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History by Letter - D

Name these historical people, places, and things beginning with the letter D.
Quiz by Geoguy
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Last updated: June 19, 2019
First submittedMay 20, 2014
Times taken43,465
Rating4.21
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Hint
Answer
Mona Lisa painter
Leonardo da Vinci
"On the Origin of Species"
Charles Darwin
Surrealist who painted melting clocks
Salvador Dali
First to sail directly from Portugal to India
Vasco da Gama
Reincarnated leader who fled Tibet
Dalai Lama
Genocidal region of western Sudan
Darfur
Conservative British PM born Jewish
Benjamin Disraeli
"Great" Persian king
mentioned in 5 Bible books
Darius
European era following the fall of Rome
The Dark Ages
Middle Eastern capital,
one of the world's oldest cities
Damascus
Founder and first queen of Carthage
Dido
Hint
Answer
He thought, therefore he was
Rene Descartes
French President, 1959-1969
Charles de Gaulle
Term for a Celtic priest
Druid
June 6, 1944 in Normandy
D-Day
First English circumnavigator
Francis Drake
First U.S. state
Delaware
Colony that became Indonesia
Dutch East Indies
Muslim shrine on
Jerusalem's Temple Mount
Dome of the Rock
Venetian leader's title
Doge
Alfred Nobel's invention
Dynamite
"Oliver Twist" author
Charles Dickens
+2
level 54
May 24, 2014
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe his name is Vasco DE Gama, not Da Gama.
+1
level 60
May 24, 2014
Thats what I kept typing too.
+9
level 72
May 28, 2014
It is indeed da Gama
+6
level ∞
Apr 26, 2016
You are wrong. :) But Vasco de Gama would have worked.
+15
level 82
Jun 29, 2014
Vasco da Gama and Charles de Gaulle seem wrong in this quiz. The "van/von/de/da" etc preceding the surname is not used as a basis of alphabetisation. Think "Catherine of Aragorn". Would you put that in a quiz with answers starting with "O" ?
+11
level 76
Jun 29, 2014
Did you mean Catherine of Aragon, or did I miss one of Strider's friends in LOTR?
+1
level 82
Sep 30, 2015
I keep confusing Aragon and Aragorn dammit!
+4
level 44
Aug 27, 2014
Seconded!
+6
level 76
Aug 28, 2015
Agree - de, d', van, von, of and so on aren't usually considered part of the surname or place of origin.
+5
level 71
Mar 10, 2016
Yes. This is a problem.
+3
level 66
Oct 23, 2016
I was also thinking this. :/
+2
level 77
Jun 4, 2019
It's an important part of the surname, though. His ancestors were not Gama. They were from Gama. Similarly, you would not file Osama bin Laden under "b". His surname is not Laden. ibn in Arabic means "son of," similar to "Mc/Mic/Mac" in some languages. You wouldn't file Norm MacDonald under "D." His name is not Donald. Or what about the surname Deville.. derived from the French "de Val" or "of the valley." But that doesn't change the fact that the surname is Deville. Not Ville.
+3
level ∞
Jun 19, 2019
Thanks. It's one of those things that either way I do it people will complain. The only way to make everyone happy would be to leave those people off the list entirely. And that would make me sad...
+2
level 66
Oct 24, 2019
The only relevant fact is that da Gama and de Gaulle are always listed under G. I doubt people would have complained if these appeared in a 'G'-quiz. I think Leonardo da Vinci belongs in an 'L'-quiz, as he is usually referred to as 'Leonardo'.
+1
level 77
Nov 17, 2019
^yeah, except that, they're not. You just made an "always" statement, but the existence of this quiz proves that statement wrong.
+2
level 54
Dec 6, 2019
Same with 'da Vinci' - he is Leonardo, and 'da Vinci' is not his surname.
+1
level 21
Dec 7, 2019
Right, because he was Leonardo FROM Vinci.
+1
level 72
Dec 8, 2019
By this logic would you also eliminate Descartes, Dumas and Debussy?
+2
level 70
Jun 30, 2014
Who else spelled it Dyn-O-Mite because they get their spelling from What's Happening?
+1
level 75
Mar 31, 2019
Good times taking this quiz.
+2
level 71
Oct 23, 2016
heh... Doge... Much Wow!
+1
level 73
Oct 24, 2016
First English circumnavigator is very badly and inexactly phrased. I expect most people will assume that it means circumnavigating the Earth but the question is ambiguous.
+4
level 47
Nov 13, 2016
I think it's perfectly fine.
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
Yeah, that might have been one of my more pedantic moments
+9
level 68
Feb 17, 2017
"I am, therefore I think." That's Descartes before de horse.
+3
level 67
Oct 24, 2018
This comment is underappreciated.
+1
level 77
Mar 22, 2018
Thank you for accepting "DYN-O-MITE!"
+1
level 75
Mar 31, 2019
No one indignantly protesting how calling it the Dark Ages is new age discrimination?
Apparently Stone Age is verboten now too. The Flintstones, Rubbles and Slates filed a class action suit.
+2
level 63
Jun 4, 2019
"Dark Ages" is a pretty clumsy description of that time but it's also so widely used that's hard to argue against its inclusion.
+3
level ∞
Jun 19, 2019
A lot of people say the Dark Ages weren't actually dark. But in my opinion they are very wrong. (Warning, long read). Western civilization had a major collapse after the fall of the Roman Empire.
+1
level 75
Jun 26, 2019
Europe was a clumsy mess for 5 centuries with far, far less recorded history, near no advancements and enormous societal regression. Pretty dark times.
+2
level 78
Dec 6, 2019
It's very complicated and I do think that there was NOT a true "fall" of the Roman Empire. But yes, there was a drop in civilization at that time, especially in England. By the way, the idea of "Dark Ages" is very British. We don't even say that in French.
+1
level 66
Dec 6, 2019
Many thanks to the Quizmaster for posting the link. I already saw it the last time I took the quiz and I found it very interesting. I definitely learned a lot from it and it's always a pleasure to stumble upon so much knowledge almost unexpectadly.
+4
level 59
Jun 4, 2019
No comment
+1
level 44
Dec 6, 2019
No comment on no comment
+2
level 72
Dec 6, 2019
I really have nothing to add to this.
+2
level 15
Dec 6, 2019
‘Da Vinci’ is no surname—it simply refers to Leonardo’s birthplace (Vinci) in Tuscany. Leonardo had no surname, and no-one in his time would ever have referred to him by ‘da Vinci’. (This distinguished him from e.g. Michelangelo, who did have a surname, i.e. Buonarroti.) Calling Leonardo ‘da Vinci’ simply shows the ignorance of people like Dan Brown. He can only be an answer under the letter L, if a quiz strives for accuracy.
+1
level 69
Dec 6, 2019
I agree. The only proper place to place Leonardo would be under letter "L". Da Vinci it's not a surname.
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