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Theatre Terminology

Based on the definition, can you name the theatre-related terms?
Quiz by Rachel24601
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Last updated: May 26, 2012
First submittedMay 26, 2012
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Answer
A flat surface or curtain used to represent a setting
backdrop
The reason a character does something
motivation
A speech in which an actor, usually alone, thinks aloud
soliloquy
A rolling cart used to change scenery
jackknife
When an actor, whose character is dead, moves onstage
corpsing
A person who feeds actors forgotten lines during rehearsals
prompter
A rhetorical device in which the audience knows something that the characters do not
dramatic irony
A gradual dimming of the stage lights
fade
The lowered part of the theatre where the orchestra sits
pit
The seating area of a theatre
house
A platform raised above the primary level of the stage
rostrum
Hint
Answer
Passages of speech between characters
dialogue
A structure used to reduce the opening between the stage and the wings
proscenium
The spoken part of a musical play
libretto
Tape or marking on the stage to indicate placement of set pieces
spike marks
A form of acting in which performers make up their own lines and scenarios
improvisation
A narrow walkway from which scenery and drops are flown
catwalk
Chief electrician in charge of lighting
gaffer
Appearance of truth; suspension of audience's disbelief
verisimilitude
A door in the stage floor for actor to enter or exit
trap
Program or booklet containing information about the performance
playbill
A secondary actor who fills in when an actor is unable to perform
understudy
+1
level 45
Oct 2, 2012
Corpsing has absolutely zero to do with dead characters; it means the actor laughs on stage!
+1
level 51
Apr 17, 2014
agreed. And is playbill still used? In the UK that would be a programme.
+1
level 72
Jul 29, 2014
Can you accept "prompt"? That's what I've always heard the prompter known as.
+1
level 32
Nov 27, 2014
Motive(s) is a reasonable substitute for motivation, no?
+1
level 47
Jul 22, 2016
Is Rachel24601 British, perhaps? Never heard of "corpsing" in the U.S. And "a rolling cart used to move scenery" is a "wagon". Never heard "jackknife" before. A the proscenium is fixed. So if anything can "reduce the opening between the stage and the wings" it is "legs". And "rostrum" is not really used in theatre here. It refers to a dais. In American stagecraft a raised platform is simply called a platform.