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Pord Wuzzle

Each pair of clues refers to a pair of answers that are the same aside from switching the first sound of each word. Typing either answer will get you the point.
Example: "coattail" or "tote kale"
Sounds matter, not spelling
Quiz by kalbahamut
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First submittedAugust 28, 2014
Last updatedOctober 20, 2018
Times taken4,959
Rating2.81
10:00
lood guck
0
 / 20 guessed
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Answer
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Garbage kept as a companion
JetPunk / pet junk
Melee between two women
Obese flying toy
cat fight / fat kite
The caped crusader
Prohibition on floor padding
Batman / mat ban
One who rescues cats from trees
Swamp enthusiast
fireman / mire fan
Pet sustenance
Jack the Ripper
dog food / fog dude
Baseball movie
Shopping complex for rabbits
Moneyball / bunny mall
City of lights
Bueller moving with springy steps
Paris, France / Ferris prance
Heavy, poisonous home
Something kids get checked for in school
lead house / head louse
Very popular sport
Sound of approaching Nazis
football / boot fall
Speedy mode of transportation
Street named for a bottom-heavy fruit
airplane / Pear Lane
First pope and heaven's bouncer
Warming device for acrylics and oils
Saint Peter / paints heater
A good place to keep novels
Safe haven for chefs
book case / cook base
Small boat that pulls larger boats
Tiny hand bag for insects
tugboat / bug tote
Where you plug something in
Result of carrying lemons in pants
power socket / sour pocket
Conflict it's unfair to bring a gun to
An evening for colonial flutes
knife fight / fife night
Headgear for Lady Gaga
Device to treat backpain
meat hat / heat mat
Someone to share the rent
Feeling that Tom and Scratchy experience
housemate / mouse hate
Place to park the space shuttle
a young man with a beer belly
launch pad / paunch lad
Symptom of herpes simplex 1
Purchased half-eaten apple
cold sore / sold core
Racists in Madrid
Command to exile taps and faucets
Spanish bigots / banish spigots
+1
level 77
Aug 28, 2014
I think these are much more fun if the clues are trickier and you really have to think about the answers. If you agree, try these harder versions:

Pord Wuzzle (Hard)
Pord Wuzzle (Impossible)
+1
level 70
Aug 29, 2014
These were already very hard for me, but very funny too.
+1
level 82
Sep 28, 2014
Yep hard enough for me as well. I think as a non-native I experience these as more difficult than natives do. At least I have a hard time to realise something is pronounced roughly the same way even though in writing it's completely different.
+3
level 76
Sep 5, 2014
"Knife" doesn't rhyme with "fief".
+1
level 77
Sep 6, 2014
I think it depends on who is saying it.
+1
level 77
Sep 6, 2014
The way most Americans pronounce the words, "boot" and "foot" also definitely do not rhyme... but is some other accents they do.
+1
level 77
Sep 6, 2014
Maybe I could change it to something about a Mayberry marathon.. as in "Fife Night"... Barney Fife, popular character played by Don Knots on the Andy Griffith Show. But that is probably too obscure for clues at this difficulty level. It would go better on one of the harder quizzes I made, even if the rhyming would work better.
+1
level 77
Sep 8, 2014
I could also change knife fight to nephyte... one of the tribes mentioned in the Book of Mormon... but that would be similarly obscure.
+1
level 44
Sep 28, 2014
fife night, an evening for Colonial flutes
+1
level 77
Sep 28, 2014
That's an idea. I might change it after this has rotated off the front page. Think I'll leave it as is for now.
+1
level 76
Sep 16, 2014
Loved this quiz. Thanks!
+1
level 54
Sep 28, 2014
Tricky but entertaining overall. Not sure if it is intentional to include half of each pair, but it would be "Tom and Jerry" or "Itchy and Scratchy" for one of the clues if you just meant one duo.
+2
level 77
Sep 28, 2014
Tom and Scratchy are cats who are always fighting with mice (Jerry and Itchy). I don't think Jerry and Itchy are self-loathing mice.
+1
level 62
Sep 28, 2014
Great and challenging quiz. Pretty happy to get 16. One of the answers doesn't quite fit the rules though: airplane/pear lane, which doesn't involve a switching of the first sounds. air plane would switch to plear ane (meaningless), and pear lane would switch to lair pane (window in a wild animal's home?).
+1
level 77
Sep 29, 2014
Why does the "p" and the "l" sound have to go together?
+2
level 62
Sep 29, 2014
If not, then there's not really a full switch. At the moment you've moved the p to the front of the word, but haven't switched anything back in its place. "Air" and "Ane" have the same initial sound, so "plair ane" would constitute a full switch, but of course have no meaning. "Lair pane" and "Pair lane" would be a full switch also, to match all the other answers.
+1
level 77
Sep 29, 2014
I'm using Pig Latin rules in which words that start a vowel can be considered to have null sound.
+1
level 77
Sep 29, 2014
I guess I could have made the clue something about the glass of the windows on Dr. Evil's home... but...
+1
level 62
Sep 29, 2014
Ah, ok! Not counting an initial vowel as a sound makes it work then.
+2
level 76
Sep 29, 2014
It would be nice if the plurals were a bit more flexible. Kept typing singular versions and not having them get accepted.
+1
level 77
Sep 29, 2014
for example?
+2
level 59
Jun 24, 2015
Spanish bigots, but that's only one!
+1
level 77
Jun 25, 2015
Accepting the singular form doesn't match with the clue, so I don't understand why you would be trying the singular. Is there another case where it doesn't matter?
+1
level 45
Sep 29, 2014
Got three in and I was like NOPE I CAN'T DO THIS
+1
level 43
Sep 30, 2014
I only made it to the second...
+3
level 22
Sep 30, 2014
not fun
+3
level 32
Mar 11, 2015
Jack the Ripper is "fog dude"??? Seriously?
+2
level 77
Mar 11, 2015
Nah we're just clowning.
+2
level 58
Apr 9, 2015
I thought that was pretty hilarious.
+2
level 44
Sep 8, 2015
I did so horrible on this quiz but I laughed so hard when I read some of the answers. Bug tote and fog dude had me nearly in tears.. haha
+2
level 76
Nov 27, 2015
I laughed way too much at "banish spigots".
+1
level 43
Oct 8, 2016
Quality quiz dude. Have you done every bloody jet punk quiz? I don't think I've seen one without a comment from you
+2
level 77
Oct 8, 2016
I know you are exaggerating, but, just to see, I clicked the "random quiz" link above and it took me to "Fun with Unicode," which I have not commented on yet. So, no.
+1
level 72
Oct 30, 2016
I spent way too much time trying to come up with flat c... / cat fl... for number 17
+1
level 62
May 21, 2017
Quiz wit. Whiz quit.
+2
level 49
Oct 1, 2017
This is very original and inspiring material.
+1
level 77
Oct 1, 2017
Thanks!
+1
level 71
Dec 5, 2017
Great idea, fun but tricky. "Purchased half-eaten apple" doesn't quite work for "sold core" - I tried "bought core" before I twigged you'd really given the opposite. Maybe "peddled" or "auctioned", or "disposed of half-eaten apple for money"...
+1
level 77
Dec 5, 2017
If something is purchased doesn't it necessarily follow that it has also been sold?
+3
level 76
Jan 13, 2018
What? You don't park the space shuttle on the launch pad! You... you know... launch it from the launch pad. You park it in the hangar.
+4
level 78
May 22, 2018
i got really stuck on paris, thinking city should be at the end but not knowing a word meaning that beginning with f. I have only ever heard americans/american movies put the country name after the city and don't do it myself so it didn't occur to me. I'm pretty sure they do it because the US has so many copies of place names in different states. We just assume its the original one if you don't say the country so it sounds really odd when it's added in.
+1
level 77
May 22, 2018
Interesting observation, and this may be *more* true in the United States where there are, for example, 69 different places called Springfield than it is true some other places... but even outside of the United States I can think of many, many examples where this could be useful. For example, there are at least a dozen cities named Alexandria. There's London, England and London, Ontario. There are lots of place names in the Portuguese, Spanish, Russian and Arabic speaking worlds that echo other, older place names.. Santiagos, Toledos, Cordovas, Portos, Pueblos, Medinas, and so on. There are tons of cities named after the same saints in different places. There are multiple Novgorods in Russia.
If you're not in the habit of being specific with your place names maybe you should get in to it! :)
+2
level 61
Jan 10, 2019
I think it is common practice that you normally mean the original one. Like when speaking of paris london etc. No need to add anything especially in an international conversation. Only when you live close to a town with a similar name it is usefull to specify.
+1
level 43
Oct 29, 2018
These types of things could be called "spoonerisms" These are described in this epic video, starting at 5:14 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hup_8uDXJx8
+1
level 48
Dec 19, 2018
I think this is the best wordplay comedy sketch that I've come across https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gi_6SaqVQSw
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