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Homophones #1

For each word, guess (and correctly spell) its homophone.
A homophone is a word that sounds the same but is spelled differently
Quiz idea: AVR
Last updated: March 18, 2018
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Word
Homophone
Days
Daze
Waste
Waist
Pause
Paws
Him
Hymn
Profit
Prophet
Slay
Sleigh
Links
Lynx
Patients
Patience
Step
Steppe
Word
Homophone
Ate
Eight
Seen
Scene
Peer
Pier
Council
Counsel
Beau
Bow
Plum
Plumb
Faze
Phase
Time
Thyme
Cast
Caste
Word
Homophone
Spade
Spayed
Gate
Gait
Ward
Warred
Rye
Wry
Earn
Urn
Cereal
Serial
Brews
Bruise
Ducked
Duct
Manner
Manor
+4
level 20
Mar 20, 2013
Sad. I made 2 homophone quizzes ages ago :I! I guess mine is different to this one, as I give the meaning of both words that are homophones rather than giving one pair of homophone.
+4
level 31
Mar 20, 2013
what about pores? as in the tiny tiny dimples on your face?
+2
level 56
Mar 20, 2013
Good idea
+3
level 58
Sep 8, 2015
No. There is a distinct "r" sound in pores. A homophone is something that sounds exactly the same, not something that sounds similar.
+4
level 55
Jun 27, 2018
They all sound the same in pretty much all of England. The difference if there is any is in the vowel, not the pronunciation of the 'R'.
+3
level 75
Jun 27, 2018
Yet, I hear you add a distinctive "r" sound to words that end in "w". We pronounce raw as "rah" while when I hear some Brits say it, it becomes "rawr". There are regions in the US where paws and pores is pronounced the same, too. We have over 20 distinctive areas of accents in the US. Some of us say lah-yer, some same loy-er for lawyer. Some say doller for dollar, some say dollah, etc. We often have different words for the same thing, too - crawdad, crawfish, and crayfish are the same critter. I don't think any one is right and the others are wrong, it's just some of our differences to celebrate.
+1
level 55
Aug 17, 2018
I think this is a difference in the vowel sound rather than adding any consonant at the end. I agree the words sound different, but the way I pronounce 'raw', the sound at the beginning is not the same as the sound at the end. I know there are lots of different areas of accents, in fact I would be very surprised if there were only 20 in the USA! In Britain, accents are supposed to change noticeably every 20 miles. For example, a Manchester and a Liverpool accent are distinguishable. There are some parts of England where these words would be pronounced differently, for example in Cornwall (I think). However, mostly they are pronounced the same.
+1
level 55
Jun 27, 2018
Anywhere where the "r" is pronounced in "pores," they sound different. I believe the problem is accents. I personally pronounce it phonetically which I'm pretty sure is the official pronunciation, but I see where you're coming from.
+3
level 46
Jun 28, 2018
There is an official accent?
+2
level 67
Jun 29, 2018
Everybody's accent is the "Official Accent"....... especially mine.
+2
level 55
Aug 17, 2018
There are some accents that have had phonetic dictionaries written for them and are used in some official contexts. However "the official pronunciation" definitely isn't a thing. You could say it was correct in the General American accent. The corresponding accent in the UK is Received Pronunciation. However in the case of RP, the accent is so old that now practically nobody speaks with it. Even the Queen's accent has changed away from traditional RP.
+1
level 82
Mar 20, 2013
Fun quiz, wry took me a couple minutes.
+5
level 60
Mar 20, 2013
what about pear or pare for peer?
+3
level 53
Jun 10, 2014
You pronounce "peer" with a long "a" sound? I think most of us use a long "e".
+5
level 53
Jan 8, 2017
absolutely i pronounce peer and pear and pare the same. tried both of these. kiwi 'accent' i guess
+2
level 74
Jun 27, 2018
Kiwi hear, what long 'a' sound? Any "-air", "-eer", or "-ear" word sounds the same to me.
+1
level 55
Jun 27, 2018
Don't really know what you mean by long 'a' and long 'e' but I would pronounce them very differently. Do the words 'air' and 'ear' sound the same to you? If not that is the difference (from the perspective of a British speaker). If so, maybe look it up? Though I could imagine them being pronounced the same in a Kiwi/Australian accent.
+1
level 60
Jun 28, 2018
GreenFriday So you pronounce hair and here the same? Otherwise peer and here should rhyme while hair and pair should rhyme, but not both sets.
+1
level 48
Mar 20, 2013
Always thought steppe was pronounced steep, not step?
+2
level 56
Mar 20, 2013
What about manna/mana for manner?
+2
level 68
Jun 27, 2018
Works for me too, but with "proper" pronunciation, you should be pronouncing the "r" on manner/manor. Most Brits get rid of -er sounds though and replace it with an "uh" sound.
+1
level 55
Jun 28, 2018
What pronunciation do you consider to be the "proper" one?
+1
level 20
Mar 20, 2013
Great quiz. Got stuck on a few, but really fun! 19/27
+1
level 20
May 3, 2013
5/3/13, 100% with 2:07 to go! School has improved me... :)
+1
level 58
Mar 20, 2013
Love this. Reminds me of a homonym quiz in 5th grade. Got hung up on him/hymn way back then but got all of them today with 2:52 remaining.
+4
level 55
Mar 20, 2013
Do Pair and Pear not work for Peer?
+1
level 35
Mar 21, 2013
What about "hem" for him.
+1
level 22
Mar 21, 2013
gosh dang it lol
+1
level 37
Mar 23, 2013
Great quiz, but I really loved reading the comments! So many great dialects from all over the world.
+1
level 35
Mar 24, 2013
Interesting quiz!!
+1
level 58
Mar 14, 2014
The only one I thought that had me was cereal. I though surreal. Could that be accepted? Not exact but it's close, and once I had that I couldn't think of anything else.
+5
level 77
Sep 8, 2015
Only if you're Charles Barkley.
+1
level 58
Nov 18, 2015
LOL
+2
level 71
Aug 2, 2014
Cast/Karst (a geography term I learned at high school). Also please accept Speyed, which is how it is spelled outside of North America.
+1
level 62
Mar 8, 2016
Here in Australia, we spell it Spayed, as in what one might do to dogs and cats, etc
+2
level 63
Jun 27, 2018
Agreed, the spelling is typically 'speyed' in the UK.
+1
level 55
Jun 27, 2018
Accents once again complicate things. Karst is supposed to be pronounced carst, not cahst.
+1
level 65
Jun 27, 2018
Karst is pronounced the same as cast in my country.
+1
level 75
Feb 2, 2015
What about erne for earn? Or is that my southern accent showing again? (And my love of crossword puzzles.)
+1
level 40
Mar 23, 2015
I know hymn is a homophone for him, but hem should work as well.
+3
level 55
Jun 27, 2018
"Him" is pronounced with an "I." "Hem" is pronounced with an "E."
+1
level 45
Sep 8, 2015
"Cast" and "karst" should work - they sound identical in both South African and British dialects
+1
level 75
Sep 8, 2015
In US English, we pronounce the "r" in karst, except perhaps in New England, where that letter gets little or no respect.
+1
level 68
Aug 20, 2016
I'm British and slightly pronounce the R in Karst, at least to the point of making the word more drawn out.
+1
level 55
Jun 27, 2018
Possibly a Northern English accent? I don't know the word 'karst' but I think I would pronounce them the same. It's like 'past'- in the South of England it is pronounced very differently to in the North.
+2
level 74
Sep 8, 2015
Accept fays for faze as well please.
+1
level 68
Dec 14, 2016
I agree. Fays has several definitions and is pronounced the same as faze.
+2
level 47
Sep 8, 2015
Not so intuitive with my Scottish accent! Particularly "earn" and "urn"! Very fun quiz though.
+1
level 59
Sep 8, 2015
"Ward" was so difficult for me! I spent at least a minute on it! I thought of "whirred" though...anyone else? "Warred" just wasn't an obvious answer at first.
+1
level 69
Jun 27, 2018
In some places in the South and Midwest, "wired" would be accurate.
+1
level 75
Jun 27, 2018
Yep, as in, "They finally got their cabin "warred" for electricity." Far and fire are the same in those areas, too. I heard those a lot when I was growing up, but not so much now. We are becoming more homogenized in our speech.
+2
level 54
Sep 9, 2015
Good quiz, but I agree with the addition of "manna" as in "manna from heaven" as a match for "manner". "Mana" doesn't work though; it's a Maori word which has a longer first vowel sound.
+1
level 59
Oct 10, 2015
Fun quiz. Talking to myself even more than usual! Although I still couldn't get caste. Another quiz like this please!
+1
level 48
Feb 7, 2016
Vedas on the Caste. That system was so....caste.
+1
level 63
Apr 1, 2016
Him......what about hem. As in hem used to even out your pants. Hem clothing.
+2
level 59
Jun 27, 2018
Him and hem don't sound the same in New Zealand.
+1
level 46
Jan 21, 2019
hem rhymes with gem
+1
level 28
Apr 23, 2016
unfair 'Beau' is french
+3
level 22
Apr 23, 2016
I thought homophones were made by Apple.
+1
level 34
May 26, 2016
100% too easy
+1
level 70
Jun 1, 2017
Agreed. Had more than 3 minutes left.
+1
level 42
Jul 21, 2016
Fun quiz. Thanks.
+1
level 68
Dec 14, 2016
Ern and Erne are two acceptable spellings for a sea bird. I've always thought they were pronounced the same as urn/earn. Am I wrong?
+2
level 54
Dec 15, 2016
bow and beau are not even close.
+1
level 80
Mar 18, 2018
Agreed. But apparently the borrowing into English has bastardized the French enough that "beau" sounds just like "bow".
+1
level 73
Mar 18, 2018
a "bow" tie and beau are the same but bow as a verb is completely different.
+1
level 62
Mar 25, 2018
Just realised that some "bow"s are pronounced with an "a" (instead of the original "o"). Further, the weapon can be pronounced eitherway?! That is even more confusing...
+1
level 46
Jan 21, 2019
not quite, with bow your lips (should) form a "w"sound, when other not it is distinctly heard. Usually you hardly hear it, but the lips are still formed that way which makes a slight difference
+2
level 33
Oct 20, 2017
there is also multiple homophones for peer: Pier, pear, pair, pare
+1
level 77
Mar 19, 2018
Yes, no, no, no. :-)
+2
level 49
Oct 20, 2017
Another valid homophone for manner is "manna".
+2
level 76
Mar 19, 2018
Found the New Englander.
+1
level 76
Oct 20, 2017
Shouldn't dais be an acceptable answer?
+1
level 66
Jun 27, 2018
I've only ever heard that pronounced with two syllables, something like "DAY-us" (or /ˈdeɪ.ɪs/, if you want proper phonetic notation.)
+1
level 73
Mar 18, 2018
rye and why?? really? not in southern Ontario.
+1
level 70
Mar 22, 2018
It says wRy, not wHy.
+1
level 38
Jan 21, 2019
I would think rye and wry would be homonyms.
+1
level 46
Jan 21, 2019
Isnt the w in wry pronounced??(forming your lips differently) like you say the first sound in ring and wrought differently (rrr and w-r)
+1
level 78
Mar 18, 2018
Another vote for "erne"/"ern" (seabird)
+1
level 67
Mar 18, 2018
It's always funny to see people argue, then realise that yes, they too have an accent. I have to put on an american accent in my head to get these sometimes.
+1
level 55
Mar 19, 2018
I tried pores before realising it was an American quiz
+1
level 70
Mar 22, 2018
I wish people would look up the IPA/phoenetic spelling before posting their impassioned "but *I* don't have an accent!" argument, but that would, ya know, make actual sense.
+2
level 72
Mar 24, 2018
Patients / Patience - how, where??? Does patient lose T in plural? Or someone invented it in patience?
+1
level 46
Jan 21, 2019
In written form it doesnt lose it, but when spoken, yes the t often gets swallowed/buried/lost
+2
level 59
Apr 15, 2018
For manner, I kept thinking Manna (from Heaven)
+1
level 75
Jun 19, 2018
You're one of those people who adds "r" sounds to the end of any word that ends in a vowel?
+2
level 65
Jun 19, 2018
The opposite is the effect here. While 'intrusive-r' (adding linking 'r's where there is no r) is increasingly a feature of non-rhotic accents, the dialect issue here is the r-dropping unless before a vowel. Outside of rhotic accents, 'manna', 'manor' and 'manner' are all pronounced /ˈmanə/ (cf Oxford English Dictionary). Not an 'r' in sight - all ending in a schwa. To not allow manna requires some sort of note about what accent is being used to justify its exclusion.
+3
level 58
Jun 27, 2018
In other words, they're pronounced incorrectly.
+2
level 58
Jun 27, 2018
@Pharley no, there's a variety of accents in English and none of those described are "incorrect."
+1
level 55
Jun 27, 2018
@kalbahamut, in England they are pronounced identically. But not adding an 'r' sound, just not pronouncing the 'r' in 'manner'. We pronounce them both like @sihollett said.
+1
level 75
Jun 27, 2018
I hear the same thing as Kalbahamut said. Lots of Brits add what sounds like an "r" to words that end in a vowel. For example, your pronunciation of "amnesia" sounds like "amnesier" to our ears - New Englanders do the same thing in the US. It doesn't mean you pronounce them incorrectly, just differently to some of us. I love reading the comments on these type quizzes. I'm always amazed at the differences.
+1
level 55
Jun 28, 2018
Not quite sure what you are referring to but perhaps it is because there is a difference in the pronunciation of the 's' and following vowel? It could also be a 'linking r' - which would only be heard of the following word began with a vowel.
+2
level 65
Jun 28, 2018
They pronounce words much like Mike Myers's character Simon from Saturday Night Live. "Would you like to see my drworrings?" Maybe I'm showing my age.
+1
level 55
Jun 28, 2018
OK I agree that this is an exception to the general rule. But what we were mainly talking about was the endings of words where an 'r' sound may or may not be heard.
+1
level 58
Jun 27, 2018
If earn and urn sound the same, you're pronouncing (at least) one of them wrong.
+3
level 55
Jun 27, 2018
No you're not.
+2
level 66
Jun 27, 2018
Have you got a dictionary with phonetic pronunciation to back that up? Because all the ones I've checked have them pronounced exactly the same. I linked my sources above, but I'll do again here because why not:

Dictionary.com: urn, earn
Merriam-Webster: urn, earn
Oxford: urn, earn
Cambridge: urn, earn
+1
level 69
Jun 27, 2018
As an in-house legal counsel in the US, you would be surprised how many people misspell my title (including the current president, who never gets it right on twitter).
+1
level 38
Jan 21, 2019
Why would you expect him to get it right? Forget his tax returns, I want to see his college transcript.
+1
level 49
Jun 27, 2018
Manna/mana is pronounced the same as manner in all countries except for the USA. Only Americans stress their 'or's and 'er's.
+1
level 75
Jun 27, 2018
It's cute how people outside of the United States believe that their country represents the entire rest of the world. They're invariably wrong, but they speak with such confidence you'd almost be convinced that they knew what they were talking about.
+6
level 55
Jun 27, 2018
It's cute how @kalbahamut believes that @undeadwarrior and maybe a few other people he has met represent the entire rest of the world. He's wrong, but speaks in such a patronising way that you'd almost be convinced he knew what he was talking about.
+1
level 50
Jun 27, 2018
In Ireland manner and manor sound the same, it certainly does not sound the same as manna. No issue with any of the above homophones.
+1
level 3
Jun 27, 2018
i did not get the two.
+1
level 67
Jun 27, 2018
Isn't "sin" a homophone of "seen"?
+3
level 55
Jun 28, 2018
Not sure what accent you speak with but I would certainly pronounce seen with a longer 'ee' sound than the shorter 'i' sound in sin.
+1
level 65
Jun 27, 2018
Karst should be accepted
+1
level 65
Jun 28, 2018
It would be fun to have a series of quizzes that focuses on homophones in specified accents from around the world. This comment section can provide a healthy start.
+1
level 66
Jun 28, 2018
Same as above. Hem for him. General American accent. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonological_change#Merger
+1
level 38
Jun 28, 2018
what about earn = ern or erne, which is a seabird
+1
level 22
Jun 29, 2018
I'm the biggest failure at this... my mind was dying, and I literally got four. ._.
+1
level 46
Jan 21, 2019
Has it revived?
+1
level 74
Sep 27, 2018
Great quiz, got all with 3:00 to spare. Please consider accepting 'fays' for faze.
+1
level 67
Jan 21, 2019
3:42 because of a typo....
+1
level 26
Jan 21, 2019
English isn't my first language and this was surprisingly hard! Only got 8 and missed some obvious ones like patience and scene
+1
level 46
Jan 21, 2019
Yea it is pretty tough when english isnt your first language. First you have to know how the above words are prounounced ( and the people that DO speak english cant even seem to agree haha) then think about that sound and hope another word sounding like that comes to mind, and your vocabulary in other languages are usually always smaller than in your own language. (Though they still might be bigger than someone elses for whom it IS their native language ;) )

something just has to click when thinking of a sound. And in another language not all words are as readily available/accessible

That said I did get all but rye and ward. I havent looked the phonetic spelling up, but I still sort of see them as pronounced differently. Ward is spoken with an a that tends towards an o (as in warthog, not an a as in part) The a in warred (I assume from war, cause there could ofcourse be another warred that is pronouced differently) sounds more like hard.

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