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Historical Blunders

Answer these questions about famous historical blunders.
Two of these are apocryphal
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedApril 4, 2013
Last updatedOctober 17, 2015
Times taken39,870
Rating3.93
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Blunder
Year
Answer
Germany invades this country
1941
Soviet Union
The Japanese launch a surprise attack on this naval base
1941
Pearl Harbor
The US becomes entangled in this conflict
1965-1973
Vietnam War
Citizens of this city allow a hollow Greek horse inside their walls
?
Troy
The captain of this ship ignores warnings of icebergs
1912
Titanic
The CIA botches an invasion at the Bay of Pigs in this country
1961
Cuba
Allied troops begin a futile attempt to capture the
Gallipoli peninsula in this country
1915
Ottoman Empire
This military leader decides to invade Russia
1812
Napoleon
This fleet is sent to invade England, but loses many ships
without even attempting to land
1588
Spanish Armada
The Catholic Church attempts to capture the Holy Land in this series of conflicts
1095-1291
The Crusades
The Soviet Union invades this country
1979
Afghanistan
Despite overwhelming odds, this commander chooses to fight at
the Battle of the Little Bighorn
1876
George Custer
General Pickett leads the Confederate Army into a suicidal charge at this battle
1863
Gettysburg
Richard Nixon and G. Gordon Liddy orchestrate a plan to break into
the Democratic Headquarters at this hotel
1972
Watergate Hotel
After just a few weeks in Iraq, George Bush stands underneath
a banner proclaiming this
2003
Mission Accomplished
European powers try to appease Hitler by allowing Germany
to annex parts of this country
1938
Czechoslovakia
Aztec emperor Moctezuma allows this conquistador to enter his capital city
1520
Hernán Cortés
Adam and Eve eat the fruit of this tree
?
The Tree of Knowledge
+5
level 59
May 17, 2013
I'm confused whether you mean Pearl harbor was a blunder for the Japanese or the U.S. because it was a rather well executed attack. Yes, the japanese lost, but their attack was well planned and was mostly considered a success except that the aircraft carriers were not in the harbor so they were not harmed.
+11
level 77
May 17, 2013
right, what Macho said. The attack was a pretty huge success, however, getting the US involved in the war was a terrible mistake that ultimately cost Japan everything. The one thing on this quiz I would NOT call a blunder would be the Crusades. How was that a blunder? The Crusades were successful in pushing back Muslim invaders who were threatening Europe on all sides, and even successful at capturing "the Holy Land" for quite a while- The Kingdom of Jerusalem alone lasted almost 200 years, and remnants of the Armenian kingdoms set up at the same time still exist today. So Jerusalem was eventually lost to more Muslim invaders... but calling the original Crusade a blunder because of this would be like saying the English colonization of the Americas was a blunder because hundreds of years later the British Empire fell apart. Doesn't make much sense.
+4
level 44
May 17, 2013
I agree with all that. The Crusades as a whole were more advantageous than disadvantageous. However, there were several individual crusade attempts that were very huge blunders. The question would fit if it was more specific.
+2
level 75
Sep 21, 2014
The Crusades were a messy & exhausting imbroglio -- as soon as you dip beneath the surface of the storybook version. The disaster was a pretty unrelenting parade of pointless slaughter, military blunders and viciousness, which included cannibalism under siege; children, poor people and thugs wandering to the 'Holy Land' fight with no plan/supplies (many of them died/were enslaved en route); and no territorial or strategic advantage for the Crusaders despite generations of warfare. The Crusades are nicknamed "Medieval Europe's Lost Weekend" for a reason. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massacre_at_Ayyadieh As a side note the Robin Hood figure emerged from a time when "evil" King John had to keep raising taxes to pay the ransoms of his brother Richard "the Lionhearted" who was foolish enough to keep getting captured -- leading directly to concessions that John made, named the Magna Carta. As far as I'm concerned, the Magna Carta is basically the real and lasting victory of the Crusades.
+2
level 64
Aug 24, 2015
The First Crusade is the only one that you could consider successful for the reasons stated above, but when you consider that the Crusades are also part of the hatred of the West by many in the Middle East, and thus a contributing factor to the current state of terrorism ongoing in and from the region, I think it looks like a pretty clear blunder. Muslim religions of that time were moving slowly towards secularism - holy warfare from the Crusades sowed the seeds we are reaping now (admittedly, among many other contributing factors).
+7
level 77
Oct 17, 2015
oh come on. The Crusades have nothing to do with terrorism or hatred of the West.
+4
level 53
Oct 17, 2015
I'd say from the Fourth Crusade and all others after that, they were blunders, but the First and Third were mostly successful.
+7
level 37
Oct 17, 2015
Using the crusades as an excuse for all the vile hatred festering in that region nowadays is a prime example of Western arrogance combined with Western self-hatred.
+3
level 53
Oct 18, 2015
The crusades were aggressive not defensive kalbha. The same story always comes out of you, your continued one sided way of looking at things is getting more obvious than ever.
+1
level 57
Oct 19, 2015
Boujesus has it well enough. There was a "Children's Crusade" towards the end that was just horrible. I think they (Europeans) wandered around, not being able to actually get to Jerusalem and starved to death.
+1
level 34
Jul 25, 2016
The First Crusades were a "success" for the Christian's I supposed by the following ones were total failures, for them.
+1
level 34
Jul 25, 2016
Something which hasn't been mentioned about the crusades was that they did stop infighting for a while in Europe and made them agree with eachother, before falling back to war with eachother. Small victories, right?
+1
level 77
Sep 6, 2017
Tecumseh- you're insane and this is a well-documented fact on the pages of this website.

The rest of you make reasonable points.
+1
level 65
Feb 26, 2018
Well the Children's Crusade was pretty successful for the people who sold them to slavery
+1
level 49
Jul 26, 2018
Calling the First Crusades "defensive" is misleading, and not a view shared by most historians. The notion that they were needed to confront Muslim incursion worked well politically, but ultimately there were other reasons that were truly the driving causes.
+2
level 77
Feb 19, 2019
What historians? You mean the guy in your Liberal Studies class who wants to blame everything on White people? The Seljuk Turks conquered Jerusalem closing off the city to Christian pilgrims. Then they were threatening to take Anatolia and Constantinople (which the Ottomans later would), the most important city in all of Christendom. Byzantine Emperor Alexius I made an appeal to the pope for help against these foreign invaders. Urban II launched the 1st crusade as an effort by all Christians to defend the Christian world and retake the Holy Land, specifically Jerusalem.

Many of the later Crusades were much more cloudy and involved various states or individuals, the doge of Venice notably, making power or land grabs, but the motivations behind the first one couldn't be more clear cut.
+1
level 46
Sep 13, 2019
There is a balance. The Crusade was triggered by the Byzantine emperor's call to help but a lot of other factors were at play as well (particularly by the Pope who used it as a position to establish papal authority).
+2
level ∞
May 17, 2013
I guess Pearl Harbor and the Crusades were blunders in different way. Pearl Harbor was a blunder in a strategic sense, the Crusades were blunders from a tactical standpoint. I am currently reading Churchill's history of WWII. When Pearl Harbor happened, he slept soundly because he knew that victory was now inevitable.
+2
level 70
Sep 21, 2014
What would 'victory' have looked like to Japan after the attack? Taking Hawaii? Taking the US mainland? The attack was indeed well planned and executed, but to what end?
+2
level 71
Oct 13, 2014
Their ultimate aim was to "conquer" most of south-east Asia, and possibly Australia. If they knocked out the US Pacific fleet, they would have had military control of the whole western Pacific, given that most of the world's attention at the time was on Europe
+3
level 78
Apr 18, 2018
I completely agree that the attack was successful, but as you said "what to do next?" is the blunder. Even Admiral Yamamoto, the brilliant planner of the attack, compared it to poking a sleeping giant, but as a devoted and patriotic member of the Japanese military establishment, he did what was required of him. I don't think that the embargo was a major issue. It was just a political tool to try to force Japan out of Manchuria. A bigger issue was the need for Japan to have complete access to the resources of SE Asia - oil, rubber, tin, rice so that they could achieve their "destiny" to rule the four corners of the world and the US Navy stood as a barrier to that goal.
+2
level 75
Oct 17, 2015
The attack was a blunder because it could have been worse for the US. The Japanese didn't attack the oil tanks or the navy yard (they weren't even part of the objectives), furthermore, they had a chance to deploy a third wave of attacks, aiming at the ammo and maintenance facilities, but they didn't launch it. Had they done anyone or both of these things, the US would have needed more than a year to recover (This conclusion was said by Admiral Chester Nimitz). So yeah, they did damage and produced a heavy death toll, but it could have been worse, both in the human lives and in the warfare development.
+3
level 57
Oct 19, 2015
Additionally, the US carrier fleet was out on training exercises during the attack. Had the Japanese sunk American carriers in the harbor instead of the destroyers, the US Navy would have had an extreme tactical disadvantage for a few years while rebuilding. Midway could not have been won without a carrier fleet intact. The eventual importance of mobile air power was not foreseen...
+1
level 47
May 26, 2016
Pearl harbor was a failure on both sides. The Japanese were out to sink the US aircraft carriers. They weren't even there.
+1
level 60
Aug 3, 2018
I was gonna say. Pearl Harbor might have led to the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki but it had the desired effect of having the U.S. drawn into the war.
+1
level 56
Feb 19, 2019
Didn't they only sink one ship?
+2
level 70
May 17, 2013
Great quiz. I liked the last entry
+2
level 44
May 17, 2013
The Bush question wasn't really a blunder. He was on an aircraft carrier which was returning home after completing its objectives. He was speaking to servicemen who had accomplished their mission, hence "Mission Accomplished."
+5
level 77
May 17, 2013
While technically you are correct, the move was obvious more of a PR stunt than a message to any specific servicemen, and in that respect, it was a blunder. It did a lot more harm than good for Bush's image and popularity.
+1
level 58
May 21, 2013
Couldn't help but notice when he opened his 'library' he didn't have that banner proudly displayed there. Wonder why?
+2
level 45
Aug 29, 2013
At the time his intention was to justify his attack of Iraq. The "mission" took almost ten more years to complete -- some say it's still ongoing.....
+1
level 63
May 17, 2013
I know I wrote Gettysburg, but it didn't take! Ugh, must check my spelling more carefully. I'm totally giving myself credit for that one.
+1
level 71
Oct 17, 2015
Don't worry--the quiz maker misspelled "Pickett" as "Picket," so you're in good company.
+1
level ∞
Oct 17, 2015
Fixed the spelling
+3
level 73
May 17, 2013
I have a feeling that in a few years, the Benghazi attack and the alleged cover up in an election year might find its way on this quiz.
+1
level ∞
May 17, 2013
I doubt it. Whereas the Iraq War defined George Bush's presidency, Benghazi is a footnote in Obama's. I'm not even really sure what it's all about. But I guess time will tell.
+2
level 61
Jun 28, 2013
I doubt it as well, but not because it is insignificant. It will disappear into the background because the media will make sure not to give it much attention.
+1
level 77
Jun 27, 2018
^ agree with what ctleng said, except... actually... the exact opposite of what ctleng said. Benghazi: insignificant even despite the fact that the media can't shut up about it and Congress has wasted millions and millions of dollars trying to blow it up into something it wasn't.
+1
level 70
Sep 12, 2019
It's disgusting that Benghazi is a footnote in Obama's presidency. There is no way he would have survived the press if they went after his lies half as hard as they did the Russia hoax. As far as what was Benghazi, it was a complete failure of the administration to listen to the request by an ambassador for added security in a volatile region resulting in an attack and only murder of a US ambassador on foreign soil. During that attack Obama ignored requests for military back up, breaking the #1 rule of leave no man behind, using the flimsy excuse that they wouldn't get there in time -- he didn't even try. To cover up his failure as President and Commander in Chief he blamed the attack on a video and sent an innocent man to jail. This was also the failure of Hillary since she was Sec of State.
+1
level 70
Sep 12, 2019
Also, it was very significant since the reason for the attack has been reported as an attack on the gun running operation by Obama's CIA through Benghazi to Syria. There is suspected additional deaths that could not be reported due to the illegal operation. But, again, the press doesn't do it's job when they have a "favored" president in office.
+1
level 77
Sep 13, 2019
kap: you are very very confused.
+1
level 77
Sep 13, 2019
The Republicans in Congress had 33 hearings on Benghazi and conducted multiple Republican-led investigations into Hillary Clinton's State Department, wasting millions upon millions of tax payer dollars, all for something that they *knew* full well was bullpoop as some of them admitted, on camera, that there was nothing at all going on except an attempt to hurt Hillary Clinton politically. EVERY SINGLE ONE of these partisan Republican-led investigations found NO WRONG DOING at the State Department or by Secretary Clinton, and certainly not by Obama who wasn't even accused. That didn't stop a huge segment of the media (the one that you watch, obviously) from beating this dead horse nonstop for years, though.

On the other hand, the Russia investigation, which was launched by lifelong Republicans, led and pursued by lifelong Republicans, investigating a Republican president and his associates, ended with hundreds of indictments, many guilty pleas already from among Trump's closest
+1
level 77
Sep 13, 2019
associates with more potentially on the way from spun-off investigations, several lengthy jail sentences, and a 400+ page report that details numerous crimes by the president and makes it clear that if not for DOJ precedent Trump himself would also be currently indicted if not in jail. If the Democrats have any guts they will impeach him, even though the craven Republicans in the Senate are likely not to remove the man from office, and if he's voted out in 2020 which seems likely he could very well go to jail yet.
Meanwhile, Russian attacks against American democracy continue, as EVERY US intelligence agency (most led by Republicans) agrees on, while Mitch McConnell refuses to do anything about it, and Trump has publicly stated that he would welcome it. Wake up.
+2
level 77
May 18, 2013
blunder for whom? The Republicans? I doubt it will do them much harm. I mean, they've now voted to repeal healthcare reform 38 times so it's not like their supporters aren't used to seeing them beat a dead horse.
+5
level 77
Jun 27, 2018
Update: Republicans voted to repeal the ACA more than 70 times while Obama was in office, wasting enormous amounts of time and tax payer dollars doing so, knowing that Obama would veto the repeal every time.
but once Trump was in office and they controlled all 3 branches of government, they decided that they didn't really want to any more, because it's a horrible idea that will hurt them politically and they only ever used Obamacare as a way of getting people angry at the president anyway- they all realized it was not as bad as they were saying. Except, of course, for Trump who is even more stupid than the average voter and is still trying to act on all the baloney that gets put out there by right-wing propagandists.
+4
level 77
Jun 27, 2018
Meanwhile, mysteriously, ever since Hillary lost the election nobody in Washington has mentioned Benghazi even once. You would almost think that some of these people aren't entirely honest and that they only act concerned or interested about things that they think will benefit them politically.
+2
level 50
May 17, 2013
I disagree that Adam and Eve's decision was a blunder. Without it, none of us would be here and God's plan would have been frustrated. Yeah, life's hard, but hey, we're here, aren't we? And there is joy to be found.
+1
level 38
Oct 30, 2018
^ Blended cow: What makes you think that if Adam and Eve hadn't disobeyed, we wouldn't be here? - It seems to me that not only would we be here, but under far better conditions than we are now.
+1
level 57
Mar 13, 2019
If Adam and Eve hadn't disobeyed God we would be in precisely the same conditions we are in now.
+4
level 27
Feb 19, 2019
The Adam and Eve thing shouldn't even be on this quiz, it's not historical.
+1
level 40
May 17, 2013
pretty sure its the tree of life...
+1
level 62
Oct 19, 2015
There were two trees. The Tree of Life was the other one that's never mentioned again. Because the Bible has terrible writing.
+1
level 66
May 26, 2016
or it's just been changed so many times that those things tend to slip through the cracks
+1
level 76
May 17, 2013
17/18, got all but The Tree of....Apples?? Oh well.
+1
level 40
May 18, 2013
There's actually some pretty good evidence that Hisarlik... the site generally recognised as Troy was destroyed by Greeks at about the 'right' time. Even the wooden horse may have some basis in fact. The thinking is that it was an ancient siege weapon, used to breach the city's walls.
+1
level 77
May 20, 2013
There are something like 8 or 10 different ancient cities stacked one on top of other there. Some of the evidence potentially confirms parts of the Iliad and other evidence contradicts it- though all in all the story seems far more likely than the story of Genesis, and is probably at least based in part on *something* that happened.
+2
level 40
Jun 6, 2013
I don't think you're going to out Troy me Kal... I did this at uni. Troy 7a is most widely recognised as being the 'right' Troy. And there is independent evidence of the city being destroyed by Greeks at about the right time from ancient Assyrian texts. So it's not a slamdunk cert... but pretty close to it. As to Helen and Achilles and all that... poetic licence most likely.
+1
level 77
Sep 6, 2017
Is it a competition? If so, I visited the place. And I also attended university. So...
+1
level 23
Jan 11, 2014
Even though some crusades were directed towards recovering the holy land, many of the crusades attempted to damage Byzantium and the Islamic Empire.
+1
level 57
Sep 21, 2014
I clearly need to brush up on my US history - it always lets me down!
+1
level 73
Aug 6, 2015
Can you add to accept "the knowledge" since as the answer stands now, it's not grammatically correct? I was going in circles trying to figure it out since I kept typing "the knowledge of good and evil" and it wasn't working.
+1
level 49
Oct 17, 2015
I typed "Crusades" and nothing happened. Then I moved on, unnoticed that it is "THE Crusades". Ugh.
+1
level ∞
Oct 17, 2015
Crusades would have worked. Any error that bad would be quickly noticed and corrected within a couple days at most.
+1
level 72
Oct 17, 2015
Reading all the feedback on this one has been very fascinating.
+1
level 59
Oct 18, 2015
You read all of the feedback? Man, I don't have the time for that!
+1
level 62
Oct 17, 2015
It's Pickett. Also, you should accept Pickett's Charge.
+2
level 75
Oct 17, 2015
There is no evidence that Nixon was aware of the Watergate burglary until after the fact.
+1
level 77
Jul 20, 2019
Is this a thing that people believe now? Are these the same people who believe that Trump never met a Russian before and probably doesn't know his own lawyer or any of the many members of his campaign in jail or charged with crimes?
+1
level 70
Sep 12, 2019
The Russia hoax has been debunked and there was no proof that Nixon planned (as this question suggests) Watergate. I pity any innocent person being charged with a crime if you end up on their jury.
+1
level 77
Sep 13, 2019
I pity any member of a democracy that contains you in its electorate.
+1
level 58
Oct 17, 2015
I do not believe that the "Mission Accomplished" sign should be on this quiz. If you'll notice the huge gap in answers you'll see. Maybe you can add something about Iraq. On a related note, I do not think that "The Tree of Knowledge" should be on here because, frankly, it's not myth but legend. The same goes for the war in Troy. Maybe something about Hannibal using elephants to invade some country that I don't recall at the moment. You also have way too many Soviet Union questions and not nearly enough time to finish on your first shot. Some of these require thought. Quizmaster, maybe some of these questions are a little too specific and some are rather broad. I doubt that the Soviet Union was the only country Germany invaded in 1941. You are also portraying Germans in a bad light..take into consideration all the help they are giving refugees into Syria. Speaking of, maybe you can add something about starting the Syrian civil war. I think that would be a MAJOR historical blunder!!!
+2
level 66
May 26, 2016
The soviet union is huge and were involved in many wars. they've been invaded unsuccessfully several times so it's not unfair to have them on here a lot. Also, "painting Germans in a bad light" is not an argument. All these things happened (with the exception of troy and adam & eve) if you don't like facts then don't do quizzes.
+2
level 53
Oct 17, 2015
Kinda surprised there was no mention of the British cavalry charge on the Russian guns in the Battle of Balaclava, best known as the Charge of the Light Brigade. Especially since the quiz title made me think of a line from the Tennyson poem....
+1
level 77
Jul 20, 2019
still not as disastrous as the charge for baklava after dinner at a Lebanese restaurant.
+2
level 61
Oct 17, 2015
The Adam and Eve question definitely should not be on this quiz, as it was not a historical event. Also, some of these "blunders" are still under dispute, such as Vietnam.
+1
level 62
Feb 19, 2019
I agree on the biblical question. To even call it apocryphal is generous.
+1
level 38
Mar 13, 2019
Elan: Not historical? - It was at the very beginning of the history of Mankind!
+3
level 57
Jun 1, 2019
No, what happened at the very beginning of the history of mankind was that the Flying Spaghetti Monster created a mountain, trees and a midget. We all come from pirates, who came from midgets, who came from that original midget.
+3
level 67
Oct 17, 2015
It's just a little quiz, not a blueprint for life.
+1
level 23
Oct 23, 2015
The Soviets in Afghanistan wasn't really an invasion as they where invited by the Afghan government, which was then a communist government, which had been established through a coup led by the Soviets. So yeah, intervention would be a better word since they never invaded the country. And yes, even though they invited themselves into the country it still wasn't and isn't considered an invasion.
+1
level 66
May 26, 2016
whatever you call it, it ended up being a bit of a blunder.
+1
level 64
Dec 10, 2015
The Crusades were pretty successful, at least some of them, and of course from the Europeans' point of view. And in my opinion, Napoleon's invasion of Russia and the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor are tied for the stupidest things ever done. Period.
+1
level 38
Jan 27, 2017
All of this bloodshed through the ages in the name of religion! Is it any wonder that Marx said the religion was the opiate of the masses? - I believe in a Superior Being named Jehovah, his only begotten son, Jesus Christ and the Holy Bible. But PLEASE - save me from organized religion!
+1
level 74
Feb 12, 2017
Please accept "the knowledge of good and evil".
+2
level 50
Feb 12, 2017
Really shouldn't have fictitious bits like the Adam and Eve in a quiz about historical blunders.
+2
level 38
Jul 12, 2017
How interesting that you consider the biblical story of Adam and Eve fictional, but do not question the authenticity of Homer's Iliad. Interesting indeed!
+1
level 61
Sep 12, 2019
Cause that one doesn't have flying monkeys in them... ow wait, wrong story.
+1
level 60
Feb 12, 2017
Surprised Columbus wasn't on the quiz. His "discoveries" ended up killing up to a hundred million people, and many wars were fought over the Americas as well.
+1
level 38
Mar 28, 2017
I'm still befuddled as to how one can "discover" something which was already there. Not only did Columbus not "discover" America, he didn't even know where he was, as for years we were stuck with the misnomer "West Indies" because of him. What was he good at? Oh, yes random assassinations and murder.
+1
level 53
Sep 6, 2017
So, how can you discover anything "which WASN'T there"? He truly discovered something completely unknown for the europeans, at most perhaps hypothetized... Maybe you can argue that, since he refused to admit that he didn't make to India, he couldn't be the real pioneer, but even that would be too forced...
+1
level 43
May 27, 2017
Please accept Armarda/Amarda for Spanish Amada, it's such an easy mistake!
+1
level 76
Sep 6, 2017
Picky point, but the "Bush" question should reference George W. Bush, since the name without the middle initial generally refers to his father, George H. W. Bush.
+2
level 54
Feb 25, 2018
Nixon didn't plan the Watergate break in. He knew nothing about it. After the fact, he tried to hide the facts about it.
+2
level 70
Apr 14, 2018
Nixon didn't know about Watergate. That's funny!
+2
level 65
May 25, 2018
LOL stop denying history bud
+3
level 49
Feb 25, 2018
To the skeptics: George Washington did chop down a tree. Not the cherry tree, but the tree of knowledge. Adam hired George to do the dirty work, then blamed Eve. What a prick. So he got evicted and took Eve with him. Washington showed up later.
+1
level 38
Feb 25, 2018
I believe that it was The Tree of Life that Washington chopped down. The Tree Of Knowledge is still there, being zealously guarded by Socrates and Plato!
+1
level 62
Feb 25, 2018
There is absolutely no proof of an "Adam" or "Eve" or that anyone ate anything. Everything else listed here actually happened.
+1
level 77
Jun 27, 2018
The Trojan horse story is highly doubtful. But, yes, Adam and Eve is demonstrably fiction, so that's in a different category.
+1
level 49
Feb 26, 2018
My take on this is if you are attacking Russia or being attacked by them a blunder is coming.
+1
level 82
Jun 14, 2018
Great quiz 15/18. Thank you.
+2
level 63
Jun 27, 2018
The Bible is myth, not history. Get that off the list. And before anyone mentions it, no, I don't think the Trojan War should be on here either.
+1
level 38
Jun 27, 2018
^ To each his own. Also, the Ottoman Empire, was just one country?
+1
level 68
Aug 3, 2018
I would argue that the blunder at Gettysburg was committed by Robert E. Lee rather than Pickett. The plan was Lee's, and he's the one who insisted on going forward with it even over General Longstreet's objection. Pickett is just the one to whom it fell to try and make the bad plan work.
+1
level 68
Aug 6, 2018
The question on annexation by Germany in 1938 needs to be changed to include Austria. Parts of Austria were also annexed by Germany in March of 1938 and since this was the only annexation I was aware of I didn't have any other alternatives. Please amend. Source: https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/germany-annexes-austria
+1
level 53
Feb 19, 2019
If I've learned anything in school so far it's that people should never invade Russia in the winter, never invade Russia any other time of the year, and to never buy discount coleslaw. 2 of these 3 helped me.
+1
level 77
Jul 20, 2019
You bought some fancy coleslaw and invaded Russia in the spring time?
+2
level 31
Mar 13, 2019
The final question is incorrect, the tree's full name is "The tree of the knowledge of good and evil" not simply "The tree of knowledge". Vastly different meaning!
+1
level 77
Jul 20, 2019
ultimately the same thing, though, and the Church (and temples that preceded it) has been teaching that ignorance is a virtue, the "armor of faith," and seeking knowledge is a sin for millennia.
+1
level 60
Sep 12, 2019
That is most definitely not what they teach. If that's what you think, you haven't studied this for more than two seconds
+1
level 77
Sep 13, 2019
Or... I have studied it for 40 years.
+1
level 60
Sep 12, 2019
The Crusades? A blunder?
+1
level 77
Sep 13, 2019
yeah. silly politically motivated historical revisionism.
+1
level 79
Sep 13, 2019
The break-in was not at the Watergate Hotel; it was at the Watergate Office Building. (The Watergate complex consists of the office building, the hotel, and condos.)
+1
level 77
Sep 13, 2019
There's also a CVS where you can get passport photos taken, and a coffee stand and a pastry store. Convenient when making visa runs to the Saudi Arabian embassy right across the street.
+1
level 44
Sep 13, 2019
Please accept Czechia or Czech Republic for Czechoslovakia