Analogies #10

Can you fill in the blanks to complete these analogies?
Some questions from Jacktheguy and SirStumptown
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: December 22, 2020
First submittedAugust 26, 2017
Times taken10,185
Rating3.79
6:00
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This is to this ...
As ...
Pebble is to Stone
Rock is to Boulder
PBS is to US
BBC is to UK
Ciao is to Italian
Aloha is to Hawaiian
Scarlett O'Hara is to
Margaret Mitchell
Hermione Granger is to
J.K. Rowling
Dick is to Detective
Spook is to Spy
Pride is to Prejudice
Sense is to Sensibility
> is to Diminuendo
< is to Crescendo
June is to Solstice
March is to Equinox
Prosecco is to Italy
Champagne is to France
H1N1 is to Swine
H5N1 is to Bird
This is to this ...
As ...
♂ is to Testosterone
♀ is to Estrogen
Red Cross is to Christianity
Red Crescent is to Islam
Fructose is to Fruit
Lactose is to Milk
Ranch is to United States
Station is to Australia
6 is to Million
12 is to Trillion
Gandalf is to Magneto
Han Solo is to Indiana Jones
M. Night Shyamalan is to
Plot Twist
Michael Bay is to Explosion
MTWTFSS is to Day
MVEMJSUN is to Planet
Army is to Navy
General is to Admiral
Water is to Ice
Carbon Dioxide is to Dry Ice
+3
Level 81
Aug 26, 2017
To accomodate UK usage and spelling both "oestrogen" and "billion" should also be accepted.
+4
Level ∞
Aug 26, 2017
Oestrogen will work now but long scale numbers are no longer current in the UK.
+5
Level 74
Aug 27, 2017
No longer in the UK as you say, but many countries still use the long-scale form - see this map for the usage of each.
+4
Level 80
Dec 4, 2017
Since when does Canada use both scales? I have never heard a Canadian say "thousand million", but hey, I've only lived here my entire life.
+2
Level 71
Dec 4, 2017
Well technically they would say "a millard" for a thousand million.
+3
Level 71
Dec 4, 2017
And according to the wikipedia article Jerry gave, French Canadians are the ones who are using the long scale.
+2
Level 82
Dec 4, 2017
Indeed. As far as I know, the long scale is the only one used in French.
+1
Level 37
Dec 4, 2017
I think that the countries that have a problem with these two scales are the ones that speak Portuguese, Brazil and Portugal for starters use different scales...
+2
Level 48
Dec 4, 2017
long scale makes so much more sense
+2
Level 74
Dec 4, 2017
6 is to million as 12 is to two million makes more sense, in my opinion. But I guess we're doing analogies, no math.
+4
Level 64
Dec 5, 2017
@Tomtrific: It's about the number of zeroes that follow the one in the corresponding number.
+1
Level 72
Oct 28, 2019
Quizmaster, this is highly controversial. Never heard of the term "long scale" before but as SenileS says, it makes much more sense. I don't agree that billion for Million squared is no longer current in UK. I'm British and I use it - so that proves you wrong, n'est-ce pas? Some years ago the BBC decided that they would switch to the American system (traitors!) but since when have they authority to alter the meanings of words in my language? Please accept billion as a valid answer to the question.
+3
Level ∞
Oct 28, 2019
It wasn't just the BBC. The government of the UK adopted the short scale for all official uses in 1974.
+1
Level 71
Dec 23, 2020
Not to even mention the "billion+" Indians, Pakistanis etc. who use lakh and crore (lakh=100k, crore=10M, so 1 lakh crore = 1 trillion, short scale).
+1
Level 74
Aug 27, 2017
Very interesting quiz, and I learned about Italian champagne today.
+1
Level 64
Aug 28, 2017
I wouldn't call it "Italian champagne". Though it's very much like Champagne, Champagne can only be named so if it's from specific French regions while Prosecco can only be named so if it's from specific Italian regions.
+1
Level 82
Dec 28, 2020
Apart from California Champagne - due to the USA's non-ratification of the Treaty of Versailles, apparently.
+7
Level 80
Oct 16, 2017
Station? That's it? Australia has such colorful terminology and nicknames. But station??? Very disappointed.
+8
Level 81
Dec 4, 2017
Yeah I thought it was going to be a woollerycricker or something like that.
+1
Level 70
Dec 4, 2017
That's what we call the Railway Station!
+1
Level 51
Aug 14, 2018
We call the railway station the Traino
+2
Level 73
Mar 2, 2018
It's not really in common usage now - more in the squatter era pre-federation (1901). Most people would say Property or Farm now
+1
Level 74
Dec 22, 2020
Of course it is still in use today, it's just that there are less and less small ones as the big ones gobble them up and get even bigger.
+5
Level 66
Dec 4, 2017
Two Million should be accepted :p.
+2
Level 81
Dec 4, 2017
The best relationship between 1 million and 6 that you could come up with is "1 million divided by 166666.666667 almost equals 6?"
+2
Level 74
Dec 4, 2017
I don't understand that question at all. Holocaust deaths to US debt in 2002?
+1
Level 81
Dec 4, 2017
Million has 6 zeroes
+1
Level 67
Dec 4, 2017
How many zeroes in the number. It took me a bit to figure out what they were asking for.
+1
Level 60
Dec 4, 2017
Great quiz. One of your best for a while. Cheers
+1
Level 59
Dec 4, 2017
I was trying to figure out how the 6 Million Dollar Man, related to a TV or movie title with 12... "12 Monkeys" "12 Angry Men" "12 Years a Slave"
+6
Level 70
Mar 5, 2019
I kept trying vegemite for australia... think I had the wrong ranch
+1
Level 78
Jun 26, 2020
You were not alone!
+2
Level 74
Dec 21, 2020
Finally an Australian-centric clue! I was one of the 17% who got this one, easy.
+3
Level 74
Dec 21, 2020
My geology lecturer would have lost his mind if I'd suggested your Rock / Boulder analogy. The scientific terms are cobble / boulder (both of which are differently sized rocks). We were taught to avoid non-scientific lay terms such as pebble, stone, etc. under threat of failure if we ever used them! Takes me back to my days at uni...
+2
Level 80
Dec 22, 2020
This is way harder than the first nine. I've never even seen the word diminuendo before. Or Prosecco. Had no idea that a ranch is called a "station" in Australia. I still got 17, but almost all of them were harder than any of the previous nine quizzes, all of which I've taken within the last 24 hours.
+1
Level 79
Dec 22, 2020
It might be worth accepting galactose for the sugar one, since it's a monosaccharide (like fructose but unlike lactose). Of course, anyone who knows what galactose is will go for lactose when that doesn't work, so it's unlikely to matter.
+5
Level 84
Dec 22, 2020
Restore the P in MVEMJSUNP! :)
+2
Level 72
Dec 23, 2020
To quote Jon Stewart, My Very Excellent Mother Just Said, "Uh-oh, No Pluto."
+1
Level 78
Dec 22, 2020
Ironically the name of Prosecco village is originally Slovenian.
+1
Level 78
Mar 21, 2021
The Italians took a lot of Slovene land after WWI, including the city of Trieste.
+4
Level 77
Dec 22, 2020
Army is to Navy as General is to Admiral

Not an analogy - close though. The relationship between the two sets don't match.

Army is to General as Navy is to Admiral (top rank of the the service) would be one way to make it correct.

+2
Level 70
Dec 23, 2020
damn i thought prosecco was a cheese
+2
Level 84
Dec 26, 2020
Tougher than the others for sure, but fun. However, the Gandalf/Magneto/HanSolo one makes no sense to me. It was clear that of the first two, it was the same actor playing both, but there's no real relationship between those characters other than the actor. If that's all it is, then technically the answer could be any other role that was played by Harrison Ford, which really isn't an analogy in my view. I did eventually get it after guessing a few, but this one isn't up to the same standard as the other questions.
+1
Level 85
Dec 28, 2020
This was one of mine that was borrowed from my Movie Analogies quiz, which admittedly I haven't updated in a while and probably should if I ever get around to it.

Anyway, the analogy here is the most well-known characters that have been played by the same actor. Ian McKellen's best known roles are Gandalf and Magneto, and Harrison Ford's best known roles are Han Solo and Indiana Jones. Hope that clears things up.

+2
Level 82
Dec 28, 2020
Their "best-known roles" surely depend on who you ask. I've never seen McKellen as Magneto, but I remember his Richard III.
+1
Level 85
Dec 28, 2020
Well then yours might be a special case. I highly doubt more people remember Ian McKellen as Richard III more than as Magneto.