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CLEP English Literature Quotes

Given a quote, guess either the author or the title of the work (your choice). If you're studying for CLEP/AP try going through it twice, once guessing authors and once guessing titles.
Quiz by andiemoon
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Last updated: January 14, 2017
First submittedJanuary 14, 2017
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Year
Quote
Type
Author or Title
1478
Whan that Aprille with his shoures soote, The droghte of March hath perced to the roote, And bathed every veyne in swich licóur Of which vertú engendred is the flour
Verse (collection of stories)
Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales
1590
But on his breast a bloudie Crosse he bore, The deare remembrance of his dying Lord
Epic Poem
Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene
1599
The quality of mercy is not strain'd, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Drama
William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice
1599
Come live with me and be my love, And we will all the pleasures prove, That Valleys, groves, hills, and fields, Woods, or steepy mountain yields.
Poem
Christopher Marlowe, The Passionate Shepherd to His Love
1603
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause
Drama
William Shakespeare, Hamlet
1604
Was this the face that launched a thousand ships / And burnt the topless towers of Ilium?
Drama
Christopher Marlowe, Dr. Faustus
1612
Ambition is like choler; which is an humor that maketh men active, earnest, full of alacrity, and stirring, if it be not stopped.
Essay
Francis Bacon, Of Ambition
1633
Death be not proud, though some have called thee, mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so
Poem
John Donne, Sonnet X (Death Be Not Proud)
1633
For God's sake hold your tongue, and let me love, Or chide my palsy, or my gout
Poem
John Donne, The Canonization
c. 1650
For Fate with jealous eye does see Two perfect loves, nor lets them close; Their union would her ruin be, And her tyrannic pow’r depose.
Poem
Andrew Marvell, The Definition of Love
1667
Of man's first disobedience, and the fruit of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste brought death into the world
Poem (epic)
John Milton, Paradise Lost
1712
What dire offence from amorous causes springs, what mighty contests rise from trivial things
Poem
Alexander Pope, The Rape of the Lock
1719
I was exceedingly surprised, with the print of a man's naked foot on the shore, which was very plain to be seen in the sand.
Novel
Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe
1726
My Reconcilement to the Yahoo-kind in general might not be so difficult, if [...]
Satire
Jonathan Swift, Gulliver's Travels
1734
Know then thyself, presume not God to scan, The proper study of mankind is Man
Poem
Alexander Pope, An Essay on Man
1750
"The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea" "[...] (There they alike in trembling hope repose) The bosom of his Father and his God."
Poem (Elegy)
Thomas Gray, Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard
1794
[...] In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry?
Poem
William Blake, The Tyger
1814
And all that’s best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes; Thus mellowed to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies.
Poem
Lord Byron, She Walks in Beauty
1816
"In Xanadu did [...]" "And close your eyes with holy dread For he on honey-dew hath fed, And drunk the milk of Paradise."
Poem
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Kubla Khan
1818
A THING of beauty is a joy for ever: Its loveliness increases;
Poem
John Keats, Endymion
1818
I met a traveller from an antique land, Who said—“Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert [...]"
Poem
Percy Bysshe Shelley, Ozymandias
1820
"Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness, Thou foster-child of silence and slow time" "[...] Beauty is truth, truth beauty,—that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know."
Poem (Ode)
John Keats, Ode on a Grecian Urn
1820
O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn's being, Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead
Poem (Ode)
Percy Bysshe Shelley, Ode to the West Wind
1843
[violent feelings] produce in us a falseness in all our impressions of external things, which I would generally characterize as the 'Pathetic Fallacy'
Art Criticism
John Ruskin, Modern Painters
1850
[...] leaned out From the gold bar of Heaven; Her eyes were deeper than the depth Of waters stilled at even;" " [...] And laid her face between her hands And wept, (I heard her tears)"
Poem
Dante Gabriel Rossetti, The Blessed Damozel
c. 1855
One face looks out from all his canvasses, One selfsame figure sits or walks or leans; We found her hidden just behind those screens, That mirror gave back all her loveliness.
Poem
Christina Rossetti, In an Artist’s Studio
1855
Wandering between two worlds, one dead The other powerless to be born, With nowhere yet to rest my head Like these, on earth I wait forlorn.
Poem
Matthew Arnold, Stanzas from the Grande Chartreuse
1888
I am the master of my fate; I am the captain of my soul.
Poem
William Earnest Henley, Invictus
1920
Let us go then you and I, when the evening is spread out against the sky, like a patient etherized upon a table
Poem
T. S. Eliot, The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock
1922
APRIL is the cruellest month, breeding Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing Memory and desire, stirring Dull roots with spring rain.
Poem
T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land
1928
That is no country for old men. The young In one another's arms, birds in the trees, —Those dying generations—at their song
Poem
W. B. Yeats, Sailing to Byzantium
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