Cities Founded by the French in North America

Can you name the six most populous cities in North America that were originally founded as French settlements?
By city proper population
Quiz by Quizmaster
Rate:
Last updated: September 29, 2018
First submittedJune 7, 2017
Times taken19,175
Rating4.44
2:30
Enter answer here
0
 / 6 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Population
City
1,705,000
Montreal
987,000
Port-au-Prince
670,000
Detroit
532,000
Quebec
390,000
New Orleans
301,000
Saint Louis
+13
Level ∞
Jun 7, 2017
The next biggest ones: Cap-Haïtien, Baton Rouge, Windsor, Mobile, Trois-Rivières, Kingston (Ontario), and Green Bay.
+2
Level 72
Jun 8, 2017
Not Des Moines? I would have thought Des Moines over Green Bay
+1
Level ∞
Jun 8, 2017
I don't think Des Moines was founded by the French.
+5
Level 71
Sep 16, 2017
With a name like Des Moines it HAS to be founded by the French. 'Of the monks' - it is meaningless in any other language!
+18
Level 65
Sep 16, 2017
No, it says that Des Moines was incorporated in 1846, long after the French left. It was an Indian fort named after the river, which was coincidentally named by the French).
+1
Level 88
Aug 28, 2020
@markasol, Boise is a french word meaning trees, or woods. There was a Frenchman involved in the naming of the town, but it wasn't founded by the French.
+2
Level 75
Sep 16, 2017
I thought for sure Windsor would make the list.
+1
Level 65
Sep 19, 2017
Windsor is named after the British Royal family's name.
+1
Level 58
Sep 18, 2017
Tried Baton Rouge, Mobile, and Green Bay! Got them all in the end though. Great quiz
+1
Level 44
Aug 6, 2018
I grew up in Kingston, Ontario- there's still a little piece of the original French fort's wall to ogle at! But for the most part, the city's heritage is English/British Isles. By the 19th century, the French influence that founded the place was all but gone. All the other old landmarks we have are from the British-ruled days (ESPECIALLY Fort Henry. That one's indisputably British. Had a summer job as an interpreter there... red coats, "British grenadiers" for our march, "Built by the British empire after the war of 1812". etc.)
+2
Level 51
Jul 14, 2020
Being someone who used to live in the Iowa City area, I find the geography there to be relatively intuitive; Iowa City and Iowa Falls are on the Iowa River, which also happens to flow through Iowa County, Cedar Rapids and Cedar Falls are on the Cedar River, which happens to flow through Cedar County, Des Moines is on the Des Moines River, Sioux City is located at the confluence of the Missouri and the Big Sioux River, and the town Clear Lake is located conveniently next to... surprise surprise, Clear Lake.
+1
Level 73
Jul 14, 2020
I wonder what source you're using. The first Québec (province) city mentioned in your list is Trois-Rivières. Yet, Wikipedia lists 6 others before it (Laval [which should appear in the quiz], Gatineau, Longueuil, Sherbrooke, Saguenay and Lévis)...
+1
Level 73
Jul 14, 2020
And now, I just read a comment lower which might answer that issue. ("Laval has not been founded by the French (from France), but by French-canadians... Probably why it's not on that list.")
+1
Level 57
Jun 9, 2017
Quebec is not a city
+15
Level 65
Jun 9, 2017
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quebec_City

Quebec City is a city in the province of Quebec and is the provincial capital as well. It is the 7th largest city in Canada.

+5
Level 71
Jun 13, 2017
As a Quebecer, I can confirm there is indeed a city called Quebec in the province of the same name in Canada. It's the provincial capital and they have a fantastic winter festival, which I attended for the first time last February. Amazing restaurants and museums too ;)
+1
Level 65
Sep 16, 2017
You forgot to mention the Citadel and the Chateau Frontenac!
+1
Level 41
Sep 16, 2017
Is that the noun you use? Quebecer? I hadn't heard that before.
+3
Level 69
Sep 17, 2017
Yes Quebecer is correct. Québécois/e in French. Québec is beautiful, peaceful, active and the cradle of French civilization in North America. Also a great place for alternative, progressive or hard rock and metal. Ask Metallica. For a mix of the band + Québec city, take a look : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rFZpZ2QPyw
+2
Level 44
Aug 6, 2018
My Dad was born in Quebec city! We're not a Quebecois family, but Grandpa was stationed there in the army when Dad came along...
+2
Level 73
Jul 14, 2020
@cshtthomas So that means since New York is a state, New York City does not exist? Interesting.
+1
Level 85
Jun 12, 2017
Source? I'm curious to see what other cities are on the list, even if they're smaller populations than the cutoff.
+1
Level ∞
Jun 20, 2017
Original research by looking at a list of biggest cities in the United States, Canada, and Haiti and then referencing Wikipedia.
+3
Level 78
Jul 18, 2017
when did Haiti become a part of North America? it is a Caribbean island nation not part of a continental mass. otherwise great idea for a quiz!
+10
Level 66
Aug 23, 2017
Found the nitpicker. Technically Haiti is not part of a single landmass, but it is still a part of North America in the American Continent.
+2
Level 78
Sep 16, 2017
There is no "American Continent". There is the continent of North America and the continent of South America. When I was in school the islands weren't considered part of any continent and some sources still say that, but on this site they are included as part of the North American continent. (So is Hawaii, but the reason is politically, not geographically.)
+19
Level 81
Sep 16, 2017
Continents traditionally include islands. Do you believe that Japan is not in Asia? That the UK is not in Europe? That Madagascar is not part of Africa?
+2
Level 78
Jul 14, 2020
There are still some sources which say the Caribbean islands are not part of North America or any other continent - even Wikipedia doesn't seem 100% certain whether to call them part of the continent or their own region. I wasn't referring to any other islands in my comment, and Japan was included with Asia even back in the Dark Ages when I was in school. We were also taught that Central America wasn't part of either North or South America but was its own region, as were many areas in the world. I think there are reasons to support either point of view but currently the winning argument classifies every country in the world as part of some continent either politically or geographically, no matter how far separated.
+2
Level 79
Oct 16, 2017
Australia is not part of Australia, 'cuz Australia is an island.
+6
Level 77
Aug 16, 2017
Nice quiz but if you use city proper population, you forgot Laval, which is over 400,000
+1
Level 66
Aug 23, 2017
+1
+1
Level 73
Sep 18, 2017
+2

Also, more recent data seems to give slightly higher numbers for Montréal and Québec at 1,942,042 and 585,485.

(https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_municipalit%C3%A9s_du_Qu%C3%A9bec_par_population)

+2
Level 50
Sep 16, 2017
What about Laval? Or is it considered part of Montreal?
+1
Level 73
Sep 16, 2017
It says city proper. Which puts Laval in the middle of this list.
+3
Level 44
May 17, 2018
Laval has not been founded by the French (from France), but by French-canadians...

Probably why it's not on that list.

+4
Level 81
Sep 16, 2017
Surprised I got all six with my first six tries.
+1
Level 50
Jul 15, 2020
Exact same surprise here. I don't know how much it helped being Louisiana Cajun.
+2
Level 67
Apr 5, 2018
Oh, North America! I thought it was US only. >_<
+1
Level 73
Mar 19, 2019
I thought that Louisville would be somewhere on this list. I now know that I am wrong. It turns out that it was named for King Louis by Americans in recognition of the French role in the American revolution, not by the French themselves.
+1
Level 70
Jul 14, 2020
"originally founded" is a tricky phrase, but you could make an argument for Winnipeg as well. It certainly wasn't founded, in any sense, by the French crown, but the Red River Settlement (which became Winnipeg) was about 80% French-speaking Metis in 1870 (the year in which Manitoba became a province - at that time a small "postage stamp" surrounding Winnipeg). So, not the French crown, but a "French settlement"? Its city proper population would put it third on this list.
+1
Level 68
Jul 14, 2020
I was focused on Canada and the United States and so forgot about Haiti...
+1
Level 64
Jul 14, 2020
Ditto.
+1
Level 50
Jul 14, 2020
Only 21% got Port-au-Prince?
+1
Level 57
Jul 14, 2020
It's focus, people focus to much on USA and Canada
+1
Level 70
Jul 15, 2020
To be fair, nobody in Haiti (or the rest of the Caribbean) would say they were from North America.
+1
Level 47
Jul 14, 2020
Great quiz! I missed St. Louis, ...and I live there!
+2
Level 73
Jul 14, 2020
We're fighting so hard to keep on speaking French up here. Would you please consider putting the accents on Montréal and Québec? Pretty please?
+1
Level 65
Jan 14, 2021
I got most of these very quickly and then I was stumped. It took a lightbulb moment for the most southerly answer.