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Homophones #1

For each word, guess (and correctly spell) its homophone.
A homophone is a word that sounds the same but is spelled differently
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: March 18, 2018
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First submittedFebruary 18, 2013
Times taken138,701
Average score70.4%
Rating4.52
5:00
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Word
Homophone
Days
Daze
Waste
Waist
Pause
Paws
Him
Hymn
Profit
Prophet
Slay
Sleigh
Links
Lynx
Patients
Patience
Step
Steppe
Word
Homophone
Ate
Eight
Seen
Scene
Peer
Pier
Council
Counsel
Beau
Bow
Plum
Plumb
Faze
Phase
Time
Thyme
Cast
Caste
Word
Homophone
Spade
Spayed
Gate
Gait
Ward
Warred
Rye
Wry
Earn
Urn
Cereal
Serial
Brews
Bruise
Ducked
Duct
Manner
Manor
+2
Level 72
Jun 27, 2018
If earn and urn sound the same, you're pronouncing (at least) one of them wrong.
+14
Level 70
Jun 27, 2018
No you're not.
+12
Level 76
Jun 27, 2018
Have you got a dictionary with phonetic pronunciation to back that up? Because all the ones I've checked have them pronounced exactly the same. I linked my sources above, but I'll do again here because why not:

Dictionary.com: urn, earn

Merriam-Webster: urn, earn

Oxford: urn, earn

Cambridge: urn, earn

+1
Level 21
Feb 9, 2024
Agree, earn and urn are pronounced differently in many accents, certainly in Scotland, where I’m from.
+1
Level 66
Jun 27, 2018
As an in-house legal counsel in the US, you would be surprised how many people misspell my title (including the current president, who never gets it right on twitter).
+4
Level 37
Jan 21, 2019
Why would you expect him to get it right? Forget his tax returns, I want to see his college transcript.
+3
Level 63
Jun 27, 2018
Manna/mana is pronounced the same as manner in all countries except for the USA. Only Americans stress their 'or's and 'er's.
+6
Level 82
Jun 27, 2018
It's cute how people outside of the United States believe that their country represents the entire rest of the world. They're invariably wrong, but they speak with such confidence you'd almost be convinced that they knew what they were talking about.
+17
Level 70
Jun 27, 2018
It's cute how @kalbahamut believes that @undeadwarrior and maybe a few other people he has met represent the entire rest of the world. He's wrong, but speaks in such a patronising way that you'd almost be convinced he knew what he was talking about.
+1
Level 82
Jul 21, 2019
undeadwarrior said, verbatim: all countries except for the USA.

I made no such overreaching statement. I said people (such as undeadwarrior)

My statement is self-evidently true, as the phenomenon I was describing takes place a half inch up the page. And I'm going to take the 5 likes TWW got on his comment as further evidence that I'm right. The tens of thousands upon thousands of other examples proving my point in my collective life experience, or even just here in the comment sections of this very website, are not even necessary to reference. Undeadwarrior is demonstrably wrong. If you're not convinced I know what I'm talking about in this instance, any patronizing manner someone uses to address you is probably deserved.

+2
Level 70
Jul 21, 2019
If it was in general true that people outside of the USA thought their country represented the rest of the world, then there wouldn't be nearly as many countries where people are fiercely nationalistic and think all foreigners are different to them. And even if you want to make out that your comment wasn't overreaching (though it was, given that you said invariably wrong) I am still not convinced that there is any sort of general rule applicable here.
+3
Level 48
Jun 27, 2018
In Ireland manner and manor sound the same, it certainly does not sound the same as manna.

No issue with any of the above homophones.

+3
Level 82
Jul 21, 2019
oh no. quick, oversensitive Europeans, plug your ears before your egos are hopelessly shattered.
+1
Level 37
Jul 21, 2019
How can ManEr and ManOr sound the same?
+7
Level 70
Jul 21, 2019
Because they both use a schwa (undressed vowel).
+1
Level 59
Jul 30, 2021
NOOOO! Have half the 'English' people on here never ventured down the road to Bristol, or Devon, or Cornwall, or anywhere in the West country? Have they never been to Scotland or any part of Ireland? The 'r' is pronounced in many parts of England and in the UK. Such adamant 'certainty' about fallacy.
+2
Level 81
Oct 1, 2021
Sad Canadian noises
+1
Level 78
Jun 27, 2018
Isn't "sin" a homophone of "seen"?
+10
Level 70
Jun 28, 2018
Not sure what accent you speak with but I would certainly pronounce seen with a longer 'ee' sound than the shorter 'i' sound in sin.
+3
Level 79
Jun 27, 2018
Karst should be accepted
+5
Level 62
Jun 28, 2018
It would be fun to have a series of quizzes that focuses on homophones in specified accents from around the world. This comment section can provide a healthy start.
+1
Level 59
Nov 17, 2020
THAT'D BE AWESOME!
+1
Level 64
Jun 28, 2018
Same as above. Hem for him. General American accent.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonological_change#Merger

+4
Level 35
Jun 28, 2018
what about earn = ern or erne, which is a seabird
+1
Level 50
Jun 29, 2018
I'm the biggest failure at this... my mind was dying, and I literally got four. ._.
+3
Level 65
Jan 21, 2019
Has it revived?
+1
Level 74
Sep 27, 2018
Great quiz, got all with 3:00 to spare. Please consider accepting 'fays' for faze.
+1
Level 88
Jan 21, 2019
3:42 because of a typo....
+1
Level 23
Jan 21, 2019
English isn't my first language and this was surprisingly hard! Only got 8 and missed some obvious ones like patience and scene
+4
Level 65
Jan 21, 2019
Yea it is pretty tough when english isnt your first language. First you have to know how the above words are prounounced ( and the people that DO speak english cant even seem to agree haha) then think about that sound and hope another word sounding like that comes to mind, and your vocabulary in other languages are usually always smaller than in your own language. (Though they still might be bigger than someone elses for whom it IS their native language ;) )

something just has to click when thinking of a sound. And in another language not all words are as readily available/accessible

That said I did get all but rye and ward. I havent looked the phonetic spelling up, but I still sort of see them as pronounced differently. Ward is spoken with an a that tends towards an o (as in warthog, not an a as in part) The a in warred (I assume from war, cause there could ofcourse be another warred that is pronouced differently) sounds more like hard.

+2
Level 70
Oct 1, 2021
I agree. Wry and rye are pronounced slightly differently (more breathiness and longer initial consonant), and ward and warred are very much pronounced differently (at least in northeastern US). Different vowel sounds.
+1
Level 60
Jul 7, 2019
Ducked and duct aren't pronounced the same. One ends with a t.. That's a tuh sound at the end.. The other one doesn't.
+5
Level 82
Jul 21, 2019
They are pronounced the same. D and T are the same sound but one is voiced. However, final consonant sounds in English are often de-voiced.
+1
Level 64
Jan 13, 2020
Missed earn/urn as I pronounce them completely differently.
+1
Level 66
Feb 12, 2020
Still not allowing 'manna' for 'manner' quizmaster? Shurely shome mishtake.
+1
Level 59
Feb 27, 2020
How about bruce?
+2
Level 79
Feb 27, 2020
Bruce ends with /s/, while brews/bruise end with /z/.
+1
Level 16
Mar 26, 2020
Got 100%

With help from Google! :D

+1
Level 60
Apr 9, 2020
the only reason i got serial was because we were in an overpass in my car, and i saw the pillars, and then, this happened. "Billar, Cillar, Dillar, ect. all the way to k. ....Killer, wait wat serial killer....

SERIAL

+1
Level 60
Apr 9, 2020
plz accept console for council. they sound so similar....
+2
Level 62
Apr 29, 2020
Hymn and Him are pronounced differently.
+1
Level 57
Apr 14, 2021
They sure are.
+1
Level 49
May 16, 2020
as someone from germany, face and faze are homophones to me
+1
Level 78
Jul 30, 2021
The difference between -ze and -ce (and the fact that words ending in s are usually pronounced like -ze) was drummed into us by our phonology lecturer at the uni.
+1
Level 19
May 22, 2020
In my opinion, this quiz was very good even though it was quite tough. It really made me think!
+1
Level 78
May 24, 2020
Hmmm I think pores and pours should have been accepted for the pause one
+1
Level 42
Aug 21, 2020
Are you serious? They are completely different.
+2
Level 66
Jun 27, 2020
Please accept 'karst' for cast; they sound the same at least in British and Australian English
+1
Level 28
Jul 3, 2020
I looked like a right idiot sounding each word about 5 times before putting the answer it
+1
Level 56
Jul 20, 2020
pours and pores but okay
+2
Level 60
Aug 18, 2020
Quay and key would be a fun one. Unless that’s just my pronunciation.
+1
Level 42
Aug 21, 2020
I've always pronounced the 'h' in thyme; it sounds different to 'time' when I say it.
+1
Level 39
Aug 25, 2020
I feel really dumb
+2
Level 39
Aug 27, 2020
You could accept pores for pause, pear for peer, and manna for manner. But I guess it kind of matters about your accent. >_
+2
Level 79
Nov 18, 2020
I pronounce 'ate' and 'eight' differently. I pronounce the former as /ɛt/, and the latter as /eɪt/.
+1
Level 58
Nov 24, 2020
What accent do you have?
+1
Level 79
Dec 17, 2020
I'm from Malaysia. And the Oxford Dictionary of English itself shows that both pronunciations of 'ate' are correct.
+2
Level 79
Dec 17, 2020
Also nice map you've got on your profile! I guess you highlighted Singapore, Andorra, Liechtenstein, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican City (the last four not visible) 😁
+1
Level 30
Apr 22, 2021
i had to say all these in an american accent to get this bahaha (im aussie)
+1
Level 37
May 30, 2021
Are 'wry' and 'rye' really homophones?
+1
Level 76
Jul 31, 2021
In common English, yes :)

If you watch/read Jojo's Bizarre Adventure, not so much though!

+2
Level 59
Jul 30, 2021
'Patients' and 'patience' are not homophones. The 't' is subtle, but pronounced.
+1
Level 67
Jul 30, 2021
I just realised that Some of these homophones I pronounce completely differently.
+1
Level 57
Jul 30, 2021
what about manna, as in 'manna from heaven'
+2
Level 61
Jul 31, 2021
Only missed one, and the only one which isn't a homophone in my accent is ward and warred. I was raised and live in the SE of England. Good quiz some were really tricky once I'd seen the first word
+2
Level 76
Jul 31, 2021
Would you be willing to accept Feys/Faes/Fays for homonyms to faze? They are just different spellings of a synonym for fairies/faeries. (Goodness, English has some strange standardisation principles for spelling.)

Fay is also used to describe fastening something tightly, so it stands on its own too.

+2
Level 88
Aug 6, 2021
Wow, I just read all 180 comments, for some reason. The discussion was both interesting and exhausting.
+2
Level 89
Jun 9, 2022
Lots of discussions regarding pronunciation differences. Fun to read for sure.
+1
Level 28
Oct 2, 2021
3:44 remaining!
+1
Level 60
Dec 26, 2021
fays (from the verb to fay) is also pronounced /feɪz/, same as faze and phase. (sources: fays, faze)
+2
Level 47
Jan 11, 2022
in the British English from where I'm from (London) ducked and duct are not homophones. I hope I'm getting the terms right, but the "ed" in ducked is not aspirated, while the t in duct is.
+1
Level 76
Jan 26, 2022
ait, ern, erne
+2
Level 65
Mar 3, 2022
Ward Spade and Council were intimidating.
+1
Level 36
Apr 14, 2022
Please accept sin for seen
+1
Level 44
Apr 25, 2022
seed and cede are good
+1
Level 36
Apr 28, 2022
what about "an" for "earn"?
+1
Level 70
Jun 9, 2022
Ait (small island in a river) should work, online dictionary confirms this too has this phonetic eɪt
+1
Level 45
Jun 12, 2022
Pretty happy with 14/27 as a non-native speaker :)

Difficult quiz!

+1
Level 16
Jun 13, 2022
100% 2:14
+1
Level 36
Jul 17, 2022
What about cancel for council?
+1
Level 48
Apr 1, 2023
these sound nothing the same
+2
Level 28
Oct 23, 2022
how did i only get 4 right
+1
Level 56
Oct 29, 2022
Dais for days.
+2
Level 66
Oct 29, 2022
Does patients and patience not have a totally different "T" sound?

Is this the case of the author pronouncing "T"s very softly at the end of words?

+1
Level 53
Jan 10, 2023
no way im the only one that thought of dio when i saw WRY
+2
Level 60
Feb 22, 2023
You should select homophones that don't have any other homophones in any dialect, for example you shouldn't use "paws/pause" because they rhyme with "pores/pours" in some dialects.
+3
Level 42
Mar 20, 2023
You should add what accent this homophone list is based off of, as different accents and dialects don't have the same ones.
+1
Level 48
Apr 1, 2023
can you accept bruce for brews
+2
Level 48
Apr 1, 2023
and accept pear for peer
+2
Level 56
Aug 8, 2023
In Singapore, North India, all of Oceania, the entirety of Africa, southern England, and some parts of the United States, "pause" is most certainly homophonous with "pores".
+1
Level 22
Feb 9, 2024
yessss i was thinking the same
+1
Level 47
Feb 9, 2024
What about "him" & "hem", as in "hemmed pants" or "hem of a shirt"?
+2
Level 53
Feb 9, 2024
Hi Quizmaster! Loved this—fun with words is fab! Please consider accepting Erne (as in the eagle) as a homophone for earn.

Thanks!

+1
Level 47
Feb 9, 2024
I'm Scottish and Earn and Urn sound nothing like each other. Not everyone is American.
+2
Level 22
Feb 9, 2024
ok?? its not about being american, im nigerian, and i pronouce it like that. stop trying to tell everyone how different you are and enjoy a good quiz
+1
Level 45
Feb 9, 2024
Seine for seen?
+1
Level 48
Feb 9, 2024
Isn't 'Seine' pronounced like 'sen'?
+2
Level 45
Feb 9, 2024
Also not everyone is American so this is kind of unfair.
+1
Level 51
Feb 12, 2024
no idea caste was different than cast
+1
Level 18
Feb 27, 2024
Oh, l lost my "patience" on this one (kept spelling it "pacience", thanks to my Latin-based mother tongue).... Couldn't get "wry" either...
+1
Level 18
Feb 27, 2024
Another thing: where l live (Oxford), "cast" (as in to "cast a spell") rhymes with "cost" rather than "caste" (social class, category, etc) but l know, that is subjective to regional variations.