Boston Talk to English Translation Quiz

Can you translate these phrases written by a New Englander into English?
These phrases are not necessarily exclusive to Boston
Quiz by WolfCam
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Last updated: May 26, 2020
First submittedApril 16, 2020
Times taken7,084
Rating4.26
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1. A wicked nor'easter over the bridge
A blizzard on Cape Cod
A crazy European
The devil
Someone from New York living in Boston
2. Jimmies on the Hoodsie
Rowers on the Charles River
Leaves changing color
Ice cream with sprinkles
A flurry in summer
3. Take the Pike not the T
Drive, don't take the train
Live in the city not the country
Care for yourself before helping others
Go with your gut
4. A Fluffernutter
A soft-shelled lobster
A peanut butter and marshmallow sandwich
A Vermonter
Someone who makes no sense
5. American Chop Suey
Something which is done better in Boston than anywhere else
Modern art
A Chinese restaurant
A pasta dish with beef and tomatoes
6. The B's are at the Gahden
Winter is over
The Boston Bruins have a game tonight
There are whales off of Cape Cod
There are a lot of Bostonians in the Common
7. A frickin' chowdahead
A fisherman
An idiot
A police officer
A great white shark
8. Tonic and Grindas
Soda and sandwiches
Women and men
Wine and beer
Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard
9. Give me Foddy for Dunks
I'm paying for the food
Do me a favor
I need money for coffee
Be quiet
10. P-Town
Providence
Portland
Provincetown
Plymouth
11. Leaf-Peepahs
People who hike the Appalachian Trail
Cardinals (sometimes also robins)
Sudden thunderstorms
Tourists who ogle fall foliage
12. Going on a Packie Run
Vacationing on the Cape
Running the Boston Marathon
Going to a football game
Buying Beer
13. Candlepin in the Hub
Going bowling in Boston
Setting a lobster trap
Having a conversation with drinks
A three-point shot in basketball
14. Bang a u'ey
Turn around
Get arrested
Hit a home run
Go on a date
+8
Level 81
Apr 17, 2020
People from Boston are the leaf peepers.

It's people cruising around the countryside looking at the fall colors. Not many people cruise around the packed city of Boston to look at canvases of foliage.

+1
Level 68
Apr 19, 2020
Yeah, pretty much. Anyone who goes to rural New England for foliage season may be a leaf peeper, but especially if you're from Boston and New York, and only venture west of Cambridge once every October.
+1
Level 72
Sep 18, 2020
New York is west of Cambridge...
+2
Level 72
Apr 21, 2020
Having gone to college and then lived for 11 yeahs in Bahstun, I can also confirm that leaf peeping is specifically about viewing fall foliage. However, I have never heard locals referred to as leaf peepers – only tourists (and not necessarily from New York).

Great quiz! Probably my easiest 100% yet!

+6
Level 72
Apr 17, 2020
I love how you worded the title. Essentially you are saying that Bostoners don't speak in English.
+11
Level 73
Apr 17, 2020
/r/thatsthejoke
+2
Level 82
Apr 20, 2020
Is it really a joke?
+1
Level 72
Apr 21, 2020
/r/whoosh
+4
Level 16
May 28, 2020
r/ihavereddit
+3
Level 70
Apr 17, 2020
This was harder for me than the British and Australian idiom quizzes. Apparently I will need a translation book if I ever visit Boston.
+5
Level 68
Apr 19, 2020
You won't run across too many people here who speak quite this extreme a version unless you ride the T (MBTA public transit). I am convinced that strength of accent is one of the hiring criteria to operate a bus or subway

!

+3
Level 72
Apr 21, 2020
… or go to the North End, or Southie, or Cambridge, or Dorchester, or the North Shore, or… ;-)
+1
Level 81
Apr 18, 2020
Got 11/14 - inspired guesses. Not bad for a Brit.
+13
Level 62
Apr 18, 2020
Fun Fact: The majority of Bostonians speak only in Patriots references and Mark Wahlberg quotes.
+2
Level 75
Apr 19, 2020
#12 sounds racists - I've just looked up the US meaning and apparently it means a package store over there but in the UK it is a derogatory way to refer to a Pakistani, or a corner shop run by a South Asian
+2
Level 62
Apr 19, 2020
I just looked it up, and while they are pronounced the same, the slur you are referring to is spelled differently than I've spelled it here.
+1
Level 75
Apr 25, 2020
Yes it is spelled differently, and I'm not suggesting that you intended any offence, but it does sound racist to my ear.

I guess it's due to different cultures having their own parlance and I'm not saying that it necessarily should be changed, just making you aware in case you want to consider changing it

+1
Level 64
Aug 25, 2020
It isn't racist unless you want it to be. Keep it in, it's not racist.
+6
Level 81
Apr 20, 2020
I'm wondering how much his friend wants to go to the booze store if he wants $40 for coffee.
+4
Level 65
May 26, 2020
The average American racist is not intelligent enough to discern among different nationalities in the Arab world. They just use the same catch-alls racisms for everybody.
+7
Level ∞
May 26, 2020
Unlike those discerning racists in other countries?
+1
Level 61
May 26, 2020
there are differences?
+3
Level 65
May 26, 2020
I mean, if they have a slur specific to Pakistanis, instead of just lumping them all together, then they're at least a bit more discerning than the people who wanted to depose Saddam Hussein in response to 9/11.
+1
Level 31
May 26, 2020
I asssumed it was referencing six-packs of beer?
+2
Level 77
Apr 20, 2020
Grew up in Boston, but left 14 years ago, so I'm glad I still got 100% after all these years.
+1
Level 52
May 26, 2020
so they do actually talk like this?
+1
Level 42
May 26, 2020
Yes and no. A lot of these are either combinations of local slang words, or brands turned into generics. For example, "over the bridge" doesn't mean "Cape Cod" regardless of context. It might be used in a conversation that is already in some way about the Cape, as in "Yeah, Charlie moved over the bridge after he retired." "Wicked" in this context would mean "serious," though I've rarely heard people combine with the the already serious "nor'easter," a nationally used name for the weather phenomenon. "Jimmies" are a word for sprinkles in New England. "Hoodsie" comes from Hood Ice Cream, an ice cream company based in Boston (like Atlantans use "coke" to mean "soda," even when not Coca Cola). AFAIK, "Take the pike not the T" is a not a universal way to say "drive, don't take the train" regardless of route. It is a combo of "take the Massachusetts Turnpike (since it is an option for your route)" and "don't take the 'T,'" which is the name of Boston's train system.
+3
Level 71
Apr 21, 2020
Two things: 1) leaf peepahs view foliage in the fall. Nothing to do with New Yorkahs in New England. 2) If yah gonna have a picture of a bridge at the top due to the first question, can it at least be the Sagamore or Bourne Bridges (the two that go to the Cape) and not the Zakim over the Chahles?
+4
Level ∞
Apr 21, 2020
Your suggestions have been adopted due to correct phrasing and pronunciation.
+2
Level 65
May 26, 2020
TIL American chop suey isn't found outside of Boston.
+1
Level 70
May 26, 2020
Not sure if I should be proud or disappointed after getting 12 right. I think it was watching COPS back in the 90s where I learned I should pahk the cah outside the apahtment.
+1
Level 66
May 26, 2020
10/14, only because some of the stuff said is still used by many people in Philly, also I had a teacher from Boston. I still love how people get mad at me for using the word "Jimmies".
+1
Level 46
May 26, 2020
12/14, not bad for a Southerner! This was almost like a foreign language to me...
+1
Level 65
May 26, 2020
I impressed myself with 9/14. Really not bad for a Zimbabwean. There were some things that I got because it was close to slang I know, there were some that I should have got P-town, and there were a whole load of lucky guesses.
+2
Level 63
May 26, 2020
Wow I was terrible at that lol. Luckily I'm not from New England so that's nice
+1
Level 65
May 26, 2020
What a fun idea for a quiz. It would be fun to do more of these for different regions. (I can't make one, though. I'm from Oregon, and we don't seem to have a lot of local slang/accents.)
+1
Level 76
May 27, 2020
I was surprised about grinders as that is usually western Massachusetts and Connecticut. Try this quiz for sandwich names in different regions.

https://www.jetpunk.com/user-quizzes/172295/names-for-submarines-sandwiches-in-the-us

+2
Level 49
May 27, 2020
No Aussie is going to get "bang a u'ey" wrong.
+1
Level 75
May 28, 2020
Haha yep.
+1
Level 75
May 28, 2020
12/14. Been to Boston only once but as an Aussie it actually was similar enough logic wise to translate it as our slang is equally as hard to understand.
+1
Level 65
May 28, 2020
Here is one for Pittsburgh.
+1
Level 57
Aug 24, 2020
I didn't understood the quiz, can someone explain me? Maybe I am too eastern to understand...
+1
Level 77
Nov 5, 2020
I say 'do a u-ey' as well and I'm from England - never knew it was a Bostonism