solution is easy, but the details are where all the work lies. What is the meaning of the phrase as you folks understand it with the singular, because it really doesn't work with the meaning I've always heard it used? Thanks for the explanations in advance, perhaps I've been missing out here.
+1
level 67
Sep 19, 2018
I think it's because "detail" singular can be used to describe the whole set of details of a situation, i.e. "the level of detail for this problem is devilish".
+1
level 67
Sep 19, 2018
Hadn't heard the "feed a cold, starve a fever", and read it as "if you feed a cold, then you will starve a ....". First thing that pops into my mind is "child". I feel like this suggests bad things about my mind.
+1
level 52
Sep 26, 2018
always thought the apple one was banana... bananas come in bunches (OK hands if you are being pedantic)....., apples dont come in bunches, although i have heard barrel used in the apple one
+1
level 35
Nov 13, 2018
I've always heard "feed a cold, starve a flu." Fever makes sense, but I think flu should also be an acceptable answer.
+1
level 43
Feb 5, 2019
I always understood it to be 'detail' singular 'the devil is in the detail'
+1
level 46
Apr 6, 2019
First off, it seems like noone reads the comments, I see the same complaints over and over, written in a way like they are the first to mention it.. (it is the same 3 subjects repeated like 20 times each..)

and the fortune favors... is avtually from latin (not any of the dozens tv shows/games etc that have used it) the original is "audentes Fortuna iuvat" (yes with a capital F).

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