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Homonyms Quiz #9

We give you a pair of definitions. You guess the homonym.
  • Homonyms are words that have the same spelling and pronunciation, but different meanings.
  • Includes both true and polysemous homonyms
  • Quiz by Quizmaster - Sep 10, 2017
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Enter answers in the area marked "Enter answer here".

You can enter any answer, at any time - they don't have to be in order

Punctuation and capitalization don't matter on JetPunk.

Meaning #1
Meaning #2
Answer
Stumble
Voyage
Viewed
Lumberjack tool
Burial place
Serious indeed
French fry, to some
Poker necessity
Be recumbent
Commit perjury
Command
Opposite of chaos
Conflagration
Make redundant
Stood up
Common flower
Of high quality
Monetary penalty
Hunter's prey
Place to get rocks
Meaning #1
Meaning #2
Answer
Disgusting
Twelve dozen
Blunt weapon
Social association
Armoire, e.g.
Group of top advisors
Employ an index finger
Sharp tip
Column's counterpart
Paddle a boat
Wooden roof supporter
Ray of light
Rectangular container
Engage in pugilism
Dossier
Prison escapee's tool
Grotto, e.g.
To surrender
Apartment
Not curvy
Answer Stats
Meaning #1
Meaning #2
Answer
% Correct
Your %
+1
level 79
Mar 19, 2017
I am a bit perplexed by the "Make redundant" definition of fire. One does not "make someone redundant" by firing them, they fire them because they are redundant (i.e. there is no work for them). Perhaps someone can put a skewed opinion of how this could be the other way around. Simply put, I see it as a "Which came first--the chicken or the egg?" scenario.
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level 68
Mar 19, 2017
I agree that it makes absolutely no sense, but apparently it's a British thing. According to Merriam-Webster: Definition of make redundant British : to dismiss (a person who is no longer needed) from a job. More than 200 of the company's employees have already been made redundant.
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level 70
Mar 19, 2017
I just read through all the definitions of "fire" as a transitive verb in the OED, and I couldn't see any that mentioned redundancy.
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level 67
Aug 23, 2017
Not British, but "make redundant" is used where I am, slightly different meaning from "fire" though. Make redundant -> get of unnecessary staff, with payment according to regulations and contract. Fire -> get rid of staff who broke their contract / acted improperly. The process of firing is different from the process of redundancy, different regulations to follow.
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level 57
Sep 10, 2017
I thought so too. While I can see getting fired because one had been made redundant, it certainly does not actually mean "to be fired." It would be like saying "basketball accident" meant the same as "sprained ankle," or an egg beater was the same thing as scrambled eggs.
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level 53
Sep 11, 2017
I agree, "Make Redundant" is not a valid clue for "Fire".
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level ∞
Sep 12, 2017
I don't know the answer = not a valid clue
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level 44
Sep 28, 2017
Quizmaster we don't know the answer because it isn't a valid clue. Making someone redundant is not the same as firing them. Being fired means that you lost your job because you failed to do what was expected of you. Being made redundant means that your job no longer exists in the company, but it has no reflection on how you performed in the job. Try Googling 'difference between being fired and being made redundant' and you'll see they are very different things.
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level 61
Sep 11, 2017
I thought "to make redundant" is more like what we call in the states "to lay off." Which is almost another homonym.
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level 53
Sep 11, 2017
But how is laying off or firing someone making someone redundant. All it does is make them unemployed.
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level 32
Mar 19, 2017
To make someone redundant is to fire them . Makes sense to me. Also, excellent quiz I got 20/20.
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level 72
Mar 20, 2017
i got it only because I knew what a conflagration was...but otherwise, to me 'make redundant' would be something like "Repeat." It certainly isn't an American term that I am aware of. Perhaps a common usage in another country?
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level 75
Mar 24, 2017
Unbeknownst to me prior to today: Apparently the Brits use the term/idiom "make redundant" when dismissing employees. (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/make%20redundant)
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level 60
Mar 28, 2017
I can understand some confusion with redundant & fire. I am British and have been made redundant many years ago when my employer went out of business. I usually consider "to fire" someone as in ending their employment because of some misdemeanour rather than through lack of work. I got it though & realise that even in different parts of UK the exact meanings could be different. It was a fun quiz. I didn't know what "armoire" was so I missed out on that question.
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level 53
Sep 11, 2017
So you or your job were duplicated when you got fired? This still makes no sense to me.
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level 53
Sep 12, 2017
Two or more people do the same job. The company wishes to save money, so declares one of the people to be "redundant", and dismisses them.
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level 70
Sep 7, 2017
I'm not British but I got the fire one. Also, any chance you can accept "bureau" for armoire/group of advisors?
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level 28
Sep 13, 2017
If we ask French, Bureau means Desk, Armoire literally means Wardrobe/Cabinet
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level 61
Sep 10, 2017
Hunter's prey: Target. i have purchased small rocks at Target.
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level 51
Sep 10, 2017
Super fun!
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level 67
Sep 12, 2017
In Britain you can be made redundant when the company no longer has a requirement for the job you perform. Being fired is because you are not performing well or are guilty of misconduct. Both result in being unemployed but are a little different. Historically if a person was fired it was because of misconduct and the employer would take their tools from them and burn them - hence "fired". If they had not behaved badly their tools would be handed to them in a sack to take to another job hence the term "getting the sack"
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