Obfuscations of Popular Cliches #1

Translate these long-winded phrases into the popular cliches that have the same meaning.
Quiz idea: CtG526
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: November 17, 2020
First submittedFebruary 24, 2013
Times taken26,270
Rating4.28
6:00
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Obfuscation
Saying
Precipitation composed of canine and feline organisms
Raining cats and dogs
Place your monetary possessions in the same locality as your oral cavity
Put your money
where your mouth is
Pulchritude is dependent on the ocular organ of that who appraises it
Beauty is in the eye
of the beholder
Discharging firearms upon ichthyoid creatures in a cylindrical container
Shooting fish in a barrel
Simian's parent's male sibling
Monkey's uncle
Amorous emotions are incapable of perceiving electromagnetic radiation
in the visible spectrum
Love is blind
Lucre causes the rotation of the celestial body upon which we reside
Money makes the
world go round
Transport cured porcine abdomen to one's domicile
Bring home the bacon
The portion of an ocean-bound unit of solid dihydrogen monoxide that is not submerged
Tip of the iceberg
A tertiary attempt will yield a propitious outcome
Third time's a charm
Don't allow even a solitary small mineral aggregate to remain in a non-inverted position
Leave no stone unturned
Buffet an equid whose biological functions have permanently ceased
Beat a dead horse
The set of all possible outcomes does not include a midday repast
devoid of monetary remuneration
There's no such thing
as a free lunch
Desiccated as a piece of mineralized osseous tissue
Dry as a bone
+16
Level 71
Mar 11, 2013
The proper phrase is "Third time's the charm."
+6
Level 81
Apr 10, 2013
I concur.
+5
Level ∞
Apr 10, 2013
"A charm" is definitely the most common version. Since there's no official standards body for this, I can't imagine there is a proper version. Nevertheless, the quiz will now accept "the charm" as well.
+2
Level 63
Sep 23, 2015
I agree with quizmaster on this one.
+1
Level 78
Sep 24, 2015
I always heard it as simply, "Third time's charm."
+20
Level 75
Oct 6, 2017
I disagree with Quizmaster--I NEVER heard "a charm".
+5
Level 61
Dec 3, 2020
The original phrase appears to be "Third time's the charm." It has been a phrase according to Google Ngram viewer since the early 1800s. "Third time's a charm" only sprang up in 1920 and has been used less consistently the last 100 years. "Third time lucky" became more popular than both in the 1920s and has been more popular since. Quizmaster was definitely wrong on this one. My worldview has collapsed.
+6
Level 56
Apr 10, 2013
Can you accept "third time lucky" for this as well please?
+3
Level 10
Apr 10, 2013
Seconding this. I've heard "Third time lucky" thousands of times, but have never in my life come across "third time's a charm". Americanism, I guess.

Fantastic idea for a quiz though!

+2
Level 70
Apr 11, 2013
Thirded (see my comment below).
+3
Level ∞
Apr 12, 2013
Okay, that will work now.
+2
Level 63
May 21, 2013
I disagree.
+1
Level 35
Nov 6, 2013
I've never heard "the charm" except on American TV. From what I've gathered, the charm version is American.
+1
Level 70
Jan 4, 2014
I've always heard "third try's the charm". And "try" seems to fit better with your substitution of "attempt" than "time" would.
+1
Level 70
Apr 1, 2014
My thoughts exactly.
+1
Level 61
Oct 7, 2017
Agreed. I've never once heard "a charm."
+9
Level 69
Oct 23, 2020
I know this is from 2014, but I like how you came back to agree with yourself after 3 months.
+2
Level 73
Oct 7, 2017
I've only ever heard it as "three time's a charm".
+1
Level 73
Mar 1, 2021
But to be fair, if you say both versions quickly - especially "three time's the charm" - you won't be able to hear the difference anyway. Maybe I only heard "a charm" because I never saw it written.
+6
Level 82
Jul 5, 2018
Number of Google search results for "third time's a charm" (in quotes): 437,000

Number of Google search results for "third time's the charm" (in quotes): 478,000

+3
Level 66
Apr 11, 2020
About 733,000 results for "third time lucky" when I tried it.
+1
Level 83
Dec 4, 2020
The number of type-ins jammed into the answer boxes making this quiz must be mind boggling.
+1
Level 69
Dec 8, 2020
I'm amazed at the powers of recollection in the people who can categorically state that they've "never" heard the expression one way or "always" have heard it another way. Personally, "a charm" seems to flow off my tongue a little easier, so that's probably how I've heard and said it most of the time.
+2
Level 59
Apr 10, 2013
Fun! More of these please!
+1
Level 72
Apr 10, 2013
Good quiz!
+1
Level 66
Apr 10, 2013
Got all of them except "tip of the iceberg." Finally, after 14 years, I have found a use for studying Latin in high school!
+1
Level 45
Apr 10, 2013
Could you accept just the words "no free lunch?"
+1
Level 35
Nov 6, 2013
Well that's just lazy
+1
Level 78
Sep 24, 2015
I sometimes hear it as, "There's no free lunch." People misquote or modernize cliches all the time to the point that sometimes it's difficult to know what the original phrase might have been. I don't see that as being lazy.
+1
Level ∞
Apr 5, 2017
No free lunch will work now
+5
Level 65
Oct 6, 2017
What about TANSTAAFL...
+4
Level 61
Apr 10, 2013
Love this! I kept trying "Love makes the world go round." Guess I'm not cynical enough LOL
+1
Level 49
Mar 23, 2018
I kept trying _____ makes the world spin around .. sigh
+3
Level 50
Jun 6, 2018
YoU sPiN mE rIgHt RoUnD lIkE a ReCoRd BaBy
+1
Level 90
Apr 10, 2013
Gah, got caught on third try instead of third time.
+1
Level 49
Apr 10, 2013
Very fun. Finished with 3:45 remaining.
+1
Level 67
Apr 10, 2013
So difficult! I tried every version of "don't leave any rock unturned" that I could think of, but didn't manage to get it right.
+1
Level 44
Apr 10, 2013
I kept trying to put "in the eye of the beholder." I think that should be an acceptable answer. :/
+3
Level 35
Nov 6, 2013
No it shouldn't. This quiz is supposed to catch you out with the vague words you've never heard of. If it was accepted without beauty you miss out on the fun of the quiz.
+1
Level 70
Apr 11, 2013
I love this quiz. Just one comment. In Britain we say 'Third time lucky', so perhaps you could allow this as an answer. I've never heard 'Third time's a charm'.
+1
Level 44
Apr 12, 2013
Tried "don't leave a stone unturned" - Is that close enough?
+1
Level 20
Apr 12, 2013
Epicly hard quiz o.o! Interesting though at the same time.
+1
Level 20
Apr 16, 2013
Equally confused on these... I got 1/14.
+1
Level 82
Sep 23, 2015
It's so easy... just think about what the words mean.
+1
Level 25
Apr 24, 2013
beauty is in the eyes of the beholder should be accepted. not just eye
+1
Level 13
Apr 24, 2013
Best quiz I've taken yet. Make more!
+1
Level 25
Feb 20, 2014
can you accept "third time is the charm"
+1
Level 84
Sep 30, 2014
This might be my favorite quiz on here. The Jospeh Ducreux meme is fantastic.
+1
Level 82
Sep 23, 2015
Elementary.
+1
Level 43
Sep 23, 2015
Nice quiz. Fun and makes you think. Got most of them too!
+1
Level 59
Sep 23, 2015
Where's #2, please?
+1
Level ∞
Apr 5, 2017
http://www.jetpunk.com/quizzes/obfuscations-of-popular-cliches-2
+1
Level 63
Sep 23, 2015
Can you accept beat the dead horse?
+1
Level 73
Mar 1, 2021
And there I thought it was referring to "Drop the dead donkey". :]
+1
Level 46
Sep 23, 2015
Thanks so much for this quiz, it's so fun!!! I got them all with 2:09 to spare! These made me laugh quite a bit.
+1
Level 61
Sep 24, 2015
bloody hell bit more challenging than most here, good to see. thanks for the thought that went into it
+1
Level 67
Sep 24, 2015
This was brilliant - actually made me think, unlike so many others. Off to try quiz #2, but can't wait for more like this.
+1
Level 47
Sep 24, 2015
"Third time is a charm" Please don't mandate contractions.
+1
Level 53
Jun 8, 2016
Could you accept "don't leave a stone unturned"?
+1
Level 65
Aug 29, 2017
Agree, the exact version I am familiar with is: "don't leave any stone unturned", but this also was not accepted. Please accept more versions of this saying as acceptable variations exist.
+1
Level ∞
Nov 17, 2020
That one will work now
+1
Level 81
Aug 7, 2016
Hmm...never heard of a monkey's uncle.
+1
Level 70
Oct 6, 2017
Well I'll be a monkey's uncle!
+1
Level 66
Apr 11, 2020
Me neither. Do Americans (or non-Brits) use "Dutch Uncle" at all? Not that I am suggesting that the Dutch are simian.
+1
Level 51
Dec 6, 2020
I am Australian and I don't think I've ever heard of "Dutch uncle". Looking it up though, I think I might have a Dutch uncle or two..
+1
Level 73
Mar 1, 2021
Never heard that one before either, but managed to translate the clue correctly.
+1
Level 65
Mar 7, 2017
I was happily amazed when it accepted "Third time lucky", but then I was sadly amazed when it didn't accept "Kick a dead horse"
+1
Level 70
Oct 6, 2017
I agree, I tried at least four versions of hitting, kicking, whipping the poor old horse, but didn't get it.
+1
Level 79
May 12, 2019
"Kick a dead horse" really can't be accepted?
+1
Level 65
Oct 6, 2017
6 minutes seems awfully long for 14 questions
+1
Level 59
Oct 6, 2017
Allow 'Beauty is int he EYES of the beholder' (plural)?
+1
Level ∞
Nov 17, 2020
That will work now
+1
Level 66
Oct 6, 2017
Another cliche is "blind as a bat"
+1
Level 54
Oct 6, 2017
This was an excellent quiz. The only one I had trouble with the phrasing was 'Bring home the bacon' as I first tried 'Take home the bacon'. Thanks!
+1
Level 61
Oct 7, 2017
Surely bring the bacon home should be permissable?
+1
Level 73
Oct 7, 2017
That's what I tried too. I think a little more leniency should be expected with the exact phrasing. For instance, it took me quite a while to get the first one: "It rains cats and dogs" - not accepted (although that's what most people would say in the context). "Rains cats and dogs" - not accepted. Just "cats and dogs" perhaps? Who are you kidding? No it absolutely has to be "rainING..." - even if nothing in the clue hinted at that. And like klo7 said, the literal translation would be "rain of dogs and cats"; so the order in the clue is wrong too, as you'd never say "dogs and cats".
+2
Level ∞
Oct 8, 2017
Your assumption that we require exact phrasing is incorrect. We accept many different phrases for each question. We will accept "rains cats and dogs" now too.
+3
Level 43
Oct 15, 2017
haha for some reason my brain insisted it was 'shooting rats in a barrel'
+1
Level 64
Dec 7, 2017
This was a fun one!
+1
Level 70
Oct 24, 2018
This was fantastic. 3:06.
+1
Level 55
Dec 23, 2019
I love this one, I couldn't figure out the bacon one for the life of me. I was trying "bringing a pig's stomach to my house" and stupid things like that
+2
Level 75
Dec 1, 2020
4 up from 2 from many years ago. This is truly a benchmark test for your English skills if you're a foreigner.
+1
Level 45
Dec 1, 2020
Impressive. I'd get 0 in my second language (Spanish)
+2
Level 44
Dec 2, 2020
What has mineralised got to do with it? Osseous tissue means bone. Mineralized means it is petrified in some way - a total red herring. Or a forage fish in large schools in the North Atlantic emitting longer length waves in the visible spectrum.
+1
Level 67
Dec 7, 2020
I agree I was thinking of phrases with fossil
+1
Level 38
Dec 2, 2020
The Earth goes round, uncle, love can't see the light. Anyway, I think dogs and cats should be accepted regardless, as I never heard of the saying before but kept guessing variations of "raining dogs and cats" in accordance with the relevant clue. Also I think the two instances of "your" in the money/mouth example should not be required, as it can easily be replaced with "one's" or "the" and still remain correct. Indeed, I guessed the answer without any of those words, as in "put money where mouth is" at first, due to the variously multiple options and possibilities for it. Furthermore, I believe you should definitely allow "no such thing as a free lunch" to function in addition to "no free lunch". And just my personal opinion, I've away head "third time's the charm" rather than "a" but I suppose that has already been extensively relitigated on here as with elsewhere. Thanks for all the fun!
+1
Level 66
Dec 2, 2020
I don't think "put one's money where one's mouth is" works though, because the phrase is always used as a direct challenge. Someone makes a claim that you think is wrong, and you respond "put your money where your mouth is." That's the phrase. I can't imagine anyone using "one's" or "his" or "her" or any other construction given the way the phrase is used.
+1
Level 52
Mar 2, 2021
Never heard of the free lunch one before